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American Cuisine - Page 6

post #76 of 82
Just thought I'd throw this in there if it hasn't been said already, Tex-Mex is what most people are thinking when they say Mexican food. It's a food developed to please the gringo palate. Burritos, "Chimichangas", and even fajitas were all first served in the US.
post #77 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by javyn
Just thought I'd throw this in there if it hasn't been said already, Tex-Mex is what most people are thinking when they say Mexican food. It's a food developed to please the gringo palate. Burritos, "Chimichangas", and even fajitas were all first served in the US.

With all due respects to late Tejana (Selena) and the National Dairy Council, Tex-Mex does a body good.

Recently (on April 18th and 19th), opinions (one of them rather passionate in its disregard for the second paragraph of post #66) on Tex-Mex were proffered by two of us in post numbers 66, 68, 69, and 70 of this thread: http://www.styleforum.net/showthread.php?t=12947
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post #78 of 82
This argument sounds a lot like the one I hear a lot about Americans having no culture. I remember whenever ethnicity would come up in high school, there would always be a sad white kid saying "I'm nothing," implying he has no culture. Of course, everyone has culture - part of this is the stuff he or she eats. Maybe Archibald only notices cuisine when it's in opposition to his own?
post #79 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing
Fried chicken variations, and fried pork chops etc. are all elements of Asian cuisine as well with the latter very present in Japanese food.

Of course, tonkatsu is itself a fusion word, ton with being one of the Japanese pronunciations for the "pork" character, and katsu being a Japanese transliteration for katsuretsu, i.e. cutlet. And, of course the pan in the panko bread crumbs used to coat tonkatsu comes from the Portuguese word for bread . . .
post #80 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by javyn
Just thought I'd throw this in there if it hasn't been said already, Tex-Mex is what most people are thinking when they say Mexican food. It's a food developed to please the gringo palate. Burritos, "Chimichangas", and even fajitas were all first served in the US.



Taco Taco burrito taco burrito burrito!!!

post #81 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Archibald
many ways can you list to prepare fried chicken in a truly American style, or other comparative sub-dishes ("starters" if you happen to frequent TGI Fridays)? Do you really think that putting fried chicken on the forefront of an argument for an American cuisine is particularly effective? .

Here is a book that will be able to answer that question better than most of us could: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/037...lance&n=283155

And about putting fried chicken "on the forefront of an argument for an American cuisine": I presume you've never tasted Scott Peacock's.
post #82 of 82
Again, new poster Archibald refuses to define the parameters of "cuisine". All the easier to deny that anything anyone says fits those unsaid parameters.

Perhaps we should set some parameters for "troll" and see if Archibald fits those.
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