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On the Street in NYC....Old Man Mory - Page 5

post #61 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing
Yes, but there is a distinct context of blacks dressing very well, which I was trying to articulate.

By "not directed at Labelking" i intended to convey that my statement was not a reply to or comment on or questioning of the material in your post.
post #62 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by howbah
By "not directed at Labelking" i intended to convey that my statement was not a reply to or comment on or questioning of the material in your post.
I felt compelled.
post #63 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing
That outfit would have been outrageous even in the '70s.

I think I made a rather clear point of the socio-economic ramifications that would contextualize the relative "flamboyance" of the attire.

It is a question of wealth and status. I once read that Steve Harvey's multi-buttoned suits were a sort of epitome for some people to reach, which became unpopular due to the rap culture glamourizing platinum chains and Burberry and now the trend is for the Puff Daddy look of a pseudo-aristocratic genre.

Really, I dislike the aura of mawkish political correctness surrounding anything approaching race.

OK: the guy in the first picture is wearing what can objectively be described as "a ridiculous getup." On the other hand, the picture was taken during an era of outrageous male attire - worn by all races - and at a public event - a heavyweight championship match - where showbizzy, "red carpet" attire would not be out of place. Consequently that particular picture is of no value as a paradigm of Black sartorial taste.

In total contrast, the people in the second picture are, as I pointed out, simply well-dressed People. They look good in those outfits not "because" they're Black, not "in spite of" being Black, but because their clothes are, objectively, elegant.

My original objection - which wasn't actually meant to be PC - was to the idea that a stupid costume, that would be risible if worn by a White American, somehow is deemed appropriate for wear by a Black American.

I don't think it's unjustified to suggest that that is at best a patronizing attitude.
post #64 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing
I felt compelled.


Fight it, LK. After all, I've managed to resist the urge to pepper my posts with irrelevant smilies ...
post #65 of 75
this might not be very PC - but I do feel that some things look better, to me on people of different cultures (which, unfortunatly, often is reflected by race). for instance jewlery - I think that a south asian man wearing gemstone rings is perfectly acceptable, where I would not like that in a westerner. same thing some bracelets with Italian and Latin Aermican men - I find it a good look, where I would not in a North American. I see nothing in Morie's dress that I would say is more fitting to a black man than a white - except in that he has a physically dramiatic look that is not that common, with his exagerated waist and his shaved head. he has a very individualistic look.
post #66 of 75
Bravo Mory, your courage of color and pattern exploration is not overlooked.

Why can't an individual simply be poorly dressed or well dressed?

Why is color obsession central to a general MB discussion? Tsk, Tsk, Tsk.
post #67 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing
Really, I dislike the aura of mawkish political correctness surrounding anything approaching race.

Ditto.

koji
post #68 of 75
To use a somewhat more pronounced example, no one would bat an eye at a Yucatecan Mayan wearing a huipil. However, if a tourist visting Chichen Itza wore the same, it would seem odd and forced. Conversely, if the Mayan was wearing a Hawiian shirt, white New Balances and cargo shorts, it would look strange.

Context is central to clothing, and ethnic/racial identity is part of context.
post #69 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by howbah
The idea that an outfit that is per se excessive or even ridiculous is somehow appropriate wear for a Black person makes me uncomfortable.

That isn't the point. The urban, Northern black men of the 20th Century frequently dressed more colorfully, not ridiculously. See my many summaries on "Cadillac style."

Sensitivity is a wonderful thing; however, sometimes it gets in the way of recognizing very real cultural differences, even ones that maybe should be celebrated.
post #70 of 75
I admit it... I've been known to dress like a pimp.
Then again, being confused with a pimp might be a social boon for me.
post #71 of 75
"Black Man Style" (I know it sounds horribly crass) actually has nothing to do with what Mory is wearing. But a clothing style that is marketed towards and worn primarily by blacks should warrant its own style context. Would "Urban sartorial style" be any less patronizing? Is it less patronizing than implying that Mory can wear his Technicolor outfit and it looks good on him because he is black without overtly saying so?

To me it's a question of tonality and contrast; take a color like pale yellow, on a Caucasian person I find this color hard to dress because it becomes almost too blended. On a darker person this color (amongst many others) is exquisite, just my opinion.

To put it simply because I know the board has been quite sensitive of late, I did not intend to come off as racially insensitive or offend anyone.

Rome
post #72 of 75
post #73 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by korinkahn

That's a much nicer outfit, though it's still cut too trim for my taste. That trimness accentuates the roundness of his face.
post #74 of 75
What if he were wearing this?
post #75 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing
Really, I dislike the aura of mawkish political correctness surrounding anything approaching race.
I totally agree. We have to accept that different races of people have innate or learned differences (for the most part). Some may say it's racist/stereotypical to identify a certain look with blacks or whites, but those stereotypes came from somewhere. Every time I'm in a part of town with a large black population, or go to a concert or club with a large black attendance, or see a clothing store that caters to blacks, the differences are obvious. Whether it's in the way of dress, dance, music, or mannerisms, you'd have to be a fool to disagree that in general blacks have a lot more flambouyance/pizazz/Soul/style/flavor/whatever than whites. And of course, by flambouyant I in no way mean 'ridiculous' or any other negative connotation.
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