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Lets talk about COFFEE - Page 73

post #1081 of 2203
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty View Post

You certainly enjoy some of the finest lines in the country, I'll give you that.

I waited in line at BB Mint Plaza a week ago, but the previous night we didn't even wait at all for a table for 6 at Lers Ros and the food was still good! No line at the opera house for the ballet either, but then the program sucked. Then I waited in line for ice cream at Ici's the next day. The lemon ice cream sandwich thing was OK.
Quote:
Originally Posted by scottcw View Post

Outside of doing pour over at home, I have found several places that consistently serve great pour over... Four Barrel and Sightglass in SF, Stumptown in Portland and New York and Filter Coffeehouse in DC.

The Sightglass (small line) pourover was decent. It was one of their Kenyan beans I think.
post #1082 of 2203
Quote:
Originally Posted by A Y View Post

With full-immersion techniques like French press or Clever or Aeropress, you can consistently control all 4 factors. If you like full-bodied coffee, use FP. If you like paper filters and clean coffee, use the Clever or Aeropress.

Chemex with a Kone gives a fuller bodied cup, but still retains the brighter notes characteristic of a pour over. The distance between the walls of the Chemex and the Kone causes a faster extraction process than with the paper filters and you get more oils and sediment, like a smoother FP.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by A Y View Post

Agitation is stirring the coffee and water together. With pulsing (where you pour in just enough water to cover the grounds, and wait til much of it drains before pouring more), you don't have much time to stir. More stirring = more extraction. Agitation in a pourover is an indirect result of the pouring action stirring the grounds around. Again, it's not the most consistent method.
 

What's your guys' take on agitation (for those that do pour over)? I used to work at a cafe that served Phil & Sebastian (via Chemex + Kone) and I learned to agitate by stirring after pre-wetting the grounds, then circular pouring up until the max water volume, but they then changed their preferred technique to no stirring, only a few circular pours after the bloom, pouring into the middle until max water volume, but with a finer grind setting than before. 
Has anyone found a better cup with one or the other method of agitation?

post #1083 of 2203
I don't think you can get a "better" cup, but my feeling is agitating it means a quicker extraction so you need to time and choose grind accordingly.
post #1084 of 2203
Quote:
Originally Posted by ryogrif View Post

Chemex with a Kone gives a fuller bodied cup, but still retains the brighter notes characteristic of a pour over. The distance between the walls of the Chemex and the Kone causes a faster extraction process than with the paper filters and you get more oils and sediment, like a smoother FP.

I tried the first version of the Kone. Hated the results. Interesting that they are now on version 3. I will stick with the Chemex filters.


Quote:
Originally Posted by ryogrif View Post

What's your guys' take on agitation (for those that do pour over)? I used to work at a cafe that served Phil & Sebastian (via Chemex + Kone) and I learned to agitate by stirring after pre-wetting the grounds, then circular pouring up until the max water volume, but they then changed their preferred technique to no stirring, only a few circular pours after the bloom, pouring into the middle until max water volume, but with a finer grind setting than before. 

Has anyone found a better cup with one or the other method of agitation?

I sort of use the 2nd method. Pre-rinse filter with about 240ml boiling water, empty Chemex, add coffee, lightly shake Chemex to settle the grounds, circular pour ONLY for the bloom, everything stays in the middle after that. I found agitating or pouring to the sides leads to an underextracted cup, even with a finer grind. Pouring in the middle allows the coffee at the sides to form a barrier to even out extraction. In my experience, it's not good if coffee is coming down the sides of the Chemex. It should only pour directly from the bottom of the cone.

