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What's your personal style? - Page 2

post #16 of 38
I like the Neopolitan look- soft, natural shoulder Italian style. As discussed before, I own quite a bit of Zegna, but also like Barbera, Isaia, and of course Kiton. Give my current means I have to do a lot of bargain hunting to afford what I like. However, I do also like some English and updated traditional influences just for some variety. And Aloha shirts. If everyone wore them to work like they do in the Islands, how many Worldcoms and Enrons would we have? How can you cheat somebody wearing a Hawaiian shirt? Foxx and Stu- for business casual a good quality merino wool or cashmere polo looks great under a suit or sportcoar sans tie and is easy to do. Just pick up a knit or two while you're buying the usual shirt and tie with a tailored clothing ensemble. For everday casual, solid dark casual slacks always work, with a subtle plaid, houndstooth or tattersall to match. If you like color, a lot of brands are making some really nice stuff these days, soft fabrics with great hands. And if it's cold out, a solid color sweater of a different matching color than the slacks finishes the look nicely. If you want edgy casual, I defer to LA Guy, Renwick and PStoller.
post #17 of 38
I tend to build my wardrobe with items that will remain stylish for years. When buying clothes I ask; what will I wear this with, where will I wear it, will I wear it next year? This prevents me from making impulse purchases and allows me to spend more on the items I really want. As a result I end up buying clothes that aren't too ostentatious, but have understated elegance. Such items are my Henry Cottons distressed brown leather jacket, Emporio Armani Navy overcoat, Valentino black suit, high quality dress shirts that can be worn casually and formally (Ike Behar, Gucci, ect...) Ferragamo chelsea boots. I'm pretty much a jeans guys, though I like to dress them up and contrast my pair of ripped PDC jeans with a nice sportcoat. I've been accused of dressing "european," which I'm guessing means "nicer and more formal than American casual," but definatly not eurotrash. A night out for me means a nice button down paired with jeans.
post #18 of 38
I mainly stick with a more "classic" look, mainly a 1950's type. I'm always on the look out for 50's styled suits and "casual" wear- The so called camp shirts, slacks, skinnier ties with embroidery, etc. I take the ques from old movies, my forte so to speak. I'm a big Sinatra fan and keep an eye out for Rat Pack type clothing as well. For a more casual look I swing toward a rockabilly type look, again more 50's, with Levi's, the boots, the whole nine yards. I'm also a fan of the "mafia" look. Mainly Silvio and Paulie on "The Sopranos." and DeNiro in any of his mob films. Even Uncle Junior has given me ideas. This look can be hard to pull off because it's hard too look relaxed and casual. It looks like you're dressed up in a costume. But it can be a pretty cool look. Because of all this I've been accused many times of wearing "old man's clothes." I just think its a throw back to the days when most men took pride in their appearance instead of wearing Metallica shirts, sweat pants and beat up baseball caps everywhere.
post #19 of 38
I would call my style "urban prep" if that makes any sense. I wear a lot of classic pieces, but with an edge to them, I guess. I wear a lot of Jil Sander, Helmut Lang, and Calvin Klein.
post #20 of 38
Preppy Fusion, maybe? Most of the stuff I wear is stuff I've been wearing and people I know have been wearing for a long long time...Paul Stuart, Orvis, whatever. The rest and is slightly different: Etro, maybe conservative Dolce & Gabbana, some Ferragamo, CP Company, that sort of thing.
post #21 of 38
I guess you would call it 30's elegance with an Italian flavor. Suits with an unpadded shoulder and a very light canvas - I lust after Anderson & Sheppard & Caraceni but I make do with Isaia. Double breasted 6 x 2 or single breasted 3 button, preferably with matching vest. I love ticket pockets. I like grey and brown suits best - birds-eyes, plaids, even the occasional chalk-stripe. I am partial to dark antique brown shoes. Usually Edward Green or Lobb cap-toes although I do have a couple pair of Mantellassi's I wear with sportcoats. I like light-to-medium-blue dress shirts best but I am also fond of yellow and pink. I love checked shirts and the occasional contrast collar. Wide, deep spread collars or a long point collar worn with a collar pin. And, of course, French cuffs. I wear woven ties almost exclusively. Usually polka dot, houndstooth, plaid or repp stripe. Ties have to have rich color or I won't touch them. I love green ties. And I usually give them a lift with one of my 100 year old cravatte pins. I feel naked without a pocket square and I have entirely too many socks. But probably my favorite thing of all? I rarely pay more than 20 cents on the retail dollar for anything. Ebay, outlets, consignment shops - these are wonderful places.
post #22 of 38
andrew....great post. i see you are one of the True Clotheshorses. a curse (on the wallet), to be sure, but as Maus and Hoffman put it "Dressing well is the Best Revenge". curious, what city do you live/ work in? also, did you glean your sense of style from the books by flusser, boyer, etc?
post #23 of 38
Quote:
I guess you would call it 30's elegance with an Italian flavor. Drape cut suits - I lust after Anderson & Sheppard & Caraceni but I make do with Isaia. Double breasted 6 x 2 or single breasted 3 button, preferably with matching vest. I love ticket pockets. I like grey and brown suits best - birds-eyes, plaids, even the occasional chalk-stripe. I am partial to dark antique brown shoes. Usually Edward Green or Lobb cap-toes although I do have a couple pair of Mantellassi's I wear with sportcoats. I like light-to-medium-blue dress shirts best but I am also fond of yellow and pink. I love checked shirts and the occasional contrast collar. Wide, deep spread collars or a long point collar worn with a collar pin. And, of course, French cuffs. I wear woven ties almost exclusively. Usually polka dot, houndstooth, plaid or repp stripe. Ties have to have rich color or I won't touch them. I love green ties. And I usually give them a lift with one of my 100 year old cravatte pins. I feel naked without a pocket square and I have entirely too many socks. But probably my favorite thing of all? I rarely pay more than 20 cents on the retail dollar for anything. Ebay, outlets, consignment shops - these are wonderful places.
