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First wear polish - Page 2

post #16 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arethusa
Is the conditioner really necessary?

Probably not necessary.
However, I believe it compliments the cleaning of the shoes. The conditioner helps to remove excess dead wax / polish when it is brushed as the conditioning process is completed.
I can give full testimony that the shoes will develop a genuine glow after using the procedure for a few months.
post #17 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arethusa
Is Kiwi's leather lotion a conditioner? It's the only thing even close that I could find around here.

I have some of the Kiwi product. I find that it seems to dry a little fast and become a bit waxy quicker than either Lexoil or the AE conditioner. A shoe store selling the AE shoes will have their conditioner. The Lexoil condtiioner will be available at almost every shoe repair shop. The Lexoil cleaner is a different product.
post #18 of 30
Thread Starter 
Is it good enough? It was all I could find, and it'll likely be a while before I can worry about tracking down some Lexoil. I'm just wondering if the Kiwi stuff is even close enough to use or if I'll be doing irreparable damage to a pair of shoes if I wear them without getting ahold of some Lexoil first.
post #19 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arethusa
Is it good enough? It was all I could find, and it'll likely be a while before I can worry about tracking down some Lexoil. I'm just wondering if the Kiwi stuff is even close enough to use or if I'll be doing irreparable damage to a pair of shoes if I wear them without getting ahold of some Lexoil first.

I don't think you need to worry so. Conditioner might help a bit but it's far from essential. Just treat them right with trees and polish, and all will be fine.
post #20 of 30
I'm sure the Kiwi conditioner is fine. Where you really need a conditioner is with old shoes that have been neglected and dried out sitting in some attic somewhere. I found an old pair of brown calf wingtips that must have been sitting in my dad's closet for 20 years. They were dried, cracked, dirty and dusty. I restored them to looking fantastic.

I use Lexol cleaner and conditioner. Most here might not know that you can get the Lexol products at any Wallmart (prob Target too) at the automotive section. Guys who like to detail their cars use Lexol for leather interiors and it works great.
post #21 of 30
when i was a boy, we were taught to use saddle soap to clean and condition our soccer shoes. there was also something called 'leather food' made by patrick, a french soccer shoe company. (i think they've gone out of business.)

anyway, as an adult i've continued to use saddle soap and never shine my shoes.

so i'm reading this thread and thinking to myself that i'm going to buy some shoe cream. are there any neutral shoe creams? or how would one apply the cream on shoes with contrast stitching?
post #22 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by matadorpoeta
so i'm reading this thread and thinking to myself that i'm going to buy some shoe cream. are there any neutral shoe creams? or how would one apply the cream on shoes with contrast stitching?

Yes, it comes in neutral.
post #23 of 30
Take a look at J.M. Weston http://www.jmweston.com/.

Click "Art and the Material", then "Maintenance" and "See Video". Nice, but abbreviated, demonstration on polishing and glazing.
post #24 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arethusa
Is it good enough? It was all I could find, and it'll likely be a while before I can worry about tracking down some Lexoil. I'm just wondering if the Kiwi stuff is even close enough to use or if I'll be doing irreparable damage to a pair of shoes if I wear them without getting ahold of some Lexoil first.

Lexol (not "Lexoil") conditioner is readily found at auto supply stores, or in the car care aisle of places like Target. It isn't a necessity, but it is good to have around. It is easier to use than most of the lotion-type conditioners, because it is a lot less viscous and it is easier to buff off.
post #25 of 30
I know that this is a bit of a thread-jacking (and I apologize), but I was wondering these leather conditioners can also be applied to a leather sofa. I have one with pretty high quality leather (DWR.com), but it's drying out in places. Any advice? Again, sorry for the thread-jack...
post #26 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by arced
I know that this is a bit of a thread-jacking (and I apologize), but I was wondering these leather conditioners can also be applied to a leather sofa. I have one with pretty high quality leather (DWR.com), but it's drying out in places. Any advice? Again, sorry for the thread-jack...

Lexol should be fine for use on upholstery. I use it on my car seats and leather furniture more than on my shoes.
post #27 of 30
Quote:
Lexol should be fine for use on upholstery. I use it on my car seats and leather furniture more than on my shoes.

Thanks for the quick reply! I'll pick up a bottle...
post #28 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arethusa
When polishing before wear, how do you apply cream? How much are you supposed to use and are you supposed to let it dry before waxing or not?

I use a little bit.

I rub it on and then rub it off.

Hope this helps!
post #29 of 30
Will the AE Cleaner/Conditioner darken brown shoes at all?
post #30 of 30
It is very difficult to keep the very light tan shoes from darkening a bit. And, depending upon your likes or dislikes - that may be a good thing to add some antiquing. I've found that Lexol and AE are both pretty good about not darkening the leather. Another excellent product is the Coach line of leather condtioner and cleaner.
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