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Cowboy boots - Page 16

post #226 of 407
It's probably the correct length since my feet are just about the length of the boot--I can imagine sizing down would make my toes poke at the tip of the shoe.

However my feet are slim, proportions wise, between that of a man and a woman's foot. If I weren't so hairy my feet could probably pass off as a woman's. Also, with really thick socks (think hiking socks, with all the cushion), then it fits just nice but those socks are a tad too thick to be worn regularly. So I think going a width down would help.
post #227 of 407
Try a insole and report back.


I use leather Tacco Brand, but Dr Scholls are very good, also.

If I need a smidgen of snuggness this is what I do.
post #228 of 407
According to every video on Lucchese (and western boots in general really) fitting, the guy in the video says that when you put your leg into the boot, there's supposed to be some manner of resistance, and when you finally step down, there should be a "pop" sound. (past the heel lock).

Aforementioned video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7FuJsOsDt30 (around the 0:25 mark)

In the video, the "pop" is quite resounding. If there IS a pop sound, but the resistance seems too... "little," and the sound is more of click rather than a pop, is that an issue with length or width? Reason I'm asking is, as I mentioned earlier, I don't think my foot would fit in a half-size smaller boot (length wise).
post #229 of 407
There are two schools of thought on the matter...the first is that a boot should actually go on hard. This approach tends to predominate in the northern tier states--Colorado, Wyoming, Kansas, Montana, Idaho, California, Oregon, Washington, etc., as well as Alberta and Saskatchewan.

Many of my clients, who have not worn boots think they cannot get the boots I've made for them on, when in fact, they are more worried about getting them off than actually getting into them. And that in itself is a false assumption because a boot is always going to be easier to get off than on even though a boot jack may be required for ultimate ease and comfort--it's a matter of angles.

In my shop the customer must stand up grasp the pulls and drive the heel straight down into the boot--it is an act of faith for some. If the boot can be pulled on while sitting it doesn't fit right in the throat.

And that's not the same as not fitting at all.

The second approach is to make the throat wide enough for the boot to go on easily (and come off easily--the last thing that real working cowboys want). this approach is widely adopted by manufacturers with little or no incentive to do any bespoke work and who must insure that any given size will accommodate as wide a range of foot shapes as possible. High insteps, low insteps, etc..

Typically those makers working along the Texas/Mexican border even if they are bespoke makers draw a lot of their techniques and influences from factory and RTW work, simply because that's where all the major factories are--where wages are depressed.

So boots made along the border also tend to have wide throats.

Neither the throat nor the ease of entry determines whether the foot of the boot will actually fit.
post #230 of 407
So I'm assuming Lucchese Classics fall into the second category? There's nothing I can do to make the throat slimmer, is there?

That said, If I'm satisfied with how a particular size fits me, in every aspect EXCEPT for the instep... I should go down a width right?

I'm currently wearing a 7.5D. Everything fits great. The ball is at the correct place, the length is correct (feels correct to me anyway) and whatnot, but the instep is visibly too loose; I can push down about half a cm of leather on the sides, and about 1cm straight from the top. Basically the amount of space there could probably accommodate me wearing 3 pairs of socks on top of each other or a VERY thick pair of winter socks. Swan Song suggested using insoles, but I figure if the store has a generous return policy (and said boots haven't been worn), then I might as well use that to my advantage.

The thing I'm worried about going down a width though, is that the the if the instep gets tighter, the ball would too, wouldn't it?
post #231 of 407
No, but if the insteps were tighter the throat would probably be a bit tighter as well.

Going down a size will indeed tighten the joint measure.
post #232 of 407
Take his advice, mine is from trial and error over time. And we are close to saying the same thing.

Oh, and definitely get a boot jack, my right hip would feel better if I started using one years ago.

Hooks too to pull them on as you step down into them.

And some baby powder for the first few times.
post #233 of 407
Quote:
Originally Posted by Swan Song View Post

Or you're one length size to long
Snugness across the instep and snugness of the shaft at the lower leg(tongue area of the boot) keeps the heel from slipping too much till they are broken in. After breaking in, it's the snugness across the top of the foot that holds the foot in place. Gotta get that right. It should still slip a "bit" after break-in.
The higher quality the boot the better. Vintage Tony Lama, Nocona and one or two Justin's are the factory boots in my closet. Dan Post is a step down, and the cliff is steep after them. They may look like a cowboy boot, but that's about all.
Vintage Lucchese Boots are heads and shoulders above the other factory boots I mentioned(PRE 1990). They made one line of stock boot, additionally, one could get a custom. All Lucchese boots of that era were designed to have a slight twist as the foot slid into the vamp. It was patented. Also, a main reason the boot fit so well.

