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Help on Engagement Rings - Page 3

post #31 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by aragon765 View Post
I think finger size is a large determinate of how a ring looks... a huge ring on a tiny girl looks a little too 'nichole ritchie' to me..

There are many things that can be done with the setting and the ring pairing that makes diamond rings more intersting than a massive rock, imo...
Finally someone made this point. A friend of mine just got engaged. She has a size 4 finger and the ring looked like it was over two carats to me. I didn't ask her how many carats it was because that's in poor taste IMO but she told someone it was 1.56.

It suited her finger in my opinion. I'm likely going to get engaged at some point in the next year and I've been keeping an eye out for ring ideas. I see so many women walking around with gigantic rocks on their fingers that look absolutely horrible and off-balance to me. I'm going for quality and style/design over size (my g/f agrees) but unfortunately, for many women, it appears that size is the main factor. That's a shame.
post #32 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jumbie View Post
I'm going for quality and style/design over size (my g/f agrees) but unfortunately, for many women, it appears that size is the main factor. That's a shame.

I agree with you in spirit, but it's worth noting that size is only second to cut in importance, up until a certain point. That's to say, I would get the biggest excellcent-cut diamond possible without reaching gaudy proportions, before going crazy with color and clarity.
post #33 of 42
Don't spend so much on a trivial thing like the engagement ring that you can't afford the very best when it comes to your morning coat and/or dinner jacket for the wedding.
post #34 of 42
First, +1 on Mark Turnowski and EngagementRingsDirect.com. Don't be fooled by the website; he is a master in his field and pretty much the authority on cushion cuts. I used him and he was marvelous to work with. He spent over an hour with us when we visited his NYC office just talking about cuts and quality, and then FedExed stones back and forth to Boston (my residence at the time) when I was ready to purchase. Also note that he has access to everything in BlueNile's database.

Second, +1 on PriceScope.com. If you can wade through the "OMG WOW THAT'S PRETTY!" type posts, the ladies (and gents) there know their stuff.

Third, +1 for avoiding flashy rings. I don't think it gets much classier than a nice 1.0-2.0 carat solitaire setting. Luckily, my wife agrees.
post #35 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by max power View Post
First, +1 on Mark Turnowski and EngagementRingsDirect.com.

Leon Mege, also in NYC, does fantastic custom work, specializing in pave and micro-pave--all hand-wrought, not molded. He does a lot of work for designers and big brands; I suspect that Cellini uses him, but charges 20 percent more. His website: artofplatinum.com.
post #36 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post
Leon Mege, also in NYC, does fantastic custom work, specializing in pave and micro-pave--all hand-wrought, not molded. He does a lot of work for designers and big brands; I suspect that Cellini uses him, but charges 20 percent more. His website: artofplatinum.com.
+1 yet again. We actually used Leon for the (non-pave) setting. Another master who is wonderful to work with. EDIT: Mark T. is also doing custom settings now, as I understand from a friend who used him and was very pleased.
post #37 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by max power View Post
+1 yet again. We actually used Leon for the (non-pave) setting. Another master who is wonderful to work with.

But pricey. I went with him as well, but only after learning that most jewelers use molds and it's rare to find someone that still fabricates by hand. The latter makes for a far finer finish at the end, especially when it comes to pave.

Quote:
Originally Posted by max power View Post
EDIT: Mark T. is also doing custom settings now, as I understand from a friend who used him and was very pleased.

Right, but his price point is much lower than Mege's. It's all done by wax mold, which is fine, but tends to be less delicate looking. Also, since the holes for the pave diamonds are uniformely molded rather than individually cut, they're less secure and there will be more metal showing.
post #38 of 42
I used Van Craeynest in San Francisco for both the engagement setting and matching wedding band. They employ a similar method of hand fabrication rather than wax molds which Mafoofan and Max Power mention. I believe part of the process is called die-struck where somehow they compress the platinum under tons of pressure and the latter handfinishing steps are referred to as carving, chasing, and hand engraving. I'll try to post pics of both settings.
post #39 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post
A good asssher is cut deep and fat, so they face up pretty small--an unfortunate consequence for the wallet.

Pound for pound, an asscher costs about 10-20% more than a round brilliant. At least that's what my guy told me. Maybe he's still laughing at me.
post #40 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by LesterSnodgrass View Post
Pound for pound, an asscher costs about 10-20% more than a round brilliant. At least that's what my guy told me. Maybe he's still laughing at me.

Well, to get the same face-up surface area, you have to spend more for an asscher--but I think carat for carat, round brilliants are the priciest. Of course, it's a different ball game if you're talking about real Royal Asscher cut diamonds.
post #41 of 42
I don't recall what size I got, but it is small enough to make sure my wife doesn't have to bother telling people she married beneath her.
post #42 of 42
I know this fellow might be on his second wife by now, however he might consider traveling to Montevideo, Uruguay Sao Paulo (even Rio) and Buenos Aires for such jewelry. When their economies were in doldrums, there was a fire-storm on all "white goods." Its a bonus that each country went through a heyday during the early twentieth century, and there was a huge affinity for the art deco aesthetic there. The prices have no doubt risen commensurate with their economies improving, but there is still ample supply. There are several small auctions that cater to these, so one could find an agent, provide them a budget, and see what they find.
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