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post #4351 of 4357
Quote:
Originally Posted by A Y View Post

I did! biggrin.gif

Also, received my Kinu 47 last week, but the instructions are all in German, and I didn't want to dial it in on expensive coffee, so it's still unused. Here's a glamour shot of it before it gets dinged up with use:

32451757400_e0953c9ddc_c.jpg

So hot.
post #4352 of 4357
Thought I would share my experience dialing in the Feldgrind to match the Lido 3. I was using the Lido 3 at 10.5 for chemex using a metal filter from Able Brewing. I ended up at +3 full turns from 0 on the Feldgrind for the same grind visually and the same flow rate. I calculate this as a 4X since there are 14 marks per full turn on the Feldgrind for a total of 42 (10.5 x 4 = 42). Hopefully, the ratio holds up for Aeropress.
post #4353 of 4357
Random question here, but what do you suppose contributes to a coffee's aftertaste? Can we all agree that a cup of fine coffee should have a pleasant aftertaste even an hour or two after drinking? I bought some Burundian beans which look normal and taste great, but have a terrible aftertaste that just lingers and lingers. Hard to describe the flavor, but the sensation on my tongue is similar to tannic -- dry and bitter. I've tried grinding on my Encore finer and courser to extract more and less which doesn't help. I've also tried two different methods of brewing. I'm beginning to think the beans are underroasted. In my experience though, when I tasted coffee from underroasted beans, I could tell immediately because it tasted so vegetative.

As an aside, and to PB and Andre's point, I've had coffee from overroasted, overextracted beans, I got a rubber, ashy, chemical taste. It doesn't seem to hard to me to overextract...
post #4354 of 4357
Coffee is a tannic product, when your mouth gets dry bacteria tends to grow more rapidly so if you're talking about flavors or mouthfeel an hour later that may be an issue to be solved with a toothbrush.
post #4355 of 4357
Quote:
Originally Posted by Renault78law View Post

Can we all agree that a cup of fine coffee should have a pleasant aftertaste even an hour or two after drinking?

An hour or two? butbut.gif



I don't think I've ever tasted anything in my life that lasted more than a couple minutes.
post #4356 of 4357
Thirded
post #4357 of 4357
Quote:
Originally Posted by Renault78law View Post

Random question here, but what do you suppose contributes to a coffee's aftertaste? Can we all agree that a cup of fine coffee should have a pleasant aftertaste even an hour or two after drinking? I bought some Burundian beans which look normal and taste great, but have a terrible aftertaste that just lingers and lingers. Hard to describe the flavor, but the sensation on my tongue is similar to tannic -- dry and bitter. I've tried grinding on my Encore finer and courser to extract more and less which doesn't help. I've also tried two different methods of brewing. I'm beginning to think the beans are underroasted. In my experience though, when I tasted coffee from underroasted beans, I could tell immediately because it tasted so vegetative.

As an aside, and to PB and Andre's point, I've had coffee from overroasted, overextracted beans, I got a rubber, ashy, chemical taste. It doesn't seem to hard to me to overextract...

I always drink coffee with plenty of water. I don't like the ashy aftertaste
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