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Cowboy boots - Page 22

post #316 of 440
Continued...see previous post #315...







And one more from before I had a good camera...with a hand cut and hand beveled six part round braid of four (?) passes on the top edge (each strand was roughly 3/32" wide)


--
post #317 of 440
Wow, love the hummingbird motif.

Can you explain the bootmaker jargan to a novice? I assume you are talking about the stitching.






And,


That's an elegant and beautiful Willie Lusk-esque flame stitch-pattern on two of those boot tops. Intentional? or coincidence? If you have seen my posts, I really like Evelyn Green's stitching for Willie Lusk back in the day.
post #318 of 440
Quote:
Originally Posted by Swan Song View Post

Wow, love the hummingbird motif.
Can you explain the bootmaker jargan to a novice? I assume you are talking about the stitching.

Well, I think so--I've been taking on students for over 25 years. And I have written three books on making boots and am the webmaster of The Crispin Colloquy.

What jargon/words do you have in mind?

Quote:
And,
That's an elegant and beautiful Willie Lusk-esque flame stitch-pattern on two of those boot tops. Intentional? or coincidence? If you have seen my posts, I really like Evelyn Green's stitching for Willie Lusk back in the day.

Thank you! I won't say it was intentional because I have intentionally tried never to copy another man's patterns. But there really is nothing new under the sun (the Greek key motif, for instance) and I probably saw something similar on an old boot somewhere along the line and it just sat inside my brain percolating and morphing until one day I sat down and designed the pattern you see. We call it "Prairie Fire."

I am one of the few makers in the US who makes the old style two piece "Full Wellington" boot out of real boot leather...not some soft old garment leather. In fact, one of my books is devoted to the style. So I have seen and handled lots of old boots and I make some styles that have the look and feel of boots that were common in the last quarter of the 19th century. the boots just above the Hummingbirds are pretty historically correct. they are full pegged and have the old coffin toe and the military heel as was common in that time period.

The humminbirds are a three piece style--with a backseam like the old Napoleon/Hussar style boots. This kind of Pee-wee was wildly popular in the nineteen-thirties and forties, however. Lucchese made a whole series of them in honor of the 48 states. They had a representation of state capitals buildings inlaid in them.

PS...for those who don't know...click on the photos and see them considerably larger.

--
post #319 of 440
Are there any resources to help identify the maker of a particular boot? I have a pair that the only markings are a series of 8 numbers in the shaft. I know with shoes a lot of times you can tell by the nail pattern.

post #320 of 440
Like those elephants with maroon tops; very handsome. What color would you call the elephant? Also like the wispy stitch pattern; very elegant.
post #321 of 440
Quote:
Originally Posted by OCULUS View Post

Like those elephants with maroon tops; very handsome. What color would you call the elephant? Also like the wispy stitch pattern; very elegant.

Thank you!

Chocolate.
post #322 of 440
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg613 View Post

Are there any resources to help identify the maker of a particular boot? I have a pair that the only markings are a series of 8 numbers in the shaft. I know with shoes a lot of times you can tell by the nail pattern.

Well Greg, I'm going to take a stab based on a pair in my closet...they look awfully similar (age too), and mine are Dave Little of San Antonio. His logo stamp is VERY faint, in the left hand side of the shaft in both boots, ahead of the pull at about 4 o'clock. See my lousy pic for reference, and check yours. The script capital-L and SanAntonio beneath show best on mine.

OTOH, mine have only 5120 stamped in the front of the shaft. And mine are monogrammed so the stitch pattern is a bit different, but the colors sure look the same.



post #323 of 440
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Well, I think so--I've been taking on students for over 25 years. And I have written three books on making boots and am the webmaster of The Crispin Colloquy.
What jargon/words do you have in mind?
Thank you! I won't say it was intentional because I have intentionally tried never to copy another man's patterns. But there really is nothing new under the sun (the Greek key motif, for instance) and I probably saw something similar on an old boot somewhere along the line and it just sat inside my brain percolating and morphing until one day I sat down and designed the pattern you see. We call it "Prairie Fire."
I am one of the few makers in the US who makes the old style two piece "Full Wellington" boot out of real boot leather...not some soft old garment leather. In fact, one of my books is devoted to the style. So I have seen and handled lots of old boots and I make some styles that have the look and feel of boots that were common in the last quarter of the 19th century. the boots just above the Hummingbirds are pretty historically correct. they are full pegged and have the old coffin toe and the military heel as was common in that time period.
The humminbirds are a three piece style--with a backseam like the old Napoleon/Hussar style boots. This kind of Pee-wee was wildly popular in the nineteen-thirties and forties, however. Lucchese made a whole series of them in honor of the 48 states. They had a representation of state capitals buildings inlaid in them.
PS...for those who don't know...click on the photos and see them considerably larger.
--


Intentional only in the sense that the client said, "hey, I really like the stitch pattern here in this book, can you do something like it ?"..... kind of your take on the style. You captured the essence of the pattern. Very nice.


