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Lets talk about COFFEE - Page 30

post #436 of 2680
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adele View Post

I would really love to drink coffee with cream.

Then do that.
post #437 of 2680
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adele View Post

I would really love to drink coffee with cream.


Somebody serve this man a coffee with cream!

 

post #438 of 2680

Question for SF coffee people:

 

How much of a connoisseur are you?

post #439 of 2680
Never explored coffee further than my cheap drip machine, but as much as I drink, I want to take the plunge into learning more about making it and the finer details of its flavor. About to buy the bodum chambord french press. Good idea? alternatives? Also, where should I look for a cheap burr grinder, nothing garbage but keeping in mind that I'm just starting out? Thanks smile.gif
post #440 of 2680
French press is a good way to start out. The Capresso and Bodum grinders are good grinders for FP. If you don't mind cranking by hand, the Harios are also good. Make sure you use good water (filtered, reverse osmosis).
post #441 of 2680
Thanks for the reply. As to filtered water, how important is this really? Is that just like a brita pitcher? Also, what do you use to heat your water and regulate temperature?
post #442 of 2680
The Brita is better than nothing. Do you have a good source of bottled water? Water quality is probably as important as the bean quality. For heating water up, I have an electric kettle and a 2-cup pitcher that I use in the microwave. If I need a lot of water, then I use the kettle. You can also use a stove top kettle. You can take it off boil, and pour it in --- the FP will leak heat anyway. Just do it in a consistent way so that if you need to adjust something, you can do it.

On a different subject, people who are near one of Counter Culture's training centers (http://counterculturecoffee.com/training-centers) have access to what looks like an amazing variety of classes.

I just saw this one on Facebook about different coffee varietals, including a cupping to taste them, that sounds like a simulcast:

https://www.facebook.com/events/354539427912439/
Quote:
There are thousands of arabica coffee varieties growing in the world, but the vast majority of coffee cultivation and consumption centers around a select few. In the same way that different grape cultivars affect wine flavor, coffee variety influences cup characteristics. To explore this fascinating topic further, we've created a short film and an accompanying cupping, comparing 12 + varieties – and we want to share it all with YOU!

Join us Monday, March 5, at 3:30 p.m. EST (2:30 p.m. in Chicago) at your local training center for a varieties film screening, cupping, and online Q&A session with Director of Coffee Peter Giuliano.

This special Counter Intelligence event is free and open to the (cupping experienced) public.
post #443 of 2680
Nespresso: surprisingly good.
Or maybe it's the fact that its free.
Have one of the professional gemini ones at the office I work at - 2 shots in the morning.
post #444 of 2680
Quote:
Originally Posted by blahman View Post

Nespresso: surprisingly good.
Or maybe it's the fact that its free.
Have one of the professional gemini ones at the office I work at - 2 shots in the morning.

I've begun to appreciate Nespresso. It is not the holy grain of espresso, but it is better than a lot of stuff out there during the work day. I love the consistancy.
post #445 of 2680
One of those "best-of" lists about coffee places in NYC: http://imbibemagazine.com/Best-Coffee-in-New-York-City

Not sure how credible.
post #446 of 2680
For some reason it is blocked by my job. I'll have to check it out and give my 2 cents.
post #447 of 2680
I pasted it below, some interesting places in Brooklyn that I havent heard of before like WTF and Upright. I love Third Rail but certainly wouldnt say it is great for "people watching."
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Best no-frills coffee: Ninth Street Espresso
Don’t expect coffee syrups or flavorings at these three NYC cafés—in fact you won’t even spot a mocha on the menu. What you will find are flawlessly executed espresso drinks made with Ninth Street’s own house blend of Intelligentsia beans alongside single-origin house coffees brewed via Chemex, urn and cold soak.
Multiple locations around New York City

Most diverse brewing methods: WTF Coffee Lab
Sock pot, pourover, Chemex, siphon, cold brew—for the uninitiated, this Brooklyn café looks more like a chemistry lab that a coffee shop, but each delicious sip, no matter the method you choose, satisfies the inner coffee geek in us all.
47 Willoughby Ave., Brooklyn

Best bagels + brew: Bedford Hill Coffee Bar
It’s easy to find good cup of coffee or a tasty bagel independent of each other in New York, but finding the two together can be a challenge. Enter Bedford Hill Coffee Bar, which serves up of Anodyne coffee and espresso drinks alongside toasted toothsome delights from New Yorker Bagels.
343 Franklin Ave., Brooklyn; 718-636-7650