Damn, are you sure you're not my doppleganger? Great post (and you're right Caraceni is wonderful, I got incredibly lucky and got one, single, sportscoat, but if I had the funds......)
post #24 of 38
Thanks Russ and Thracozaag. I live in Atascadero CA, halfway between LA and San Francsico. Right down the hill from San Luis Obispo if you have ever heard of it. I do most of my shopping in San Francisco because you can hit 12 or more discount or consignment stores in the same day. LA is too spread out to do that. I certainly have been influenced by Flusser, Boyer etc. Although probably by Flusser more than Boyer. But most of all I have learned what I like as a result of selling on ebay. I've been selling high-end menswear for three years now. In that time I've been fortunate enough to get my hands on suits and accessories from nearly every skilled needle in the world. A few key pieces have eluded me (Attolini, Gianni Campagna, Caraceni, Knize and a few others) but for the most part I've seen it all. In that time I've kept a lot of it for myself. It's a cool job because I can buy a suit, wear it a few times, decide I don't like the cut, and then sell it for a profit.. As a result my wardrobe is more compact than you might imagine. Anything that isn't perfect gets put on the sale rack before too long. Especially when I'm broke.     I'm sure you guys know the feeling. You put on something that looked great on someone else and it doesn't look right on you. Or you really dislike certain things, even if they are "correct." I found Alan Flusser's latest book fascinating because it explained exactly why I like and dislike certain things. Certain colors, certain cuts, certain patterns etc. He explained in a very logical way why all the things I like look good on me. Very interesting. Have you guys read it?
post #25 of 38
Hey, I did't realise that Flusser released a new book. Could you advise the name and the publisher of that book? Thanks
post #26 of 38
yes, have been working on the new flusser book ("Dressing the Man: mastering the art of permanent fashion"....full details on the book at www.amazon.com, just search for books by flusser). a LOT to get thru, but am certainly enjoying it. andrew, have you been to NYC's saks fifth ave & bergdorf goodman yet? saks has a bunch of 1930s stills from apparel arts on the wall outside the elevator on mens tailored clothing floor. i got a TON of ideas from my recent trip to the big apple. by the way, does anyone get the magazine by american express, Departures? i saw about 10 online articles from the magazine dealing with fine tailored clothing, the top mens stores, etc.
post #27 of 38
Foxx: I'd be interested in reading the AOL article. Could you post the link? Thanks Steve
post #28 of 38
guys-- here's the link to departures magazine articles on style....worth checking out, too bad there are no photos. http://www.departures.com/FA_template_ind.html
post #29 of 38
Personal style...hmm. Call it psychotic classicist. I wear a lot of classical-type pieces: -Saville Row/Neapolitan/Viennese-cut jackets, often with ticket pockets -properly double-pleated and cuffed wool trousers -cashmere and camelhair overcoats -pocket squares invariably placed in the breast pockets of my jackets and overcoats -shirts (often bespoke) with double cuffs and spread or cutaway collars; monochromatic jumpers -seven fold ties -bal captoe oxfords in black calfskin and burgundy shell cordovan, along with plenty of monkstraps and loafers; etc. Hell, I even own a morning coat. Jeans I consider part of the classicist wardrobe, too. Although I do own a pair of modern distressed jeans (Energie), I wear them less often than I do my solid dark indigo ones (Sisley and Salvatore Ferragamo). (The pairing of the Energie jeans that looks best to me? Velvet morning coat, untucked formal shirt, either black patent Tod's driving mocs or minimalist spectator wingtips from Gucci S/S 2002.) BUT except for formal events I never stay in the classicist realm. I always use eyewear as a point of contrast. I have no use for conservative frames. Also, many of those conservatively-cut shirts are massively striped, with the bespoke ones often having patterns rotated at odd angles from vertical. (But pattern-matching is still a given, of course. I like to think that I've caused my favourite shirtmaker, Zum Jockey Club in Vienna, to laugh more often than I've caused them to cry.) I rarely tuck them in, even when wearing a suit. One of those cashmere jumpers (a Loro Piana) is bright orange with lime green sleeves. Also, I can be subversive in my shoe choice: I'd not think twice about pairing, say, Tod's bowling shoes with my bespoke Knize suit. (I would NEVER wear black shoes with this blue suit or any other one, though.) In terms of designers, I have a soft spot for Paul Smith, Etro, and Tod's on one side, Hermes, Ferragamo, and Ludwig Reiter on the other. What brings it all together? Obviously, I only buy pieces that fit me. After that, the big unifying factor is materials quality. I won't wear anything that doesn't feel good as well as look good. Following materials comes tailoring quality. Where'd it come from? My father is a pure classicist dresser. He's been in the foreign ministry most of his life and dresses the part. My grandfathers were also both Oxford-educated "colonial" gentleman with a touch of Anglophilia. So the roots were there, but I pretty much developed the "f-you" streak on my own. Books haven't really influenced me, but they have answered questions that I wouldn't bother to pester Abu about. Peace, JG
post #30 of 38
Why oh why is mens fashion considered permanent? I agree, it changes less drastically than womens fashion but still, the change is there and should be accounted for. On a totally seperate note, I was in Italy and found that the much revered Energie brand is worth NOTHING, considered trashy, in Italy... This surprised me, and I'm sure will surprise you. European Interloper
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