PM if you have questions.

So, I have a pair of boots where the "snugness across the top" is lacking. The result is that my foot slides down to the end of the boot, smashing my toes against the front of the boot. Anything I can do to remedy this?

(Please say yes. These are Tony Lama alligators.)
post #234 of 407
Uh.....I would try a few things before selling them.uhoh.gif



Dollar Store's around here(kind of a very small footprint, low-end walmart ) sell double thickness cushion insoles and add different thickness socks to get a fit.

Allen Edmonds sells leather orthotic insoles that fit their "sportier' leather shoes, (these are thick like New Balance insoles) and try different thickness socks to see how they fit. Heck, try the New Balance ones if that's all you have on hand.

Engage with your bootmaker friend, sometimes they can relast and pull them in a width when they resole them.

I bet DWFII can speak to that.

I have tried cutting out the heel part for the first two suggestions with some but mostly unfriendly results.



Either way you go, do not think you can walk a mile, bend and lift and carry stuff....you know, be really active...these suggestions only go for wearing them to a party or to work where you can show them and not be worried about a ton of comfort.

This advice is only if you really, really like them because they are special. if not, sell and buy some that fit.




DWFII, I would like your opinion and comments on these if you missed my posting:

http://www.styleforum.net/t/145038/alligator-crocodile-shoes/195#post_5507556
post #235 of 407
Do they look like these Tony Lama's? Belly cut on the bias, with fancy stitched top. These were TL's top stock boot in alligator in the 1970's.



467
post #236 of 407
Here are mine:

388331
post #237 of 407
Great color combo, I like them. Hope you can get them to work for you.





How about a custom Summer Boot just in time for the hot summer weather.


697


263



263


443



Willie Lusk Bootmaker with his famous Flame Stitch by Evelyn Green




Display only......about a men's 7-8 or women's 9-10.
Edited by Swan Song - 6/13/12 at 9:36am
post #238 of 407
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
There are two schools of thought on the matter...the first is that a boot should actually go on hard. This approach tends to predominate in the northern tier states--Colorado, Wyoming, Kansas, Montana, Idaho, California, Oregon, Washington, etc., as well as Alberta and Saskatchewan.
Many of my clients, who have not worn boots think they cannot get the boots I've made for them on, when in fact, they are more worried about getting them off than actually getting into them. And that in itself is a false assumption because a boot is always going to be easier to get off than on even though a boot jack may be required for ultimate ease and comfort--it's a matter of angles.
In my shop the customer must stand up grasp the pulls and drive the heel straight down into the boot--it is an act of faith for some. If the boot can be pulled on while sitting it doesn't fit right in the throat.
And that's not the same as not fitting at all.
The second approach is to make the throat wide enough for the boot to go on easily (and come off easily--the last thing that real working cowboys want). this approach is widely adopted by manufacturers with little or no incentive to do any bespoke work and who must insure that any given size will accommodate as wide a range of foot shapes as possible. High insteps, low insteps, etc..
Typically those makers working along the Texas/Mexican border even if they are bespoke makers draw a lot of their techniques and influences from factory and RTW work, simply because that's where all the major factories are--where wages are depressed.
So boots made along the border also tend to have wide throats.
Neither the throat nor the ease of entry determines whether the foot of the boot will actually fit.

DW,

I have a pair of ankle height side-zip boots. The instep is nice and tight and I have to stand up to pull them on, even when they're unzipped. However, further up across the ankle they are much looser. I think this is what has caused them to slep a little bit, especially when I'm walking uphill.

Is there anything I can do to fix this? I was tempted to try gluing on a suede lining around the ankle area.
post #239 of 407
I just picked these up yesterday at the J.B. Hill factory in El Paso. To say I'm excited would be a major understatement.

http://www.jbhilltexas.com/classics/style_2k5.html

bounce2.gif
post #240 of 407
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hannerhan View Post

I just picked these up yesterday at the J.B. Hill factory in El Paso. To say I'm excited would be a major understatement.
http://www.jbhilltexas.com/classics/style_2k5.html
bounce2.gif

wow, those are awesome.
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