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Grammar/Spelling/Syntax/English lessons - Page 11

post #151 of 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by trogdor
Oooh, I've just thought of another one and this drives me absolutely fucking crazy; people who don't know the difference between "bereft" and "devoid."


If I understand correctly, each of the two clauses separated by a semi-colon must be able stand alone as a complete sentence; your use of the semi-colon does not conform to this standard.
post #152 of 202
Fabienne,

Thanks for the detailed discussion about "unbeknownst." This is one of the rare times I've been both right and wrong about something at the same time.
post #153 of 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by Margaret
If I understand correctly, each of the two clauses separated by a semi-colon must be able stand alone as a complete sentence; your use of the semi-colon is not consistent with this requirement.

yup, the semicolon should be a colon -- or maybe a dash, for that extra 'dash' of drama.
post #154 of 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by Margaret
If I understand correctly, each of the two clauses separated by a semi-colon must be able stand alone as a complete sentence; your use of the semi-colon is not consistent with this requirement.

ZING! You got me. Oh, it burns. That should have been a colon.
post #155 of 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kent Wang
Webster says the alternate definition is acceptable:

Argh! My mind.

Far be it from me to dispute Websters, but if this use is permissible, then it would be OK to say "A bachelor is an adult male who is bereft of a wife."
post #156 of 202
As/like used interchangeably.

Like I said, ...

Another one of those that now must be accepted, but I still cannot get used to it.
post #157 of 202
Thread Starter 
The passive voice isn't liked.
post #158 of 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by j
The passive voice isn't liked.

one of my favorite sayings: "Mistakes Were Made."
post #159 of 202
Plurals are formed by adding an s. Not an apostrophe s. The fellow who posted asking for people to post pictures of "there berluti's with jeans" since he was considering investing [sic] brings home the travesty.
post #160 of 202
The doctors' meeting.

Mr.Strauss's house.

There is a difference.
post #161 of 202
Also it is tailor not taylor.
post #162 of 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing
Also it is tailor not taylor.


My tailor is rich.

First sentence of L'anglais sans peine, a manual for teaching English, back in the 30's.
post #163 of 202
Half the workers

or

Half of the workers

Which is correct? And why?
post #164 of 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alter
Half the workers

or

Half of the workers

Which is correct? And why?


Half of.

Though in Detroit, they say halve the workers.
post #165 of 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alter
Half the workers

or

Half of the workers

Which is correct? And why?

I always assumed both were correct, although if I had to pick, I would go with "half of". I feel there is a slight distinction between the two I'm not quite adept at explaining. Is it only a matter of style?
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