The jargan I referenced were the words above the boot with the hummingbird. I gathered only enough to know you were talking about how you did the stitching, but not enough to understand what to look for or the difficulty involved.



and,

I clicked on the pictures and it seems about the same, sometimes slightly smaller. Not just your pictures but others around the forum and even on my own pictures. Could be I need to adjust a setting somewhere.
post #324 of 440
Quote:
Originally Posted by Swan Song View Post

Intentional only in the sense that the client said, "hey, I really like the stitch pattern here in this book, can you do something like it ?"..... kind of your take on the style. You captured the essence of the pattern. Very nice.
The jargan I referenced were the words above the boot with the hummingbird. I gathered only enough to know you were talking about how you did the stitching, but not enough to understand what to look for or the difficulty involved.


Well you know what a braid is don't you? Instead of a top bead around the top edge of the boot I cut stands of thin leather and braided it into that edge. Each strand had to be beveled on the flesh/unseen side in order to lay smoothly on the strand it is crossing...so you don't see a raw edge. Braiding is an old and venerable and even Traditional (in the cowboy boot world) technique that you don't see much because it is so time and skill intensive. I've never seen anyone do braidwork on the top edge of a boot that was as fine and refined as the example on the humming bird boots. I have seen braidwork that was just as good...even better...just not on boots.

Here's a photo of a black four part round braid. On the hummingbird boots the strand was half this width and it was a six part braid...meaning at any one point you could count six part around the circumference. "Passes" refers to how many times a particular strand crosses another particular strand, IIRC.


Quote:
I clicked on the pictures and it seems about the same, sometimes slightly smaller. Not just your pictures but others around the forum and even on my own pictures. Could be I need to adjust a setting somewhere.

It has to do with how big the photo is when it is uploaded. As I mentioned I took the photo of the Hummingbird boot before I had a good digital camera. The final photo was too small pixel-wise to display much larger than what you see. Later photos are actually large enough that they would fill the entire scree on your computer if the forum software allowed.
post #325 of 440
Here are a some of the boots that I designed and then had made by various custom boot companies. As you see, I favor smooth leathers. My boots are mostly made from Italian Kangaroo, Sheridan Kangaroo, or a combination of the two.

I require a fairly flat arch for my very flat feet. These boots have all been either made that way, or relasted to fit that way.

For some reason when you click on each picture, the boots themselves in the photos get really grainy. The photos of the boots when not enlarged are what they actually look like.

Paul Bond



El Vaquero



James Leddy



M.L. Leddy


Edited by jmonroestyle - 8/23/12 at 7:16pm
post #326 of 440
Thank you Ray. Those are pretty close, but mine are not stamped with an L or if they had been in the past it isn't visible now.

I want to get them recrafted, and I would like to go through the original maker for that if possible, so I will reach out to them and see if I can confirm. If all else fails, I think I am going to give B. Nelson a try as there aren't a lot of options for western boots.
post #327 of 440
Here are a few more...

El Vaquero


Paul Bond


J.B. Hill

Edited by jmonroestyle - 8/23/12 at 8:15pm
post #328 of 440
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Well you know what a braid is don't you? Instead of a top bead around the top edge of the boot I cut stands of thin leather and braided it into that edge. Each strand had to be beveled on the flesh/unseen side in order to lay smoothly on the strand it is crossing...so you don't see a raw edge. Braiding is an old and venerable and even Traditional (in the cowboy boot world) technique that you don't see much because it is so time and skill intensive. I've never seen anyone do braidwork on the top edge of a boot that was as fine and refined as the example on the humming bird boots. I have seen braidwork that was just as good...even better...just not on boots.
Here's a photo of a black four part round braid. On the hummingbird boots the strand was half this width and it was a six part braid...meaning at any one point you could count six part around the circumference. "Passes" refers to how many times a particular strand crosses another particular strand, IIRC.

It has to do with how big the photo is when it is uploaded. As I mentioned I took the photo of the Hummingbird boot before I had a good digital camera. The final photo was too small pixel-wise to display much larger than what you see. Later photos are actually large enough that they would fill the entire scree on your computer if the forum software allowed.


OK, I see what you mean, with the close-up. The first picture did not resolve to the point I could see the braiding, it just looked like a black area.

Thanks for the pictures and the explanation.
post #329 of 440
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmonroestyle View Post

Here are a few more...
El Vaquero

Paul Bond

J. B. Hill

Nice collection, especially considering they were designed by you. Your conservative style would pass along with mine here in the northeast; but. I'm about to break that mold in the next couple of weeks; stay tuned!
post #330 of 440
Thanks Ray!

I am originally from the Northeast. I always liked the look of a "businessman's" dress boot, and often wear them both with jeans, as well as trousers and a vest, or sport coat.
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