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Cowboy boots - Page 20

post #286 of 413
Quote:
Originally Posted by OCULUS View Post

Wow! I just clicked on that enlarged picture of bug/toe flower on your TL boots--really spectacular. Almost like a ram's horn. Were they a custom design or something they marketed at that time?



These were a recent find, the first of this era Tony Lama I have bought. There is a copyright date of 1984 and "Tony Lama Company, Inc." stitched up the side seam.

Very nice, comfortable boot.



post #287 of 413
Very vintage shark in deep chocolate brown.

I used a flash to highlight the texture of the sharkskin and the two tone shading.

One piece vamp, high quality now and back in the day.

Tough to breakin but can't ever wear them out.




post #288 of 413
Those sharkskin boots are amazing. The texture of the leather is unbelievable.
post #289 of 413
And I'm about to apply the third sole.

Amazing durability.

And if you notice the nice rippling effect runs across the foot, almost all sharkskin I see has it running towards the toe with an effect not nearing as nice as this example. It gives the leather an extra 3D effect in addition to the natural texture.


post #290 of 413
Quote:
Originally Posted by Swan Song View Post

And I'm about to apply the third sole.
Amazing durability.
And if you notice the nice rippling effect runs across the foot, almost all sharkskin I see has it running towards the toe with an effect not nearing as nice as this example. It gives the leather an extra 3D effect in addition to the natural texture.

Very interesting Swan. Does that gray in the creases disappear with some Bick or is it the natural coloration coming through?
post #291 of 413
I wonder if it's a result of RTW through the last century replacing bespoke bootmakers in the West, but the modern proportions of cowboy boots just don't look right to me. The front of the sole is way too thin relative to the massive heel, causing a very steep angle of the foot, which simultaneously makes one's feet look small and the top of the foot (forefoot) humungous. Add the feminine point to the toe box and the result looks comical, not to mention horribly uncomfortable? I'm having my bespoke shoemaker me an 'improved' cowboy boot with a thicker frontal sole to balance out the heel, and an extended yet rounded toebox to reduce the visual impact of a steep foot. He's also doing an ergonomic insert to give the boot more roll and cushion. Will post when done.
post #292 of 413
Svenn,

Can't wait to see pictures with what you two come up with. Please post pictures.

What you are describing with the funky proportions are Fashion Boots, not traditional cowboy boots. The people who design and market them might call them cowboy boots, but to those in the know(hence the reason a few of us keep this thread alive) see the monstrosities for what they are, hybrids that only hint at their ancestor origins.





Oculus,


the gray is at the depth of the wavy valley.....Up-close you really do not see that, it is mostly an artifact, with a flash. Sharkskin is microscopically "grainy" and there is no crease or cracks like calf....think cordovan leather for an analogy. I had just cleaned and conditioned them prior to the pictures, and the flash was to show the 3D effect of well seasoned sharkskin.



Custom order Lucchese Handmade Classic Alligator tail in black almost 20 years old. 6 row stitch (white thread and black) pattern on top.



post #293 of 413

It's really a function of location more than fashion. I'll wear mine in Texas, but not when I travel elsewhere. I love them. They're kind of one of those "if you know what it is, you're okay with it" type things. Most people think they're cheap boots. Most Texans know they're more expensive than almost all dress shoes, which gives them credibility (let's face facts, expensive things get the benefit of the doubt). I'm a native New Yorker that moved to Texas in my mid 20's. They were weird to me initially. I bought a pair to go to this big Texas themed ball and fell in love with them. They're pretty cool and unique to Texas (mostly), which I like.

 

They're comfortable, durable and different. Also, they can be helpful for the people I talk to in my line of work. Mine can also make it through a metal detector whereas my dress shoes (all Cole Haan) can't make it through.

 

Downsides: They're miserable to dance in. I have driving a manual with them, and my car is a manual. They fit really well (snug everywhere). If you sit for a long time, my feet swell a tiny bit (normal) and they get really tight. Keep this in mind if you have a long commute.

 

I also refuse to wear black dress socks after getting out of Catholic school, so it helps cover up my drawer filled with bright Happy Socks in situations where I need to be more formal.

 

With a suit:

They're certainly a bit less formal than traditional shoes, but still acceptable (in Texas), I certainly wouldn't wear them to a wedding or job interview, but I do wear them to the office (suit every day office).

 

With jeans:

They're a more dressy/formal than casual loafers, but still casual. I wear them to dinners, dates, nicer bars, etc. Basically, they're perfect if I'm wearing a dress shirt and jeans.

 

I'd recommend ostrich as a first pair. Gator is a bit too back woods redneck for your only pair. Plain leather is kind of boring and not as cool/formal. Lizard is just weird, and not as verasitile as ostrich. Snake- only acceptable if you carry a 12" knife around the desert man daily and killed the snake yourself.

 

Also note: Cheap boots look like... well, cheap boots. If you're spending at least $350-400 on them, don't get them. If they have rubber soles, don't get them. If they have a square toe, don't get them. The only acceptable colors, especially with a suit, are brown (darker) and black. My friend has grey from an elephant, which is kind of cool too. 

 

 

 

edit: I should mention the above only applies if you live in/around some sort of major city. If you're actually a cowboy or live on 25 acres or something, the rules change.

post #294 of 413
it's good to have different perspectives and comments, they're just footwear, and I mostly disagree, but agreeably.smile.gif

Post some pictures of your boots









An unknown bootmaker from the late 1950's.
post #295 of 413

I've got a pair of [url=http://www.overstock.com/Clothing-Shoes/Ariat-Heritage-Roughstock-Brown-Oiled-Rowdy-Boots/4071521/product.html] THESE ARIATS[/url] in my closest that I haven't worn in two years. Got a pair of Rocky boots that I didn't like so much. 

