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Lets talk about COFFEE - Page 81

post #1201 of 2756
So TheShot's last 5 blog posts have been about Boston coffeehouses, because the SCAA was just in Boston the week before the marathon. He goes to two places I've mentioned before, and 2 others, one of which he considers the best, I haven't been too, but it does sound much more interesting than your typical coffeehouse.

1. Barrington, the best one. http://theshot.coffeeratings.com/2013/04/barrington-coffee-company-boston/
2. Pavement. http://theshot.coffeeratings.com/2013/04/pavement-coffeehouse-boylston-boston/
3. Thinking Cup. http://theshot.coffeeratings.com/2013/04/thinking-cup-boston-common/
4. Sip. http://theshot.coffeeratings.com/2013/04/sip-cafe-boston/

Barrington is unique for roasting moka grown in Maui. This varietal comes from Yemen, and is typically found in mocha-java blends, and most notably Peet's Arabian Mocha Sanani. I don't know anyone who uses the Maui-grown version til now. Mochas as a reference to a chocolate flavor came about when Europe first tasted chocolate, and it reminded them of coffee made from the mocha coffee bean, which has a distinctively chocolatey taste.
post #1202 of 2756
Quote:
Originally Posted by A Y View Post

So TheShot's last 5 blog posts have been about Boston coffeehouses, because the SCAA was just in Boston the week before the marathon. He goes to two places I've mentioned before, and 2 others, one of which he considers the best, I haven't been too, but it does sound much more interesting than your typical coffeehouse.

1. Barrington, the best one. http://theshot.coffeeratings.com/2013/04/barrington-coffee-company-boston/
2. Pavement. http://theshot.coffeeratings.com/2013/04/pavement-coffeehouse-boylston-boston/
3. Thinking Cup. http://theshot.coffeeratings.com/2013/04/thinking-cup-boston-common/
4. Sip. http://theshot.coffeeratings.com/2013/04/sip-cafe-boston/

Barrington is unique for roasting moka grown in Maui. This varietal comes from Yemen, and is typically found in mocha-java blends, and most notably Peet's Arabian Mocha Sanani. I don't know anyone who uses the Maui-grown version til now. Mochas as a reference to a chocolate flavor came about when Europe first tasted chocolate, and it reminded them of coffee made from the mocha coffee bean, which has a distinctively chocolatey taste.

 

I'm surprised Render Coffee Company was left out of this group.  I've been to all of the above and Render Coffee Company is as good as those listed.

 

Last time I ducked in for a Double Espresso at Barrington, I wasn't particularly Wowed.  I may need to drop by again and see what they now have to offer. 

post #1203 of 2756
What's the deal with robusta? Is it all bad? I mean nespresso claims they put a bit of it in a few of their blends that I quite like. Robusta seems to be a word for the devil in the coffee industry.
post #1204 of 2756
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

What's the deal with robusta? Is it all bad? I mean nespresso claims they put a bit of it in a few of their blends that I quite like. Robusta seems to be a word for the devil in the coffee industry.

From what I understand. Robusta beans are cheaper and more abundant. Some attribute the rubbery or earthy taste of Italian style lavazza coffee to robusta beans. If you enjoy Italian espresso, then you enjoy some measure of robusta beans.

I don't think the robusta beans are capable of the richer range of flavors of arabica, but this is all from hearsay, I myself haven't drank tons of robusta by itself.
post #1205 of 2756
Like WiredandTired says, Robusta is one of the beans used in an Italian-style espresso blend. It is said to give more body and crema to the coffee. Robusta by itself isn't well-regarded, but Indian robusta is said to be very good.

I wonder if robusta's bad reputation is due to underdevelopment of the bean or that the bean can never taste good. Arabica spans the whole spectrum from good to bad, and if you only tasted Folger's "100% arabica" coffee, you might also think Arabica is unsuitable for consumption.

In other news, we can no longer be jealous of Despos, because Tim Wendelboe is now shipping his coffee internationally for fairly reasonable prices:

https://www.timwendelboe.no/shop/
post #1206 of 2756
Robusta also contains more caffeine than arabica
post #1207 of 2756
[quote name="A Y" url="/t/153072/lets-talk-about-coffee/1200#post_6321536"
In other news, we can no longer be jealous of Despos, because Tim Wendelboe is now shipping his coffee internationally for fairly reasonable prices:
[/quote]

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From the Home Barista
Quote:
Finally, some espresso blends use Robusta coffees, which derive from a different species of coffee tree found at lower altitudes and having higher yields. These coffees are generally less expensive than the Arabicas discussed above. Low grade Robustas can add body, sweetness, and above all, very strong crema to an espresso. But they do so at the expense of having an unpleasant, burnt rubber smell. High grade Robustas do not have this offensive odor, but will usually muffle the other aromatics. Their use is controversial. Many very gifted espresso professionals use Robustas, while many others would never touch them.
post #1208 of 2756
Picked this up last week. I did not think it would be a huge difference from Chemex. I was wrong. Easily the best cup I have brewed at home.

post #1209 of 2756
Quote:
Originally Posted by scottcw View Post

Picked this up last week. I did not think it would be a huge difference from Chemex. I was wrong. Easily the best cup I have brewed at home.