Best-dressed baristas: Stumptown
While t-shirts and jeans tend to be common coffee shop attire, you’ll find the dapper baristas at Stumptown inside the Ace Hotel pulling shots of Hairbender espresso while decked out in pageboy caps, collared shirts and even the occasional tie and suspenders.
18 W. 29th St. New York City

Cleverest cold-brew: Upright Coffee
These days you can find almost any imbibable in a keg—beer, wine, cocktails—and now it’s coffee’s turn. Upright Coffee in Brooklyn cold-brews rotating beans from Brooklyn Roasting for 18 hours before transferring to a keg and hooking up to a chilled draught line for silky-smooth, low-acid iced coffee that’s deliciously drinkable any time of year.
860 Manhattan Ave, Brooklyn; 718-215-9910

Most inventive coffee pairing: Beaner Bar
Coffee and tamales? Why not! This Williamsburg café serves up creamy Counter Culture espresso drinks and single-origin pour-overs with deliciously authentic tamales for a lunch that can’t be beat.
447 Graham Ave., Brooklyn

Best hole-in-the-wall: Abraço
Blink and you’ll miss this teeny East Village coffee counter—though the occasional line out front might clue you in (don’t worry, it moves quickly). Order a Counter Culture espresso drink (their cortado is divine) and grab a brioche cinnamon bun to go.
86 E. 7th St., New York City

Tastiest cappuccino and cake: Café Pedlar
Got a sweet tooth? Head to Café Pedlar in Brooklyn where you can score Stumptown espresso drinks and rotating single-origin beans brewed via press pot or Chemex alongside scrumptious sweets like stout or olive oil cake, buttery croissants and even the traditional German sticky buns known as schnecken, all baked at Pedlar’s sister restaurant The Bakeshop at Frankies Spuntino. In the mood for something more savory? Try a chewy, salted pretzels or one of their blistery thin-crust pizzas.
210 Court St., Brooklyn; 718-855-7129

Most creative coffee offerings: The Randolph at Broome
Coffee bar by day and cocktail den by night, this Little Italy bar brews up some of the most inventive cups around. Try one of their augmented coffees—like the Fountain Head with sarsaparilla, star anise, birch and cream, or the Holy Cow with curry, coconut and cacao—each of which can be spiked with booze for just a few bucks more.
349 Broome St., New York City; 212-274-0667

Best warm fuzzies: Birch Coffee
Coffee can make you feel all warm and fuzzy on its own, but at this Flatiron café inside the Gershwin Hotel you’ll feel even better about your morning cup knowing that a portion of the sales goes to humanitarian aid in the Congo.
5 E. 27th St., New York City; 212-686-1444

Best pre-theater coffee: Everyman Espresso
Tucked into the lobby of the off-Broadway Classic Stage Company theatre, silken Counter Culture espresso drinks and pour-over coffees get the star treatment at this East Village café.
136 E. 13th St., New York City

Classiest coffee kiosk: Blue Bottle
Take a stroll along the lower west side’s elevated High Line walkway during the warmer months and you’ll spy Blue Bottle’s concession cart doling out supreme espresso and coffee drinks, including their New Orleans-style chicory-infused cold-brew.
The High Line may be accessed at multiple spots, go to thehighline.org for details.

Best people-watching: Third Rail
Grab an espresso drink made from a rotating selection of specialty roasters’ beans, snag a seat in front of the floor-to-ceiling, wall-to-wall front window, and watch the hustle and bustle of Greenwich Village and NYU go by. Or take your cup to go and meander through Washington Square Park, which is just a block away.
240 W. Sullivan St., New York City

Best rotating beans: RBC
While most cafés stick to brewing beans from only one roaster, RBC keeps things fresh with seasonal coffees from dozens of rotating roasters around the country. Order a single-origin espresso drink brewed on their prized Slayer espresso machine.
71 Worth St., New York City; 212-226-1111

Best commuter cup: Joe and the Art of Coffee
Commuters needing a little caffeinated kick head to Joe the Art of Coffee in the Graybar passage in Grand Central Terminal for expert on-the-go espresso drinks crafted by some of the best-trained baristas in the biz.
44 Grand Central Terminal, New York City; 212-661-8580

