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Wine Glasses - Page 4

post #46 of 73
I just bought a pair of Vinum malt whisky glasses this weekend. Cut lip, very thin. I'm trying to find a pair of their "spirits" nosing glass now.
post #47 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post
I just bought a pair of Vinum malt whisky glasses this weekend. Cut lip, very thin. I'm trying to find a pair of their "spirits" nosing glass now.

how hard are you trying?
post #48 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by gomestar View Post
how hard are you trying?

Oh, forgot to mention I got the malt glasses for $16 for the pair? That's about what I want to pay for the nosers
post #49 of 73
I'm curious about the lip of the glass and why so many people claim cut glass is better than a rolled edge.
post #50 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Milhouse View Post
I'm curious about the lip of the glass and why so many people claim cut glass is better than a rolled edge.

a few things I suspect:
- consistency. My cheap-o glasses don't have a perfectly uniform lip and this could certainly affect how a wine enters the mouth and thus affect its 'attack'. Excessive care for most wines, but I wouldn't want an errant glass nub affecting a truly fine bottle
- It looks better
- It might even be necessary in production when you have the super-thin walls
- it's a sign that the maker took an extra step to make the glass
post #51 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by gomestar View Post
a few things I suspect: - consistency. My cheap-o glasses don't have a perfectly uniform lip and this could certainly affect how a wine enters the mouth and thus affect its 'attack'. Excessive care for most wines, but I wouldn't want an errant glass nub affecting a truly fine bottle
+1, even if you swish the wine/liquor in your mouth after, if it hits your tongue improperly you will get too much alcohol influence and be unable to extract nuance. Cut rims are better at directing liquids, rolled rims tend to spray haphazardly
post #52 of 73
Also, I do not like the way a rolled lip feels when my mouth touches it; but like ama said, it's mostly about the flow of the liquid into your mouth.
post #53 of 73
I haven't done a side by side comparison, but it seems to me that a rolled rim smothers the more subtle flavors of a wine.
post #54 of 73
I've owned a lot of different styles and we tend to use stemless the most for casual dinning. My favorite stemless are made in San Miguel Mexico from recycled glass. Artisans then take the glass and etch it with traditional designs. These are about the size of a traditional Italian or French Cafe or Bistro type glass. We use them with rustic looking Italian glazed ceramicware. We drink mostly white wines. For red, they make a stemless larger globe shape that is quite nice too.
post #55 of 73
Ok, so cut glass directs liquid better? Is it about the flow of the liquid being more or less laminar?
post #56 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Milhouse View Post
Ok, so cut glass directs liquid better? Is it about the flow of the liquid being more or less laminar?

Cut is the only way to go. Technically it would be more laminar with a cut glass, but I don't think oenophiles think of it that way.

I also dishwash my Riedels. I put the dishwasher on a lighter setting, make sure the glasses are stable and far from one another and let it go.
post #57 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Milhouse View Post
Ok, so cut glass directs liquid better? Is it about the flow of the liquid being more or less laminar?

That's a good question, and I don't know the answer.
post #58 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by HORNS View Post
That's a good question, and I don't know the answer.

That's exactly what it does. It keeps crap from accumulating at the rim or lip. Also, there's a lot of joy in looking at wine and when you have a nice glass with a nasty edge, that takes away from it. Part of the reason you hold a glass by the stem.
post #59 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by ramuman View Post
Cut is the only way to go. Technically it would be more laminar with a cut glass, but I don't think oenophiles think of it that way.
Those who are engineers do. I also prefer the feel to a bulbous rolled edge. ~ H
post #60 of 73
If you don't require four reds and four whites (such as with the Reidel Target set), you can buy glasses individually at World Market for ~$10 each. Completely adequate.
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