or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Entertainment and Culture › The best "working" American Filmmakers.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

The best "working" American Filmmakers. - Page 4

post #46 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fuuma View Post
Boogy night is nice though, it's like a light Scorsese and DePalma spoof. Not at their level but quite entertaining.
I agree that it could be entertaining if you watch BN as a Scorsese spoof or Magnolia as an Altman spoof. That said, they weren't spoofs, just awful knock-offs, and they weren't funny either - so they fail in the spoofy department as well.
post #47 of 59
Lynch, Scorsese, Allen, Coens, Jonze, Tarantino
post #48 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdl203 View Post
I agree that it could be entertaining if you watch BN as a Scorsese spoof or Magnolia as an Altman spoof. That said, they weren't spoofs, just awful knock-offs, and they weren't funny either - so they fail in the spoofy department as well.

How do you see Boogie Nights as an unintentional Scorsese spoof (ripoff)? I'm seriously curious, because I don't see it that way at all.
post #49 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teacher View Post
How do you see Boogie Nights as an unintentional Scorsese spoof (ripoff)? I'm seriously curious, because I don't see it that way at all.

Watch Mean Streets and Goodfellas, watch the end of Raging Gull, then watch Boogie Nights - and tell me what you think. People have been writing essays about PTA's tendency to freely "borrow", from Scorsese and Altman particularly so I wouldn't do justice to their analysis but here are the main points I would make: (a) cinematographic/stylistic choices borrowed from MS (e.g. slow-mo, extreme close-ups, dolly shots, long tracking shots); (b) overall treatment of the 1980s aesthetic and themes as Casino or Goodfellas.

Literally, the opening shot of BN with the long tracking shot down the street and ending on slow-mo Wahlberg is pure Scorsese.
post #50 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdl203 View Post
Watch Mean Streets and Goodfellas, watch the end of Raging Gull, then watch Boogie Nights - and tell me what you think. People have been writing essays about PTA's tendency to freely "borrow", from Scorsese and Altman particularly so I wouldn't do justice to their analysis but here are the main points I would make: (a) cinematographic/stylistic choices borrowed from MS (e.g. slow-mo, extreme close-ups, dolly shots, long tracking shots); (b) overall treatment of the 1980s aesthetic and themes as Casino or Goodfellas.

Literally, the opening shot of BN with the long tracking shot down the street and ending on slow-mo Wahlberg is pure Scorsese.

Hmmm...you may have a point. But I dunno; you know what they say about how many new things there are under the sun. There are plenty of current directors and cinematographers whose works could be linked to the likes of Chaplin, Fritz Lang, Demille, etc. etc. In some respects, Hitchcock borrowed heavily from Ford and admitted it. I wonder what most people would consider to be the distinction between ripping off and simply being influenced.
post #51 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teacher View Post
Hmmm...you may have a point. But I dunno; you know what they say about how many new things there are under the sun. There are plenty of current directors and cinematographers whose works could be linked to the likes of Chaplin, Fritz Lang, Demille, etc. etc. In some respects, Hitchcock borrowed heavily from Ford and admitted it. I wonder what most people would consider to be the distinction between ripping off and simply being influenced.

You're correct that everyone is influenced by others to a certain extent (including Scorsese) . The distinction resides in how much is borrowed and an hommage to another artist. It's also a matter of perception of course. I'm sure others would see PTA's work as very original.
post #52 of 59
Wyatt Gallery.
post #53 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Asch View Post
Lynch, Scorsese, Allen, Coens, Jonze, Tarantino

Knew I forgot someone. Blue Velvet and Mulholland Drive are gold.
post #54 of 59
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by breakz View Post
Knew I forgot someone. Blue Velvet and Mulholland Drive are gold.

I think I like Lynch's failures better than his successes.
post #55 of 59
No love for the Coens?
-Blood Simple
-Rasing Arizona
-NCFOM
-Barton Fink
-Hudsucker
-O Brother
post #56 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tokyo Slim View Post
I've only seen Kids once. Gummo once. Wanted to see Mister Lonely but don't really care enough to remember. I dunno. He just strikes me as sort of a clear second-tier dude. Maybe I'm not giving him a fair shake. The reason I wanted to see ML was because it sounded like maybe it actually had a narrative thread.

Mister Lonely was interesting. I generally liked it, but it seemed a little indulgent and drawn out at times.

Anyway, how about David Lynch? I've been meaning to see Lost Highway for a while...
post #57 of 59
2 not mentioned:

Todd Field makes my list based solely on the merits of In the Bedroom. This man is phenomenally talented and could do some great things if he gets busy.

John Sayles has written/directed some very fine and understated films in his career.
post #58 of 59
I forget about Todd Haynes. I like his stuff, even the failures.
post #59 of 59
If the criterion is "win percentage" - ratio of good movies to bad made relatively recently - I'd go with Julian Schnabel. Basquiat is his first movie and then, in this decade, Before Night Falls and The Diving Bell and the Butterfly. Overall body of work is Scorsese. I haven't responded much to anything he's done since Goodfellas, although the Departed is a good, solid commercial picture.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Entertainment and Culture
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Entertainment and Culture › The best "working" American Filmmakers.