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Lets talk about COFFEE - Page 256

post #3826 of 4124
Quote:
Originally Posted by scottcw View Post


The usual suspects are Four Barrel, Sightglass, Ritual, and Blue Bottle. The last is overpriced and over-roasted for my tastes.


I like Ritual. Sightglass has better coffee, but the staff at Ritual tends to be much, much nicer. 

 

Saint Frank is also worth a look.

post #3827 of 4124
This four barrel Ethiopian is pretty good.

Maybe I will come back again for some espresso
post #3828 of 4124
Quote:
Originally Posted by otc View Post

Where should I drink coffee in San Francisco?

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by scottcw View Post


The usual suspects are Four Barrel, Sightglass, Ritual, and Blue Bottle. The last is overpriced and over-roasted for my tastes.

 

Andytown has great coffee.

post #3829 of 4124
Quote:
Originally Posted by joshuadowen View Post

Saint Frank is also worth a look.

Good call. Forgot about them.
post #3830 of 4124
Blue bottle overroasted? Have they changed fairly recently?
post #3831 of 4124
Quote:
Originally Posted by scottcw View Post

While all of the above is true regarding beans, water, and burr set, do not overlook how the burr set is implemented. Some cheaper grinders use a good burr set, but the adjustment mechanism or bearings are wonky. This results in the same inconsistent grind as a lesser quality burr set. I have seen some articles recommending using tape to keep the burr set stable. For home use, I use the original OE Lido. For travel, I use the Zassenhaus Panama.
Very true, which is exactly what I meant by the importance of having a well-stabilized mechanism.

It's likely that even a common manual grinder's burrs would be adequate if they didn't wobble around so much, but they do. As a result of this, I find the output quality of the typical Hario/Porlex-type mills with poorly-supported ends to be not much better than one of those noisy electric whirly-blade choppers for herbs that are mislabelled as having something to do with grinding coffee.
post #3832 of 4124
I modified my hario to wobble less. I think it's quite decent for an office set up
post #3833 of 4124
Quote:
Originally Posted by indesertum View Post

Blue bottle overroasted? Have they changed fairly recently?

I found them over-roasted when I moved to SF area in 2006 and the same when I left last summer.
post #3834 of 4124
Had a blue bottle macchiato... Nothing special IMHO. I've had it in NYC and wasn't blown away there either... But I happened to be walking by.

Bought a snickerdoodle cookie from them too. Either the cookie was mislabeled or they have a fundamental misunderstanding of what constitutes a snickerdoodle, but I was very disappointed.
post #3835 of 4124

I've had good espressos from Blue Bottle at the Embarcadero location (followed by some Humphrey Slocombe). But the most recent 'spro at a NY location was terrible (couldn't tell if it was overroasted or just horribly dialed in). 

post #3836 of 4124
Quote:
Originally Posted by Renault78law View Post

I'm just curious about your choice to buy another grinder. My recollection is that you brew coffee with an aeropress. Since the aeropress is so forgiving, my question is whether there is much benefit to using an excellent grinder. I could see better consistency, but when you're brewing basically one or two cups a day, how much does the grinder really matter? Again, we're talking coffee here, not espresso, so I don't believe fineness or uniformity really matter all that much.

Full disclosure: I'm uncharacteristically trying to take a practical approach to this relatively new hobby and I'm trying to convince myself that I don't need to buy an excellent grinder.

To follow up on some of the other good comments already, it depends on what kind of coffee you're making. Espresso is a thing in and of itself, and if that's your goal and you don't want to endlessly screw around, get a Nespresso: it's more consistent, cheaper (in the short term, and maybe long term if you never dial in your pull), and better than what most people can do, including cafes. Just recycle those capsules.

Consider how much coffee you're making. If it's a single cup, then the manual grinders are fine. The OE would be overkill, and a Hario is fine, especially if you're using a pretty forgiving method (like French press), but just because a method is forgiving doesn't mean it's indiscriminate: you can still tell differences, and it depends on how much those differences mean to you. The Baratza Encore is a great electric grinder otherwise, and pretty affordable and well-supported. I use one at home with an Aeropress (and metal filter).

Note that in the Sweet Home article linked, there's a hint that French press grind (a really coarse grind) is hard to do, and that is true, and different grinders perform differently at different grind sizes. The OE is supposed to be very good at coarse sizes. I'm still dialing mine in, and I think I have it pretty close to what my Hario did before in terms of grind size (14 notches on the OE), but if you put me in a blind test between the two, I'd have a hard time telling them apart right now. That's for my office setup which is an immersion brew (steep 3 minutes in an Espro body) poured through a paper filter.

I agree with PB that beans and good water make a bigger difference. Get beans that you like, make sure they're fresh (within 2 weeks of roast, and the bean does change and get better within that period), use filtered water (Brita is fine), and a reasonable grinder (basically not a whirly-blade), and you're more than 90% of the way there. No need to go all out initially before you figure out what you like. Brew parameters and grind size can make really huge differences too.
post #3837 of 4124
I would sooner grind my beans with a ballpeen hammer than drink Nespresso.
post #3838 of 4124
Quote:
Originally Posted by marvin100 View Post

I would sooner grind my beans with a ballpeen hammer than drink Nespresso.

https://video.yahoo.com/know-hate-night-watchmen-000000299.html
post #3839 of 4124
I'd rather drink purple nespresso than the blue bottle shot I had this morning any day.

This ritual Ethiopian pour over is good but the cup at four barrel is currently winning. Might also be that it is from a v60 while I think four barrel used a beehouse. I often find v60 produces a cup that is a little too acidic.
post #3840 of 4124
Nespresso's Bukeela pod is shockingly good.
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