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post #3631 of 4120
Folks, life is too short to save $5/mo freezing coffee beans. Buy the good stuff fresh, brew, repeat.

Or else get a tin of Folgers. No middle ground.
post #3632 of 4120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pennglock View Post

Folks, life is too short to save $5/mo freezing coffee beans. Buy the good stuff fresh, brew, repeat.

Or else get a tin of Folgers. No middle ground.

 

Indeed.

post #3633 of 4120
I mean by that logic I would be throwing out half a bag of beans every time... Whereas freezing is easy and seems to preserve freshness for my unpracticed palate
post #3634 of 4120
Freezing isn't particularly difficult...it is certainly less work than going back to the store to buy more coffee.

I already only buy half pounds most of the time (since I mostly brew at home on the weekend)...and even those last long enough that they've degraded by the end.
post #3635 of 4120
post #3636 of 4120

I figure there are guides/suggestions out there, but have y'all found a successful coffee/water mass ratio for metal filter aeropress? I'm getting my steel mesh thing in the mail shortly. I drink mostly lighter roasts because I haven't developed a palate for darker roasts and like acid/fruit in my coffee. I'm open to other suggestions and pointers, too. Thanks!

post #3637 of 4120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Principle View Post

I figure there are guides/suggestions out there, but have y'all found a successful coffee/water mass ratio for metal filter aeropress? I'm getting my steel mesh thing in the mail shortly. I drink mostly lighter roasts because I haven't developed a palate for darker roasts and like acid/fruit in my coffee. I'm open to other suggestions and pointers, too. Thanks!

Start with whatever ratio you use currently, see how you like it, and adjust to taste. I haven't substantially changed my brew parameters when I went from paper to a metal mesh filter for the Aeropress.

For freezing, if you have to do it, freeze in separate small batches (maybe enough for a week per batch) so you don't repeatedly thaw and freeze all the beans. Pack in a ziplock and try to evacuate as much air as you can, mostly to reduce the moisture the beans will see.
post #3638 of 4120

Let me rephrase that, this is my first time using my own aeropress with my own beans and grinder. I'm transitioning from a french press, which has recently had the beaker shatter. I've been doing 15-17 grams to 300 grams for the french press, does that translate to aeropress?

post #3639 of 4120

Is the pressurized extraction any more efficient?

post #3640 of 4120

I've used an Aeropress with a steel filter for 6-7 years, every day pretty much. I've tried a lot of different things, and at this point, I use a few methods, depending on what I want. I recommend starting with the Aeropress instructions--that will yield a very clean, mild cup, like an espresso with the (delicious) rough edges sanded off, and is great for Americano-style long drinks. If you want to mix it up and get a little more of the complexity present in pourover coffee, you can try some of the video tutorials that are out there. Sometimes I do it like the Japanese dude, and his method is pretty tasty as a change of pace.

 

Be forewarned, though: The Aeropress produces a coffee drink that is very, very different from that of a French press. Both have their charms, and I love them both, but they aren't really comparable.

post #3641 of 4120
i haven't used a metal filter as long as him, but i do 15-17g coffee to 200g water. brew for 1 to 1.5 minutes using the upside down method just because it's less messy. i'll adjust the parameters depending on the coffee and how i felt like it tasted last time
post #3642 of 4120
I also recommend the upside-down method
post #3643 of 4120
Quote:
Originally Posted by marvin100 View Post

I also recommend the upside-down method
...especially with a metal filter. Even the fine disk lets a fair amount through.

Thanks for the links above; it's always nice to check out some different brew techniques.

À propos de rien, here are some photos from a past nerding-out session with some fancy espresso unit in Australia:









Nice, but I still find that an E61 machine is still more than sufficient for home use.
post #3644 of 4120
isn't that also a e61 grouphead? also i recommend using the funnel thingy. sometimes it sprays when i dont
post #3645 of 4120
Quote:
Originally Posted by indesertum View Post

isn't that also a e61 grouphead? also i recommend using the funnel thingy. sometimes it sprays when i dont
Not quite; there are some slight differences between that and an E61-based machine. wink.gif

Regarding the use of a bottomless portafilter, using one has probably contributed more to improving my espresso technique than any other piece of equipment. Being able to see the shot as it develops and extracts is extremely effective at tuning in grind, dose, distribution and tamping... and the tendency to get a pinhole spraying coffee around when a screw-up happens is a strong incentive to do it right.

I've used one every time I pull a shot ever since I got it, and I'm happy to say that messy extractions have become a rare thing these days. I do keep the standard portafilter available in the drawer for guests to use, though.
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