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Lets talk about COFFEE - Page 69

post #1021 of 2880
Unfortunately it isn't that easy. There are a million factors to consider. Some more info would be helpful.
post #1022 of 2880
Quote:
Originally Posted by A Y View Post

Salt is a great way to mask bitterness, like if you ever have to drink crappy restaurant espresso. Don't add very much though --- a small pinch is enough --- otherwise you get salty coffee, which is gross.
Oil coming out of beans is caused by very dark roasting, and is not a sign of freshness. Look at the dark-roasted stuff in the supermarket and you'll see the same thing.

 

Interesting. They do roast the beans darker than I like, which is why I use the salt. I'd never seen oil coming out of beans before; I figured it was related to getting them really fresh.

 

Still good coffee, though.

 

Thanks for the info.

post #1023 of 2880
Pierce, happy to help!
Quote:
Originally Posted by msg View Post

For those of you using the CCD, what's your grind setting like? I see people talking about everything from coarse enough for FP to almost espresso.

I use a pretty fine grind for my CCD, but it depends on the beans, your brewing parameters, and your tastes. One of the things I like about using paper filters is that you can use a very fine grind without getting the coffee too gritty. For some beans, a finer grind brings out more of the character of the bean.

I use a pretty conventional CCD brew: 204F, 22g beans, 360g water, pre-rinsed Filtropa (or another oxygen-cleaned paper filter, don't use the unbleached ones). Stir at 30-seconds to 1 minute, drain at 3 minutes while gently stirring. On my Hario, I start with 12 stops out from the tightest, and adjust from there. On the Capresso Infinity at home, I'm between FP grind and espresso, tending towards the espresso side --- if espresso is 100%, I'm at 70-80%, and FP grind is at 25%.

For dark roasted beans, I don't grind as fine. For lighter beans, it depends. If it's a really interesting bean with lots of character (usually an Ethiopian heirloom varietal), then I can really push the grind to very fine extremes. A lot of beans grown in the Americas are not very interesting at fine grinds, and taste much worse because the finer grind amplifies everything.

You can tell if you're getting too fine if you start getting overextraction. For me (and this seems to vary by person), this is when the aftertaste gets a metallic bitterness. When you grind very coarsely, you tend to get more of the "coffee" flavor, and less of the interesting acidic or fruit flavors. If you have crappy beans, grind coarser. This is a simplification, and different beans will do different things.

As beans age, you may want to do a finer grind because their flavors tend to mute 2 weeks post-roast.

The best way to figure this out is to get a consistent brewing process, and then only alter your grind setting. 1 or 2 clicks is plenty, especially as you start getting into the really fine range.
post #1024 of 2880
Quote:
Originally Posted by b1os View Post

If it's incredibly hard, every few months might not cut it. Why don't you get a filter?

You may as well just ask me why I don't buy spring water for my tea and coffee. Because I am cheap and lazy.
post #1025 of 2880
Quote:
Originally Posted by javyn View Post


You may as well just ask me why I don't buy spring water for my tea and coffee. Because I am cheap and lazy.

Our water is city water (misnamed in my opinion since we live in a town of only 1200), and it tastes/smells horrible. It definitely effects the taste of our coffee to the point where I won't drink it unless the water has been filtered. A Brita pitcher is an easy and inexpensive option. Makes all the difference in the world. Why spend big bucks on the best beans, and ruin them with chlorine and other chems?


Edited by capnwes - 1/9/13 at 11:22am
post #1026 of 2880
My parent's water in New Jersey is disgusting. It tastes like salty chlorinated pool water.
post #1027 of 2880
Quote:
Originally Posted by capnwes View Post

A Britta pitcher is an easy and inexpensive option. Makes all the difference in the world. Why spend big bucks on the best beans, and ruin them with chlorine and other chems?

+1. Also rinse your paper filters.
post #1028 of 2880
I wouldn't trust those small "table" waterfilters. They however do one thing very well: make the water softer.
In general, never use the filters longer than what's suggested and always store it in the fridge because it's great for mold and after the suggested "lifecycle" of the filter, it releases the filtered substances back into the water.
post #1029 of 2880
Any suggestions of spots to check out in Boston?
post #1030 of 2880
JFC. I was finally able to replace the boiler of my Silvia. icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif



First cappuccino in three months...



... time to practice latte art again! smile.gif
post #1031 of 2880
I can get a good enough micro-foam on my Pavoni to make any cool stuff- just bubbly milk for me.
post #1032 of 2880
SNL has a funny take on Starbucks's new single-serve system:

http://www.nbc.com/saturday-night-live/video/starbucks-verismo/1428979/
Quote:
Originally Posted by delirium View Post

Any suggestions of spots to check out in Boston?

Try Thinking Cup in the theater district or Pavement. They are definitely very 3rd wave, so if you don't enjoy sour, fruit bomb espressos, they may not be your cup of tea coffee.
post #1033 of 2880
Quote:
Originally Posted by A Y View Post

SNL has a funny take on Starbucks's new single-serve system:

http://www.nbc.com/saturday-night-live/video/starbucks-verismo/1428979/

Haven't been a fan of SNL in a long time, but that was funny.
post #1034 of 2880

Anybody a fan of pour over coffee? I've got a Chemex and Hario V-60 I use at home daily and I will never go back to machine drip coffee. Along with some delicious freshly roasted beans from Phil & Sebastian out of Calgary, or from Bows & Arrows out of Victoria (local for me!).

post #1035 of 2880
Quote:
Originally Posted by ryogrif View Post

Anybody a fan of pour over coffee? I've got a Chemex and Hario V-60 I use at home daily and I will never go back to machine drip coffee. Along with some delicious freshly roasted beans from Phil & Sebastian out of Calgary, or from Bows & Arrows out of Victoria (local for me!).

I make a 600ml batch using Chemex every morning on the weekends.
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