What's it called, and what changes does it impart to the coffee?
post #1210 of 2756
Quote:
Originally Posted by WiredandTired View Post

What's it called, and what changes does it impart to the coffee?

Hario Woodneck. http://www.ritualroasters.com/store/woodneck/

The coffee is cleaner with no paper taste because the filter is cloth. Maybe more oils get through. The Prima Coffee description sums it up nicely, "In our opinion, cloth filter brewers are capable of brewing the best cups of coffee you’ll ever drink. The elimination of any papery taste and the thorough filtration of fines produce a crazy clean cup. We like every coffee that we've tried with this method. The most complex coffees are featured well in a cleaner cup and are best complemented by the cloth filter in the Woodneck."
post #1211 of 2756
Quote:
Originally Posted by scottcw View Post

Picked this up last week. I did not think it would be a huge difference from Chemex. I was wrong. Easily the best cup I have brewed at home.

What kind of grind are using with a cloth filter? 

post #1212 of 2756
Quote:
Originally Posted by ryogrif View Post

What kind of grind are using with a cloth filter? 

I'm using an Orphan Espresso Lido set to 2-1/4 turns counterclockwise from zero. 300ml takes 3 min.
post #1213 of 2756
Quote:
Originally Posted by A Y View Post

In other news, we can no longer be jealous of Despos, because Tim Wendelboe is now shipping his coffee internationally for fairly reasonable prices:

https://www.timwendelboe.no/shop/
What's the currency? NOK? 60€/kg?
post #1214 of 2756
It looks like Norweigian Krone, and 60€/kg sounds about right. It's probably almost 2x what you'd pay for a really good coffee in the US.
post #1215 of 2756
If you find yourselves in Honolulu, Hawaii, then you should visit Beach Bum Cafe at 1088 Bishop Street. It's downtown, so parking can be a giant PITA especially on weekdays. Try to find street parking because it's cheaper (about $1.50/hour) than the lots. I parked near Iolani Palace on Richards Street, or across the street at the post office lot.

Anyway, the espresso is good, but the stars of the cafe are its drip brew coffees made from single-origin Hawaiian-grown coffees from Isla Coffee and roasted by Rusty's Hawaiian Coffee. Isla is a high-end green coffee distributor with lots of interesting coffees. You can see some of their coffees roasted by various roasters score in the low to mid 90s on Coffee Review. These coffees are not cheap ($4+ for 8 oz cup of drip brew, $24-$33 for a half pound of beans), but they are worth it compared to the other expensive coffees you find in 3rd wave shops like Intelligentsia and Blue Bottle, because they are unique and not easily available elsewhere.

If you are on a budget, they do have cheaper coffees grown on larger farms elsewhere in Hawaii that are still tasty. They have a map of the coffee growing regions in Hawaii, and I didn't realize that almost every island grows coffee. They use a cloth filter pourover in a woodneck, which is not my favorite form of preparation as it tends to mask some of the flavors of the coffee, but it's still a very good cup of coffee.

The owner is a fan of natural or dry processing, so that's a big plus in my book already, and the staff is friendly and easy-going, like how most people who live in Hawaii are. No pretentious hipsters work here --- the staff looks like they're about to go surfing or just came from the beach. I would guess most of their customers are the business people who work downtown who just want to get in and out with their morning cup of coffee.

I had 3 different ones this week, and enjoyed them all. The first day was the Maui-grown dry process mokka peaberry I mentioned a few posts ago. It tasted like a mokka, but without the chocolatey flavors that characterizes the bean. I'm not sure that the brew got the most out of it. The 2nd day was a Yellow Caturra from Ka'u (a growing region in Kona) done in a Kenya-style raisin milling method. This was more enjoyable and a bit sweeter than the mokka, but still a little anonymous. The 3rd day I had Ka'u grown maragogype done in a dry process, and this was the best one yet: lots of interesting character, but balanced without one note sticking out, and I managed to get the last half pound they had for this season. I brewed it this morning at home in my Clever, and this is a really amazing coffee: heavy body, good sweetness, ripe peach flavors, subtle acidity. Maragogype has gigantic beans --- it's almost comically large. They also have a version of this bean that's done in the honey natural process --- these people are true coffee geeks.

If you're in the area, check them out. Selling only Hawaiian-grown coffee, including some of the best available and processed in fairly unique ways, is a unique concept for a coffee shop, and one that justifies the kind of prices 3rd wave coffee places charge. Things cost more because they are selling you a unique coffee, not some inefficient, crazy Rube Goldbergesque way of extracting coffee (eg. Blue Bottle).
Edited by A Y - 5/17/13 at 7:34pm
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