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Your favorite Kung Flu flick - Page 3

post #31 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian SD
Well, considering that there is no real one definitive style from China (unlike Karate from Japan, Muay Thai from Thailand, TKD from Korea), they all just get lumped into Kung Fu, which essentially means "Chinese martial arts," do you agree? But I agree, when I tell people that I study Wushu, they say what's that? I say, Kung fu!

Didn't the phrase "Kung Fu" just get popularized because of the TV series?

I wouldn't be surprised if that was the origins of its popularity; there's also that nintendo game that is so addicting.

I think Wushu is actually a broader way of describing martial arts in China; it covers everything from hand to hand combat to weapons fighting by soldiers. But yes, I interpreted Kung Flu as any type of human against human fighting. (some movies, of course, include the supernatural, so them as well).
post #32 of 70
I dont know if its my favorite but Jet Li's Romeo Must Die I thought was a cool fusion of Kung Fu and Hip Hop. Aaliyah was the love interest in it shortly before her untimely death.

The clothes in that movie are Hip and very well done.
post #33 of 70
I'm not a Kung Fu fan at all, but "Riki-Oh - The Story of Ricky" has to be the funniest Kung Fu movie in the history of the universe.
post #34 of 70
Thread Starter 
Gotta love the gang of four.
post #35 of 70
Without a doubt my favorite Kung Fu movie of all time is "The Last Dragon". Nobody does Kung Fu like Bruce Leeroy.
post #36 of 70
1976's Death Chamber (aka Siu lam ji, aka Shaolin Temple) starring the late Alexander Fu Sheng and directed by the legendary Cheh Chang.

I call it the "Chinese Alamo". Basically, the emperor launches an all-out assault against the Shaolin Temple and the monks fight back in a losing cause. Nothing short of brilliant and it has more Shaw Brothers stars per minute of movie than any other the studio turned out. It was finally released on DVD recently. Apparently it was remade with Jet Li but I consider a remake of this movie to be blasphemy. You know, as if someone wanted to remake The Seven Samurai...

A related movie is Five Masters of Death -- another classic -- which tells of what happened to several of the characters after the temple fell.
post #37 of 70
Quote:
You know, as if someone wanted to remake The Seven Samurai...

ugh.

Don't even get me started. First the blatant (and unauthorized rip off) that was The Magnificent Seven (even though it was enjoyable in its own right, it was basically STOLEN by Leone)

Then Samurai 7, which is a pretty decent Anime, but not nearly as meaningful or relevant, more action/sci-fi/graphic one-upsmanship.

Now the W bros. want to ruin it like they ruin everything else they touch. Damn the Matrix, and damn its horrible, cliche, blunt, boring, and pointless sequels.


WHY CAN WE NOT JUST LEAVE BRILLIANT MOVIES ALONE???

I'm going to remake Casablanca with Ben Stiller as Rick, Paris Hilton as Ilsa, Adam Sandler as Victor Lazlo, Tom Green as Captain Renault, and Chris Rock or Chris Tucker as Sam. (depending solely on who's cheaper)

Micheal Bay will be directing it, Jerry Bruckheimer will produce.
post #38 of 70
I love Jet Li's "Kung Fu Cult Master". I believe it is based on the series "Heaven Sword and Dragon Sabre". Though not as good as the series, Jet Li is pretty awesome in it.
post #39 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tokyo Slim
WHY CAN WE NOT JUST LEAVE BRILLIANT MOVIES ALONE???

As Tom Cruise's character said in Vanilla Sky -- ah, ah the irony of quoting a remake -- the answer to 99 out of 100 questions is money. I love capitalism but sometimes people go too far.
post #40 of 70
Thread Starter 
Tokyo I love how Kurosowa and the old westerns borrowed from each other so much. Everything Kurosawa has done has been ripped off btw. Star Wars, Usual Suspects, Last Man Standing, etc etc etc BTW anyonere here into the Lone Wolf & Cub series? Talk about BAD ASS!!!
post #41 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by gorgekko
You people need to shield me from such things! I mean a rip off of Shichinin no Samurai is one thing but a remake....AAAAAAAAARGH! P.s. Kurosawa was a big fan of Tom Ford's work.
post #42 of 70
Let us also remember that several of Kurosawa's greatest works were storylines cribbed from Shakespeare I've read that Kurosawa, though respected, isn't beloved in Japan because many saw him as a "Western" (as in the geography, not the genre) director. Nice avatar skalogre, I just watched Ikiru last night!
post #43 of 70
Quote:
Now the W bros. want to ruin it like they ruin everything else they touch. Damn the Matrix, and damn its horrible, cliche, blunt, boring, and pointless sequels. WHY CAN WE NOT JUST LEAVE BRILLIANT MOVIES ALONE???
Wachowski Brothers are Matrix, not Weinstein, right?
post #44 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian SD
Wachowski Brothers are Matrix, not Weinstein, right?

Ah good call. I was temporarily confused by my hatred for the idea of remaking Seven Samurai.

But the Matrix(s) still sucked.
post #45 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by gorgekko
Let us also remember that several of Kurosawa's greatest works were storylines cribbed from Shakespeare I've read that Kurosawa, though respected, isn't beloved in Japan because many saw him as a "Western" (as in the geography, not the genre) director. Nice avatar skalogre, I just watched Ikiru last night!
Correct on both, Gorgekko . Throne of Blood is an adaptation of Macbeth. But Kurosawa adapted several Tolstoy stories, also, as welll as some films which were inspired by detective novellas. Many disparate sources. But he worked with the same scriptwriter(s) for decades - their tastes were rather eclectic. As for the western thing, that accussation was levelled against him many times. I believe Ozu is/was looked at as the archetype of a proper Japanese filmmaker, while Kurosawa was thought of as too western - diluted. My understanding is that a lot of it was due to domestic critics being uncomfortable with the success he had - and bemusement on how he could possibly be that Japanese in style if the foreign devils ( ) liked his work that much. In both his autobiography "Something like an autobiography" and "The Emperor and the Wolf: The Lives and Films of Akira Kurosawa and Toshiro Mifune " by Galbraith there are allussions to this fact. Don't remember exact quotes though. I do have another book on Kurosawa by a Japanese filmcritic/academician (don't remember the name) that I have not yet finished in whichy he does treat many of The Emperor's works in more dismissive terms... Oh, and Ikiru is one of ,if not, my favourite films of all times Edit: I should add that I have seen far too many of his films to offer an unbiased opinion but I do not think he is as "western" as the Japanese media made him out to be. He did indeed love French New Wave, film noir (which is basically a German genre made in USA) and old Westerns - all of which coloured his creations. Kurosawa had made digs in the past - in one case directed towards Ozu - regarding the conformity and blandness of the domestic productions. He did once mention that a lot of films at that time were like green tea over rice, which happens to be the name of an Ozu film. If I recall it correctly, that is something usually given to people when they are ill as it is very plain food... I have liked all of Ozu's films I have seen so far myself.
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