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On the Street in NYC....Old Man Mory - Page 4

post #46 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnapril
That would have been a blast!


I never get invited to the cool parties
post #47 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by GreyFlannelMan
I believe Mory works at Eredi Pisano on Madison Ave.


thanks - I got the feeling people knew him and I was wondering who he was.
post #48 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnapril
Etro meets picnic tablecloth. Why not?

haha that is a perfect description!

LabelKing, great photos of vintage Harlem!
post #49 of 75
Certainly an attractive look. That is, he would attract my attention. The jacket is a bit too small though. I personally like the suppression on the waist. But the shoulders are even a pulling a bit around his delts. It looks as if they would do the same, even if his arms were down at his sides.

As to the colorful combo. I have to agree that the guy has style and panache. It just looks TO ME as if he's trying too hard. With the boldness of these color combos, either one - shirt or tie - would be sufficient to make a statement.

So while I do like it, in general, it looks to me a bit like a bag of Skittles got thrown together in the blender.
post #50 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing

Here's a quote from the 1981 text, The Language of Clothes:

as equality of opportunity increases the relative elegance of Blacks may decline.'

Note this outfit worn by a spectator at the 1970 Muhammad Ali-Oscar Bonavena boxing match:


Harlem couple:


Couple wearing raccoon skin coats in their Cadillac in Harlem by James Van Der Zee:



Well, the first photo was taken in the 1970s, soooo ....

The other two show stylishly rather than flamboyantly dressed people.

The idea that an outfit that is per se excessive or even ridiculous is somehow appropriate wear for a Black person makes me uncomfortable.
post #51 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by howbah
The idea that an outfit that is per se excessive or even ridiculous is somehow appropriate wear for a Black person makes me uncomfortable.
Because it implies the assumption that black men are outrageous, even clownish figures, thus suited to wear such clothing?
post #52 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by howbah
The idea that an outfit that is per se excessive or even ridiculous is somehow appropriate wear for a Black person makes me uncomfortable.
That wasn't his point. It was that everyone's conception of excessive is not the same. How I read it, anyway.
post #53 of 75
Just because it's overdone doesn't make it risky, avant garde or stylish.

I also don't think there's much of a historical impertaive at work here. Rather, this guy is a walking billboard for his shop. Basically he's shilling the comapny's togs. He's not a designer, he's a sales guy.

If he didn't work at the shop that sold these clothes would he be wearing them. Doubtful, highly doubtful.

Thumbs down!
post #54 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by tiger02
That wasn't his point. It was that everyone's conception of excessive is not the same. How I read it, anyway.


That line wasn't actually directed at Labelking. I've seen the idea - "that outfit looks good on him, because he's Black" -expressed often enough, in enough places, to be somewhat troubling. The Harlem Couple in LK's post doesn't look good because they're Black, they look good because they're dressed elegantly.

I think whoopee has identified the implicit subtext accurately.
post #55 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by howbah
That line wasn't actually directed at Labelking. I've seen the idea - "that outfit looks good on him, because he's Black" -expressed often enough, in enough places, to be somewhat troubling. The Harlem Couple in LK's post doesn't look good because they're Black, they look good because they're dressed elegantly.

I think whoopee has identified the implicit subtext accurately.

I agree with you.

That being said, there are certain colors that I like but can only wear after a vacation when I have seen some sun. Black guys can generally wear those colors more often.

TO me, that is the only difference.
post #56 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by howbah
That line wasn't actually directed at Labelking. I've seen the idea - "that outfit looks good on him, because he's Black" -expressed often enough, in enough places, to be somewhat troubling. The Harlem Couple in LK's post doesn't look good because they're Black, they look good because they're dressed elegantly.

I think whoopee has identified the implicit subtext accurately.
OK. Agreed. Remembering the dude in the full up crimson zoot suit from a week or two ago, that is the sort of outfit I think you're referring to, that would get those comments? I think it looked like crap, no matter his skin tone.

LK did identify why African-Americans (consciously chosen term over black) have a dandy history and the concomitant cultural pressures, which I thought was interesting and appropriate.

Tom
post #57 of 75
Way too dandyish for my tastes.
post #58 of 75
I like the color here. freakish or not. However, the skittles comment made me laugh. In my opinion, it seems to me that our business suit culture could let a little more color in. always the black white grey routine. It begins to look like a sea of librarians. Is that our choiceronald McDonald or librarian?
post #59 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by howbah
That line wasn't actually directed at Labelking. I've seen the idea - "that outfit looks good on him, because he's Black" -expressed often enough, in enough places, to be somewhat troubling. The Harlem Couple in LK's post doesn't look good because they're Black, they look good because they're dressed elegantly.

I think whoopee has identified the implicit subtext accurately.
Yes, but there is a distinct context of blacks dressing very well, which I was trying to articulate.
post #60 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by howbah
Well, the first photo was taken in the 1970s, soooo .... The other two show stylishly rather than flamboyantly dressed people. The idea that an outfit that is per se excessive or even ridiculous is somehow appropriate wear for a Black person makes me uncomfortable.
That outfit would have been outrageous even in the '70s. I think I made a rather clear point of the socio-economic ramifications that would contextualize the relative "flamboyance" of the attire. It is a question of wealth and status. I once read that Steve Harvey's multi-buttoned suits were a sort of epitome for some people to reach, which became unpopular due to the rap culture glamourizing platinum chains and Burberry and now the trend is for the Puff Daddy look of a pseudo-aristocratic genre. Really, I dislike the aura of mawkish political correctness surrounding anything approaching race.
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