or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › Lets talk about COFFEE
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Lets talk about COFFEE - Page 116

post #1726 of 2757
Peet's is probably one of the few roasters that has access to the actual JBM, unlike many other roasters who have stuff grown near the JBM farm. I tried it last year, and it's not bad for what it is, but I don't like mild coffees, especially for that kind of money.

BTW, Coffee Review is counting down their top 30 coffees of the year. Unfortunately, many were small-lot and no longer available, but some still are:

http://blog.coffeereview.com/industry-issues-and-news/best-coffees-of-2013/

From my local roaster, I had a Colombian coffee that is just beautiful (major chocolate with some florals and low acidity, and a full body), and I don't know who else roasts it, though it looks like it's from Royal, so other small roasters may be using it: http://www.royalcoffee.com/images/infosheets/Colombia%20Volcan%20de%20Tolima.pdf
post #1727 of 2757
How about the Starbucks one? I liked it.
post #1728 of 2757
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I really have no idea why people always assume single origins are God's Dick.

 

I wouldn't say that single origins are inherently better, but that they allow for more potential than blends. Most roasters blend in order to insure consistency of flavor from batch to batch, even as the green coffee they are getting in changes. For a high volume operation where customers expect consistency, blends are really the only way to go. Blending also makes it much easier to create a consistently drinkable coffee.

 

Single origins are a lot harder to get right. The recent growth in small, local, "specialty" roasters has led to a lot more single origins on the market. When they are done well, they can have a much broader range of flavors than you'll find in any blend. The problem is that roasting is hard, and roasting single origins and microlots is even harder. The vast majority of small roasters just don't have the experience to deliver a good product consistently and without blending. 

 

Personally, I try to go for single origins when I can, but that's more of a philosophical decision than a quality decision. Coffee is an agricultural product, and I believe that it's important to embrace that rather than trying to cover it up by blending so that every bag of coffee tastes the same. 

post #1729 of 2757
Quote:
Originally Posted by A Y View Post

Peet's is probably one of the few roasters that has access to the actual JBM, unlike many other roasters who have stuff grown near the JBM farm. I tried it last year, and it's not bad for what it is, but I don't like mild coffees, especially for that kind of money.
 

 

Seems a hefty price. 

 

Just finished that last Super Natural. Can't say I loved it. Maybe I just couldn't get it dialed in.

 

Been going through a weird series of odour issues lately where I'm randomly picking up on smells that no one else can. Last few days it's been an acrid smell in my living room. Had to light a cigar to mask it. This could be affecting my ability to taste.

 

lefty  

post #1730 of 2757
Might be your upper lip.
post #1731 of 2757

I checked. My upper lip says that he's been home all week.

 

lefty

post #1732 of 2757
Quote:
Originally Posted by joshuadowen View Post

Personally, I try to go for single origins when I can, but that's more of a philosophical decision than a quality decision. Coffee is an agricultural product, and I believe that it's important to embrace that rather than trying to cover it up by blending so that every bag of coffee tastes the same. 

My thoughts exactly.
post #1733 of 2757
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

How about the Starbucks one? I liked it.

Their JBM Reserve? I've never had it, but I'd trust Starbucks to get that right for that line. I think JBM is kind of overrated ...

Blends are great for espresso. I like SOs more for drip brew because their character isn't as distorted by espresso's extraction process but I've had some pretty great blends, too.
post #1734 of 2757

JBM is still too hyped. I wouldn't bother.

 

Picked up a bag of Chromatic Coffee El Sal from gocoffeego.com's black friday sale, seriously balanced sweetness and acidity. 

post #1735 of 2757
Quote:
Originally Posted by A Y View Post


Their JBM Reserve? I've never had it, but I'd trust Starbucks to get that right for that line. I think JBM is kind of overrated ...

Blends are great for espresso. I like SOs more for drip brew because their character isn't as distorted by espresso's extraction process but I've had some pretty great blends, too.

 

Really depends on the espresso machine. I recently got the chance to spend some time playing around with a Slayer. We tried a number of different single origins pulled of it that were some of the best espresso shots I've ever had.

post #1736 of 2757
Quote:
Originally Posted by A Y View Post

Their JBM Reserve? I've never had it, but I'd trust Starbucks to get that right for that line. I think JBM is kind of overrated ...

Blends are great for espresso. I like SOs more for drip brew because their character isn't as distorted by espresso's extraction process but I've had some pretty great blends, too.

Yeah, I have always enjoyed the JBM, but honestly I don't think that the price is justified.
post #1737 of 2757
I am having a really hard time with my french press lately. I can't get my coffee to not taste burnt. I have a bag of Starbucks Reserve Aged Sumatra I bought after drinking it clover brewed a bunch of times last week, but I can't get it to taste nearly as good as the clover. Granted my french press isn't $11,000, but I can't get it even close. I feel like I have tried so many different options, but I am missing the mark.

I remember AY saying that he uses much hotter water for darker beans. I feel like this is kind of flawed. I mean, if you think about it the darker roasting breaks down the cellular structure of the bean more so you shouldn't need as hot of water to act as a solvent. Green coffee is hard as a rock so lighter roasts should need hotter water to break down the structure more, no? Then again going everywhere from 196 to 205 measured on my bona vita I am getting the same results. frown.gif
post #1738 of 2757
I re-checked the brewing guides from Tim Wendelboe yesterday and was a little surprised to see he recommends 95°C for AeroPress and boiling water (i.e. ~95°C too) for French Press. For some reason I remembered him to recommend around 92°C.
post #1739 of 2757
Isn't he a Swedish guy? He's probably drinking that lightly roasted practically green coffee the Nordic countries love. I would think you need it very hot like that.
post #1740 of 2757
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I am having a really hard time with my french press lately. I can't get my coffee to not taste burnt. I have a bag of Starbucks Reserve Aged Sumatra I bought after drinking it clover brewed a bunch of times last week, but I can't get it to taste nearly as good as the clover. Granted my french press isn't $11,000, but I can't get it even close. I feel like I have tried so many different options, but I am missing the mark.

I remember AY saying that he uses much hotter water for darker beans. I feel like this is kind of flawed. I mean, if you think about it the darker roasting breaks down the cellular structure of the bean more so you shouldn't need as hot of water to act as a solvent. Green coffee is hard as a rock so lighter roasts should need hotter water to break down the structure more, no? Then again going everywhere from 196 to 205 measured on my bona vita I am getting the same results. frown.gif

 

A couple of things could be happening here. Generally, the "burnt" taste you are getting is a sign of over-extraction. There are a couple of things you can try to fix this. My first reaction would be to lower the water temp, but you seem to have played with that a fair amount. The second thing you can try is to use a coarser grind size. This lowers the rate of extraction and should give you the opportunity to stop extraction early. The third thing would be to actually press and pour your coffee earlier. I've seen a lot of people press their French press and then leave the coffee in there for a while. As long as the coffee is still in there with the ground, it's extracting.

 

If none of these things work, it's probably not you, it's the coffee.  Personally I find most Starbucks coffees taste at least a little burnt. You say you've tried it at Starbucks and enjoyed it, but freshness can play a big factor. The natural oils in coffee can do a pretty good job masking bitter and burnt flavors, but are also some of the first compounds to break down in a roasted bean. If your coffee is a little past it's prime, a lot of the other flavors will have broken down and be undetectable, so that all that's left is the bitter or burnt flavors.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › Lets talk about COFFEE