 

I currently wear Tony Lamas nearly daily (it's either my AE Strands or these boots as my main footwear). I know nothing about them. Bought them at western wear store in LBK after a few beers (haha).  Stamped inside is "6197" then size" then "1107" and "MADE IN USA" below.

 

 

 

 

They could use some care, I spose. 

 

As I'm in law school, and no longer really working outside (as much), they dont get beat down like my older boots did.

post #296 of 413
Quote:
Originally Posted by CrAz3D View Post

I've got a pair of [url=http://www.overstock.com/Clothing-Shoes/Ariat-Heritage-Roughstock-Brown-Oiled-Rowdy-Boots/4071521/product.html] THESE ARIATS[/url] in my closest that I haven't worn in two years. Got a pair of Rocky boots that I didn't like so much. 

I currently wear Tony Lamas nearly daily (it's either my AE Strands or these boots as my main footwear). I know nothing about them. Bought them at western wear store in LBK after a few beers (haha).  Stamped inside is "6197" then size" then "1107" and "MADE IN USA" below.





They could use some care, I spose. 

As I'm in law school, and no longer really working outside (as much), they dont get beat down like my older boots did.

Like the perfed swath across the vamp; they look like ElPaso saddle oxfords!
post #297 of 413

I'm guessing that's re: the piece over the lower and over the upper. (not too well versed in shoe stuffs). But yeah....all my boots have had that because I like that.

 

Also, the back end of the heel sticks out just enough to hold up spurs. My Rockys didnt hold spurs well. My Ariats had a riding heel, so those wore spurs quite well. That said, it's been a few years since I've been out riding. I like to ride for enjoyment. I've never been on a ride for work (horses arent exactly lawyer tools...haha)

 

I'm from very near El Paso. I want to make it to the factory some time.

post #298 of 413
They are designed that way to add reinforcement where the spurs rest at the tongue area, hence the spur ledge on the back of the heel. A working cowboy cowboy boot.



Thanks for posting pictures
post #299 of 413
Quote:
Originally Posted by CrAz3D View Post

I'm guessing that's re: the piece over the lower and over the upper. (not too well versed in shoe stuffs). But yeah....all my boots have had that because I like that.

Also, the back end of the heel sticks out just enough to hold up spurs. My Rockys didnt hold spurs well. My Ariats had a riding heel, so those wore spurs quite well. That said, it's been a few years since I've been out riding. I like to ride for enjoyment. I've never been on a ride for work (horses arent exactly lawyer tools...haha)

I'm from very near El Paso. I want to make it to the factory some time.

If you are ever up in Cimarron, NM, the town where the Boy Scout National Jamboree Camp is, be sure to have lunch, or at least stop in the Cimarron Hotel dining room there; they have a gorgeous collection of historical spurs mounted in large glass-fronted cases on the wall. I have some shots of them, but the reflection off the glass is pretty bad. And speaking of shots, be sure to note the bullet holes in the stamped-tin ceiling too....lol.

Here is a shot of genuine working cowboy boots (cutting horse training EX UU Ranch, located there) and its manager with his daughter.

post #300 of 413
Quote:
Originally Posted by Svenn View Post

I wonder if it's a result of RTW through the last century replacing bespoke bootmakers in the West, but the modern proportions of cowboy boots just don't look right to me. The front of the sole is way too thin relative to the massive heel, causing a very steep angle of the foot, which simultaneously makes one's feet look small and the top of the foot (forefoot) humungous. Add the feminine point to the toe box and the result looks comical, not to mention horribly uncomfortable? I'm having my bespoke shoemaker me an 'improved' cowboy boot with a thicker frontal sole to balance out the heel, and an extended yet rounded toebox to reduce the visual impact of a steep foot. He's also doing an ergonomic insert to give the boot more roll and cushion. Will post when done.

I wanted to ask about, and perhaps address your source for "authentic" thick-soled remarks by showing you a pair of new, "bespoke" Luccheses that I ordered this spring. They feature the more comfortable in the stirrups "double sole" and slightly lower tops and spur ledge that were described to me (by a very authentic western store owner) as authentic cowboy riding boots. I don't know the source of his design characteristics, but I wanted to tell you that I have tried these and don't really care for them. (Indeed, they came through with a double row of WHITE WELT stitching which I had told them to delete in the specs; so I got out my leather sole dye and daubed them back into brown submission.)

To make a long story short, I bought the original boots (designed by the Telluride, CO store owner) from stock and the surface of the glossy kangaroo erupted and blistered off its lacquer-like finish. So they offered to have a new pair made up for me and asked what if any changes I'd like. I told them to make the left to my 12.5 measurements, and right to 12, loose the glossy finish and to delete the white-welt stitching. Well, they got 2/3 of it right.

I must note that the stained tooling, though attractive, is extremely sharp and a perfect match on both boots, leading me to believe that it is machine die-cut (a higher form of embossing) rather than hand-tooled. And the pricing, though not cheap, is nowhere near what I am paying for a pair of fully hand-tooled Falconhead/Tres Outlaws that ought to be here by Labor Day.

Any double-soled or tooled fans out there with experience observations?




Edited by OCULUS - 8/19/12 at 5:33pm
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