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French cuff shirts in a government job. - Page 2

post #16 of 21
Yes, wear non-metal knot links if you feel a need to dress them down.
post #17 of 21
If Quebecois, continue with the French cuffs.

If non-Quebecois, change to regular cuffs immediately.
post #18 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kid609
If Quebecois, continue with the French cuffs.

If non-Quebecois, change to regular cuffs immediately.

Or, wear French cuffs, pretend to be Quebecois, and watch your career improve.
post #19 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Margaret
My studs look more or less look like the set on the left here, but I actually like this style much better, without the gold trim.

I've never seen studs before. How are the regularly worn? They look difficult to put on - are they?
post #20 of 21
I'm new here and a total late comer to the convo... but I gotta put in my 2 cents.

If you work for the government, don't ever worry about being too well dressed. I work for a civic gov, and I always dress better than my boss. I always seem to get promoted too.

It's almost like this strange, "We have to keep moving him up until he looks like he fits in" mindset.

Besides... it's not like they can ever tell you to stop dressing nice.

My dressing well, has caused a total improvement in employee wardrobes. The women in the office don't dress like the are heading to walmart on a sunday morning anymore, and the same men that used to ridicule me for my style, now secretly ask me for tips.

As for FC's... always with a tie. It really ties (no pun intended) the outfit together.

If you are worried about being too flashy with links, the studs are perfect. I tend to use them at times too.

Like I said... just my 2 cents
post #21 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by clownmitts
I've never seen studs before. How are the regularly worn? They look difficult to put on - are they?

Removable studs are usually used on the fronts of formal shirts, in place of sewn-on buttons. Though I do have one black casual collarless buttondown that uses them...

Since the studs are intended to pass through only two pieces of fabric, the shaft tends to be shorter than on a true cufflink, so they can be a bit trickier to put on. A little practice and a little patience goes a long way. I'm also lucky (?) enough to have hands that are small and flexible enough that on certain FC shirts, I can actually put the links/studs in first and then put the shirt on and stuff my hand through the cuff; it's much easier when you can use two hands to put the studs in. (Better still to have a partner who can assist you, but alas, mine rises later than I do...)

Anyway, for the first time in years, I just tried the 'overlapping' cuff method I described earlier, and I see that my memory betrayed me -- it's really not noticeably less conspicuous than the traditional cuffing method, since the overlapping cuff tends to flare away from the cuff a bit. Anyone who would care would still be able to notice that you're doing something "a bit fancy, eh?" A somewhat less conspicuous alternative is to actually insert the 'V' of one upturned end into the other before putting the link through (does that make sense?). This tightens up the whole fastening, making it less noticeable. But your most effective ally in making your french cuffs more subtle will be simple, no-fuss MOP links/studs.

But all that's just for informational purposes in case you want to experiment with other options for fun -- as others have said, just dress well and don't apologize for it.
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