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Lets talk about COFFEE - Page 176

post #2626 of 2635
not all coffees weigh the same either so measuring by tablespoons can be variable. But it's understandable that not everyone has (or wants to use) a scale. Just know that you can't really nail down all the brew variables without one.

The side of the bags that come from Klatch say "Measure 2 tablespoons of ground coffee per 6 ounces of water".

Stumptown's various brew guides on their website imply that one tablespoon of coffee is approx 7grams.
post #2627 of 2635
Quote:
Originally Posted by A Y View Post

I tried high ratios for a while (7.5% or 25g/330g), and I think they work best with darker roasts, because they will tend to underextract.

Are you also increasing the time the water is in contact with the grinds? If not, updosing will result in less extraction. All else equal, if you are getting underextracted coffee, you want to decrease the ratio. Updosing got popular with espresso shots, but it does not translate well to pour over unless you change other factors, such as brew time.
post #2628 of 2635
Quote:
Originally Posted by scottcw View Post

I find the golden ratio for almost any method of brewing to be 1g coffee/15g water. This works for Chemex, woodneck and Aeropress. The only variable is the grind size.

For Clever, I've been using 29g:500g water; 1:17. But I'm using a relatively fine grind on a Baratza as well.
post #2629 of 2635
Quote:
Originally Posted by scottcw View Post

Are you also increasing the time the water is in contact with the grinds? If not, updosing will result in less extraction. All else equal, if you are getting underextracted coffee, you want to decrease the ratio. Updosing got popular with espresso shots, but it does not translate well to pour over unless you change other factors, such as brew time.

He's saying he's under extracting on purpose using higher temperature water and non aeropress (probably immersion brewer instead) because he finds it works well with darker roasts that don't have a lot of acid to begin with
post #2630 of 2635
I've found that a lot of places updose to mitigate the problems of the quicker draining pour over devices (such as Hario V60). The updosing leaves you with a strong but under-extracted cup that has a lot of aroma. Sometimes that can actually taste good, but more often than not I find that it's just the strength of the coffee masking the off flavors while it's hot.

If anyone here has ever read the Blue Bottle book, there is a lot of discussion about how in Japan they use some crazy strong brewing ratios (something like 4:1 to 10:1 as opposed to the recommended 15:1 to 17:1 in America) and lower brew temps.
post #2631 of 2635
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

This is awesome, kind of like the common man's Clever. I think I recall Kevin Knox taking a liking to it on his blog.

I think he called it a variant on cowboy coffee. It seems very simple to do, and can make a large amount of coffee, too.
Quote:
Originally Posted by scottcw View Post

Are you also increasing the time the water is in contact with the grinds? If not, updosing will result in less extraction. All else equal, if you are getting underextracted coffee, you want to decrease the ratio. Updosing got popular with espresso shots, but it does not translate well to pour over unless you change other factors, such as brew time.

Yes, this is true, but brew time is not exactly the most easily controllable variable with pourover.
post #2632 of 2635
This made my day.
post #2633 of 2635
Quote:
Originally Posted by scottcw View Post

I found this on the website of one of the shops in PDX.
  • Inverted.
  • 15g coffee, 3 clicks counter clockwise from closed on a Porlex mini.
  • Pour 50 grams water, start clock, stir.
  • At 30 seconds, add water to 225 grams.
  • Screw on filter, press air out.
  • At 1:30, spin the top of the Aeropress to agitate for 15 seconds. Painful experience tip - do this over a sink.
  • Plunge into mug. Should take 15-30 seconds. If shorter, grind finer next time. If longer, grind coarser.

I found that this recipe is from Coava Coffee http://coavacoffee.com/blogs/news/9853248-aeropress.

I looked up Stumptown's guide for Aeropress, they recommend the dilution method. Tried it out this week and the results are nice. Here is my new method.
  • Inverted.
  • 16g coffee, 3 clicks counter clockwise from closed on a Porlex mini.
  • Pour 50 grams water at 190*, start clock, stir.
  • At 30 seconds, add water to 130 grams.
  • Screw on filter, press air out.
  • At 1:30, flip and plunge into mug. Should take 15-30 seconds. If shorter, grind finer next time. If longer, grind coarser. This should yield 110ml in the mug.
  • Add the same amount of hot water (110ml at 190*) to dilute 50/50. You can adjust the dilution to taste. I have read from 50-65% dilution.
post #2634 of 2635

I've been alternating between the above two methods (and a few others) to experiment recently. The first (non-dilute) gives a sharper taste profile. For lack of a better descriptor it made the coffee more sour (I used a light roast). The stumptown method still brings out the flavor but does taste a bit more mild. My preference oscillates based on time of day and other miscellaneous factors that have nothing to do with the coffee.

post #2635 of 2635
Quote:
Originally Posted by t3hg0suazn View Post

I've been alternating between the above two methods (and a few others) to experiment recently. The first (non-dilute) gives a sharper taste profile. For lack of a better descriptor it made the coffee more sour (I used a light roast). The stumptown method still brings out the flavor but does taste a bit more mild. My preference oscillates based on time of day and other miscellaneous factors that have nothing to do with the coffee.

Agreed on the taste differences.
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