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post #121 of 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by j
I agree on all but the first. "He said he will come" (hasn't happened yet) and "He said he would come" (but didn't or did, has happened already) are different sentences with different meanings, unless the person thinks they mean the same thing. Or am I missing the point?

Present: He says he will come.
Simple past/preterit: He said he would come.

But again, in American English, it seems fine not to respect tense agreement.
post #122 of 202
Another way of explaining what I meant:

He said: "I will come." ---> Reporting: He said he would come.

Am I going to get killed about that period inside the quote?
post #123 of 202
Waiting on instead of waiting for.

Although this may be an acceptable second meaning now?
post #124 of 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fabienne
Another way of explaining what I meant:

He said: "I will come." ---> Reporting: He said he would come.

Am I going to get killed about that period inside the quote?
Not killed, Fab. But definitely punished!
post #125 of 202
Also, I wish NPR could train its journalists to understand the difference between an interpreter and a translator.
post #126 of 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dakota rube
Not killed, Fab. But definitely punished!

In my defense, you all confused me, so I decided to apply French punctuation to English and be done with it.
post #127 of 202
By far, my biggest peeve in this department is usage of "its" versus "it's":

"It's" is only used when "it is" or "it has" would fit. Otherwise, use "its." Period, the end.

Some people incorrectly think "it's" (with apostrophe) is possessive, as in: "Nice blazer; it's buttons must be mother of pearl." But, this is wrong, wrong, wrong. Neither "it is" nor "it has" fits, so "its" must be used.
post #128 of 202
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fabienne
Present: He says he will come.
Simple past/preterit: He said he would come.

But again, in American English, it seems fine not to respect tense agreement.

If he said it in the past, then "he said he will come" is correct IMO. At least it makes more sense and is more specific than "he says" which is nebulous as to when it was said. Once something is said, it doesn't continue being said, even if "he says" is a common (and possibly correct) way of putting it. In fact, I think "he says he will come" is more awkward.
post #129 of 202
Thread Starter 
Semi-OT: I hate the words "moist" and "wipe". Eww.
post #130 of 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by j
If he said it in the past, then "he said he will come" is correct IMO. At least it makes more sense and is more specific than "he says" which is nebulous as to when it was said. Once something is said, it doesn't continue being said, even if "he says" is a common (and possibly correct) way of putting it. In fact, I think "he says he will come" is more awkward.

I don't know how else to explain it, but let's try thinking of it in terms of a journalist on the radio, perhaps? When reporting, you remove your tense once in the past: The prime minister said he would start talks with the Labor Party. The original quote was, in the PM's mouth: "I will start talks with the Labor Party."

I think it's so pervasive and accepted in American English, it probably doesn't make sense to you, but I think in the British Isles, it's more commonly respected. My main point is, with complex sentences, it can cause confusion.
post #131 of 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by j
Semi-OT: I hate the words "moist" and "wipe". Eww.

Wait till you have a baby. That'll cure you.
post #132 of 202
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fabienne
Wait till you have a baby. That'll cure you.
Not a big fan of those either.
post #133 of 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by kabert
By far, my biggest peeve in this department is usage of "its" versus "it's":

"It's" is only used when "it is" or "it has" would fit. Otherwise, use "its." Period, the end.

Some people incorrectly think "it's" (with apostrophe) is possessive, as in: "Nice blazer; it's buttons must be mother of pearl." But, this is wrong, wrong, wrong. Neither "it is" nor "it has" fits, so "its" must be used.

You might as well add their and they're in the bag.

When I was about 10 years old, a teacher did an exercise where we had to fill in the blanks with either "c'est", "s'est", "ces" or "ses". I got the best grade: 8 over 20.

PS: for those who don't know the French grading system, 8 over 20 is very bad, probably the equivalent of a D.
post #134 of 202
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fabienne
I don't know how else to explain it, but let's try thinking of it in terms of a journalist on the radio, perhaps? When reporting, you remove your tense once in the past: The prime minister said he would start talks with the Labor Party. The original quote was, in the PM's mouth: "I will start talks with the Labor Party."

I think it's so pervasive and accepted in American English, it probably doesn't make sense to you, but I think in the British Isles, it's more commonly respected. My main point is, with complex sentences, it can cause confusion.
Perhaps we are confused because of the difference between "will" and "would" since "would" is a sort of conditional (don't know the exact technical term) and "will" is non-negotiable.

If I said I would do something, that doesn't mean that I did do it. In fact it is often used to imply that I said I would but didn't.

And then if I said I will do something, we are talking about what I said, but what I said I would do hasn't happened yet.
post #135 of 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by j
Semi-OT: I hate the words "moist" and "wipe". Eww.
The night was moist...
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