Best blends: Gimme! Coffee
Blending coffee is an art form, and Gimme! Coffee roasts up a handful of showstoppers like the Piccolo Mondo mix of rich Mexican and tangy Guatemalan beans and their super top-secret Leftist Espresso blend—the house bean for their cafés that dot the city.
Multiple locations throughout NYC and Brooklyn

Best place to unplug: Café Grumpy
For many people, the coffee shop does double duty as a remote office, but Café Grumpy’s Chelsea outpost pulls the plug on coffee and computing as one of the few cafés around town that doesn’t offer wi-fi or a place for patrons to power up. The result? A place where the public can take an actual coffee break (remember those?), replete with farm-direct, house-roasted coffee, fresh-baked pastries and some good old-fashioned coffee shop conversation.
224 W. 20th St., New York City (and with several additional locations around NYC and Brooklyn); 212-255-5511
post #448 of 2680
Quote:
Originally Posted by Axelman 17 View Post

I pasted it below, some interesting places in Brooklyn that I havent heard of before like WTF and Upright. I love Third Rail but certainly wouldnt say it is great for "people watching." Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Best no-frills coffee: Ninth Street Espresso
Don’t expect coffee syrups or flavorings at these three NYC cafés—in fact you won’t even spot a mocha on the menu. What you will find are flawlessly executed espresso drinks made with Ninth Street’s own house blend of Intelligentsia beans alongside single-origin house coffees brewed via Chemex, urn and cold soak.
Multiple locations around New York City
Most diverse brewing methods: WTF Coffee Lab
Sock pot, pourover, Chemex, siphon, cold brew—for the uninitiated, this Brooklyn café looks more like a chemistry lab that a coffee shop, but each delicious sip, no matter the method you choose, satisfies the inner coffee geek in us all.
47 Willoughby Ave., Brooklyn
Best bagels + brew: Bedford Hill Coffee Bar
It’s easy to find good cup of coffee or a tasty bagel independent of each other in New York, but finding the two together can be a challenge. Enter Bedford Hill Coffee Bar, which serves up of Anodyne coffee and espresso drinks alongside toasted toothsome delights from New Yorker Bagels.
343 Franklin Ave., Brooklyn; 718-636-7650
Best-dressed baristas: Stumptown
While t-shirts and jeans tend to be common coffee shop attire, you’ll find the dapper baristas at Stumptown inside the Ace Hotel pulling shots of Hairbender espresso while decked out in pageboy caps, collared shirts and even the occasional tie and suspenders.
18 W. 29th St. New York City
Cleverest cold-brew: Upright Coffee
These days you can find almost any imbibable in a keg—beer, wine, cocktails—and now it’s coffee’s turn. Upright Coffee in Brooklyn cold-brews rotating beans from Brooklyn Roasting for 18 hours before transferring to a keg and hooking up to a chilled draught line for silky-smooth, low-acid iced coffee that’s deliciously drinkable any time of year.
860 Manhattan Ave, Brooklyn; 718-215-9910
Most inventive coffee pairing: Beaner Bar
Coffee and tamales? Why not! This Williamsburg café serves up creamy Counter Culture espresso drinks and single-origin pour-overs with deliciously authentic tamales for a lunch that can’t be beat.
447 Graham Ave., Brooklyn
Best hole-in-the-wall: Abraço
Blink and you’ll miss this teeny East Village coffee counter—though the occasional line out front might clue you in (don’t worry, it moves quickly). Order a Counter Culture espresso drink (their cortado is divine) and grab a brioche cinnamon bun to go.
86 E. 7th St., New York City
Tastiest cappuccino and cake: Café Pedlar
Got a sweet tooth? Head to Café Pedlar in Brooklyn where you can score Stumptown espresso drinks and rotating single-origin beans brewed via press pot or Chemex alongside scrumptious sweets like stout or olive oil cake, buttery croissants and even the traditional German sticky buns known as schnecken, all baked at Pedlar’s sister restaurant The Bakeshop at Frankies Spuntino. In the mood for something more savory? Try a chewy, salted pretzels or one of their blistery thin-crust pizzas.
210 Court St., Brooklyn; 718-855-7129
Most creative coffee offerings: The Randolph at Broome
Coffee bar by day and cocktail den by night, this Little Italy bar brews up some of the most inventive cups around. Try one of their augmented coffees—like the Fountain Head with sarsaparilla, star anise, birch and cream, or the Holy Cow with curry, coconut and cacao—each of which can be spiked with booze for just a few bucks more.
349 Broome St., New York City; 212-274-0667
Best warm fuzzies: Birch Coffee
Coffee can make you feel all warm and fuzzy on its own, but at this Flatiron café inside the Gershwin Hotel you’ll feel even better about your morning cup knowing that a portion of the sales goes to humanitarian aid in the Congo.
5 E. 27th St., New York City; 212-686-1444
Best pre-theater coffee: Everyman Espresso
Tucked into the lobby of the off-Broadway Classic Stage Company theatre, silken Counter Culture espresso drinks and pour-over coffees get the star treatment at this East Village café.
136 E. 13th St., New York City
Classiest coffee kiosk: Blue Bottle
Take a stroll along the lower west side’s elevated High Line walkway during the warmer months and you’ll spy Blue Bottle’s concession cart doling out supreme espresso and coffee drinks, including their New Orleans-style chicory-infused cold-brew.
The High Line may be accessed at multiple spots, go to thehighline.org for details.
Best people-watching: Third Rail
Grab an espresso drink made from a rotating selection of specialty roasters’ beans, snag a seat in front of the floor-to-ceiling, wall-to-wall front window, and watch the hustle and bustle of Greenwich Village and NYU go by. Or take your cup to go and meander through Washington Square Park, which is just a block away.
240 W. Sullivan St., New York City
Best rotating beans: RBC
While most cafés stick to brewing beans from only one roaster, RBC keeps things fresh with seasonal coffees from dozens of rotating roasters around the country. Order a single-origin espresso drink brewed on their prized Slayer espresso machine.
71 Worth St., New York City; 212-226-1111
Best commuter cup: Joe and the Art of Coffee
Commuters needing a little caffeinated kick head to Joe the Art of Coffee in the Graybar passage in Grand Central Terminal for expert on-the-go espresso drinks crafted by some of the best-trained baristas in the biz.
44 Grand Central Terminal, New York City; 212-661-8580
Best blends: Gimme! Coffee
Blending coffee is an art form, and Gimme! Coffee roasts up a handful of showstoppers like the Piccolo Mondo mix of rich Mexican and tangy Guatemalan beans and their super top-secret Leftist Espresso blend—the house bean for their cafés that dot the city.
Multiple locations throughout NYC and Brooklyn
Best place to unplug: Café Grumpy
For many people, the coffee shop does double duty as a remote office, but Café Grumpy’s Chelsea outpost pulls the plug on coffee and computing as one of the few cafés around town that doesn’t offer wi-fi or a place for patrons to power up. The result? A place where the public can take an actual coffee break (remember those?), replete with farm-direct, house-roasted coffee, fresh-baked pastries and some good old-fashioned coffee shop conversation.
224 W. 20th St., New York City (and with several additional locations around NYC and Brooklyn); 212-255-5511