This is the method I found best for my palate after more than a year of trying various techniques. That said, there are numerous methods for Chemex that each person will swear by, so IMHO, YMMV, etc.
post #1085 of 2203
Just got this pair of Ethiopians and a nice note from Coava. I'm looking forward to the natural-process Kilenso.

post #1086 of 2203
ay what do you use to brew your coffee?
post #1087 of 2203
Clever Coffee Dripper.
post #1088 of 2203
You can smell the blueberries through the bag of the Coava Sidamo Kilenso, and I just brewed up some of the Kilenso. It smells like a blueberry muffin with chocolate chips, and it has a very pure, ripe blueberry taste with butter and cocoa notes. Medium-big mouthfeel, not much acidity. Very nice and a great example of this kind of coffee (Sidamo dry-processed), and not too expensive at $13/8.8 oz. I ordered the drip profile roast. They also have one that's roasted for espresso.
post #1089 of 2203
Do any of you use manual hand grinders? I have been using a porlex mini lately, and I am wondering if it is worth upgrading to an OE Lido? I pretty much grind coarse only for french press, but I am thinking of getting an aeropress to bring to the office (along with the porlex mini), and getting an OE Lido for at home.
post #1090 of 2203

Limited time offer: FREE Hario V60 Dripper

 

TONX is giving away a FREE Hario V60 Dripper to each new person who signs up using the following link:

 

https://tonx.org/e23c10d7

 

Supplies are limited, so sign up quick. The gift is cool, but the coffee is even better. We just increased our subscription this month to the maximum shipment.

 

You can also do a FREE trial, if you are afraid to take the plunge.


Edited by capnwes - 2/27/13 at 9:35am
post #1091 of 2203
Quote:
Originally Posted by A Y View Post

You can smell the blueberries through the bag of the Coava Sidamo Kilenso, and I just brewed up some of the Kilenso. It smells like a blueberry muffin with chocolate chips, and it has a very pure, ripe blueberry taste with butter and cocoa notes. 

 

Blueberry comes up in your descriptions often and I've tasted it in some of your recommendations. Is this a common note? Strictly Ethiopian beans? Do I want fruity coffee?

 

lefty

post #1092 of 2203
I was looking at Tonx with my g/f the other day after hearing about good experiences here and we decided not to do it. I think it is great if you live in middle america with no access to fresh good coffee, but in NYC when we walk past a stumptown every day just to get to the train the added cost of Tonx doesn't make it worthwhile, especially when they are roasting the beans right here in the city.
post #1093 of 2203
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty View Post

Blueberry comes up in your descriptions often and I've tasted it in some of your recommendations. Is this a common note? Strictly Ethiopian beans? Do I want fruity coffee?

Yes, I'd say it's exclusively Ethiopian. You will get fruit notes from coffees from elsewhere, but I don't think they will be quite as specific as this particular region of Ethiopia using this process of milling the coffee (the dry or natural process). Speaking of which, it's getting close to that time of year when Peet's will be putting out their Ethiopian Supernatural, a blueberry monster.

As for having fruit notes, I guess it's a matter of tastes and preferences. If it's well-balanced and integrated with the rest of the coffee, it's great. If it's one-notey and kind of sticks out like a sore thumb, or it's like funhouse mirrors, then it's no good.

Sometimes that can be affected by your preparation, too. On a couple of the BB Nekisse brews, I'd set my grind too fine, and while it wasn't overly bitter, the blueberry flavor had transformed into something unpleasant.
post #1094 of 2203
yergacheffe is most distinctly blueberry from my experience.
post #1095 of 2203
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I was looking at Tonx with my g/f the other day after hearing about good experiences here and we decided not to do it. I think it is great if you live in middle america with no access to fresh good coffee, but in NYC when we walk past a stumptown every day just to get to the train the added cost of Tonx doesn't make it worthwhile, especially when they are roasting the beans right here in the city.

 

I did sign up for a free sample, but doubt I'll continue for the reasons you listed. There is a hipster coffee shop across the street from me that carries ST beans so I'm good to go.

 

Blueberry - I did get it heavily in the Yergacheffe (Supernatural?) which wasn't unpleasant, but think I prefer richer caramel and chocolate tones. 

 

lefty

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