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Top six books for you - Page 7

post #91 of 174
Quote:
Originally Posted by Strombollii View Post
Sorry, but isn't everything Joyce has written absurdly masturbatory and egoistic? The man has an awing command of the English language, but Ulysses and what little I've read of Finnegan's is most certainly absolute literary masturbation at its most elegant.

I dunno about elegant, and i'm almost through all of Finnegans (no ', sorry it's a pet peeve). I'd say eloquent? To an extent, yes it's masturbatory and egotistic, but at the same time isn't any process of creation a work of fiction arguably for self gratification and affirmation from others? This isn't to say that Joyce isn't more explicit than others about this, but I like to think it's more a balance of his egotism and a sense of humor. As i've said already, he makes fun of himself and even solely serious readings of his work all throughout his work. Further, I think that getting hung up on his egotism and aesthetic achievement is to cut short what he is also doing with the novel as well as what he is saying about life. I completely understand the argument that Joyce is what Woolf called 'an adolescent scratching his pimples,' or something to that effect, but I think even Woolf couldn't get over her sensibilities and read Joyce for what he was trying to say in addition to playing around with form and language.

Woolf on the other hand... I love her and I've been very deeply affected in particular by To The Lighthouse in a way similar to how Prufrock and Henry James' "Beast in the Jungle" moved me, but a character can't move from one room to the next without contemplating the entirety of the human condition and the infinite regression of history and memory, etc. etc.

I +1000 the anything by Eric Carl as well as The Boxcar Children and Encyclopedia Brown books. And From the Mixed up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler (sp?)

Any love for EM Forster or DH Lawrence?
post #92 of 174
I'm not as developed as you fellows, but so far these are my favorite

The Lord of the Rings/The Silmarillion
Flatterland
The Old Man and the Sea
Atlas Shrugged
I, Robot
Rendezvous with Rama (the whole series)
post #93 of 174
Quote:
Originally Posted by RJman View Post
That's most of early 20th-century naturalism right there. Read some Zola, or Thomas Mann's Buddenbrooks...

Hmmm, if we have Teger read Proust, would he leave the forum a while?

I have read proust

and teh lost generation?????
post #94 of 174
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teger View Post
teh lost generation?????



For me, modernism is the crowning achievement of literature. Not to dismiss anything before or after, but nothing since has quite been the same.
post #95 of 174
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnGalt View Post
Atlas Shrugged
The Fountainhead
A Brief History of Time
Brave New World
Into Thin Air
Hamlet

I had an objectivist ask me for free advice today.
post #96 of 174
where the wild things are holes o, the places you will go marley and me the summons anything from the "wheres waldo" series /lol see my previous post in this thread
post #97 of 174
The Abolition of Man - C.S. Lewis Nietzsche's complete works The End of History and the Last Man - Francis Fukuyama Goethe's selected works Society and Solitude - Ralph Waldo Emerson The Road to Serfdom - F.A. Hayek The Lexus and the Olive Tree - Thomas Friedman Shadows and Wind: A View of Modern Vietnam - Robert Templer More than six, but these are what matter to me.
post #98 of 174
The Crisis of the Negro Intellectual
Invisible Man
Christmas Carol
I forget the name but one of those Judy Blume books.
The House of Morgan
The Philosophy and Opinions of Marcus Garvey
post #99 of 174
Six books that have had an influence on me:

The Moon is a Harsh Mistress - Robert A. Heinlein
Education of a Wandering Man - Louis L'Amour
The Hardy Boys series - Franklin W. Dixon
The Illiad - Homer
Dorsai - Gordon R. Dickson
Love and Glory - Robert B. Parker

Not necessarily classic literature, but books I liked and that shaped my worldview.
post #100 of 174
My Top 6 are:
The Holy Bible (King James)
Gulag Archipelago by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn (all 3 volumes, if allowed)
Papillon by Henri Charrière (tandemly- Dry Guillotine by René Belbenoit)
Alive: The Story of the Andes Survivors by Piers Paul Read
Day Of The Jackal by Frederick Forsyth
A Tree Grows In Brooklyn by Betty Smith
post #101 of 174
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bradford View Post
Six books that have had an influence on me:

The Moon is a Harsh Mistress - Robert A. Heinlein

Oh, another SF classic! He'd attempted a very similar theme in an earlier book called The Fifth Column, but it was too ambitious for his talent level/experience at that point. (This is assuming you aren't a serious Heinlein fan; if you are, then you know this, and my apologies!) Absolutely underappreciated, in my opinion, though I still think Starship Troopers is a better book (and a pretty crappy, if fun, movie).
post #102 of 174
Quote:
Originally Posted by fairholme_wannabe View Post
Gilead --Marilyn Robinson
The Humanity of God --Karl Barth
The Brothers Karamozov --Dostoevsky
In the Penal Colony --Kafka (short story)
Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee --Dee Brown
The Puppet & the Dwarf --Slavoj Zizek

Yes! That is my favorite Kafka story.
post #103 of 174
All you people listing the Bible know you aren't running for office, right?
post #104 of 174
Quote:
Originally Posted by munchausen View Post
All you people listing the Bible know you aren't running for office, right?



God (or unGod if you prefer) forbid we have some politicians in office who follow a philosophy of tolerance. Setting aside questions of theism, the New Testament is full of some pretty sound philosophy.
post #105 of 174
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teacher View Post
Oh, another SF classic! He'd attempted a very similar theme in an earlier book called The Fifth Column, but it was too ambitious for his talent level/experience at that point. (This is assuming you aren't a serious Heinlein fan; if you are, then you know this, and my apologies!) Absolutely underappreciated, in my opinion, though I still think Starship Troopers is a better book (and a pretty crappy, if fun, movie).

I am a pretty serious Heinlein fan, so I did know that. I definitely debated between The Moon... and Starship Troopers. Love pretty much all of his work.

I also thought about listing the entire Future History series, but that kind of went against the idea of just six books.
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