Beaner Bar serves Intelligencia coffee, not counter culture. Also, down the street from it a bit is Variety Cafe. One of the best places for Stumptown espresso, imo.
post #449 of 2680
Quote:
Originally Posted by VLSI View Post

Never explored coffee further than my cheap drip machine, but as much as I drink, I want to take the plunge into learning more about making it and the finer details of its flavor. About to buy the bodum chambord french press. Good idea? alternatives? Also, where should I look for a cheap burr grinder, nothing garbage but keeping in mind that I'm just starting out? Thanks :)


Great starting point.  My travel french press makes better coffee than 90% of coffee shops.  At home I really don't use it that much though since it takes a bit of time and care to get it right.  

 

I ended up throwing a bunch of cash down on a Gaggia super automatic espresso machine.  It's expensive but the convenience of having great coffee drinks (ground and brewed) at the push of a button is priceless.

 

And for water, Brita will do the job fine.

post #450 of 2680
Hey guys, make my daily coffee in my french press. However, Im wanting to get a espresso machine. I was hoping you guys could give me some good machine recommendations. Id LIKE to keep it ~400 for the machine, and then what is a decent grinder for maybe 100 or so? I have found that in reading, that many grinders won't grind small enough for many portafilters? Any help would be great.


I have been looking at the Gaggia Classic and a Bodum bistro grinder.



Thanks.
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