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Hong Kong tailors - A Man Hing Cheong vs. Y William Yu - Page 7

post #91 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by gumbolo View Post
Ok, back-paddling big time, the YWY suit-jackets are crap! There is too few/no canvassing on the chest-area, so the whole thing looks super wobbly.


What exactly do you mean by that? Photos?
post #92 of 97
Does William Yu do CMT? How much do they charge ?
post #93 of 97
Thread Starter 
i hope this post here is not too old, but let's try anyway.

i would like to ask for some insights on the fitting of the first picture of the brown sports jacket from william yu, as i will visit his shop in december. on the first picture, left and right of the lower part of the lapel, you can see that the cloth/suit is somewhat wavy, leaning inside. this actually got worse since i started wearing it. i wonder what is the reason for it. i usually don't wear anything in my breastpockets, nor in the outer pockets.

is that bad canvassing of the tailor? if so, can i ask them to change it? can the tailor avoid that somehow on the next jacket?


i have another question on the very first pics of the AMHC suit: the pants have lots of wrinkles in the middle after a day of work. is that also a sign of bad tailoring? does that mean the pants are too tight around the hip? or too high up? or too low? how can i avoid that? in fact, i have many pants with that problem.

appreciate opinions, especially from the technical specialists here!
post #94 of 97
I've also made an overcoat at YWY. The threads were loose but the fit was okay (I think) after I pressed them for a slightly slimmer silhouette.
post #95 of 97
I've also tried the shirts by Ascot Chang and WW Chan. Quality-wise, WW Chan is comparable to AC but it's at a slightly more affordable price point. That said, AC is more "proactive" in their ordering process and asks you for specifications (button thickness, shape of gussets, split yoke) and what-nots. WW Chan, on the other hand, doesn't offer them unless asked. As far as buttons go, AC charges extra for thick MOP buttons while WW Chan doesn't.
post #96 of 97
Interesting insights. Any of you people compare HK vs BKK tailors? 
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fishball View Post

CMT stand for Cut, Make, Trim.
You provide the Fabric, the house do the rest.
AMHC charge around HKD6,000 for CMT. If you know where to buy fabrics, you could get 3-3.5m super 130 you used less than HKD3,000, it make the price of the suit under HKD9,000 instead of 14,000 you paid. If you want to save more, just make the jacket in AMHC, and the pants at other place, you can cut the price to under HKD7,000. That is what I do. 
Quote:
Originally Posted by gazman70k View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fishball View Post
CMT stand for Cut, Make, Trim.
You provide the Fabric, the house do the rest.
AMHC charge around HKD6,000 for CMT. If you know where to buy fabrics, you could get 3-3.5m super 130 you used less than HKD3,000, it make the price of the suit under HKD9,000 instead of 14,000 you paid. If you want to save more, just make the jacket in AMHC, and the pants at other place, you can cut the price to under HKD7,000. That is what I do. 

Did I read that right? HKD6,000 for CMT!

Wow! I must be a small timer.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fishball View Post

AMHC handle heavy cloth much better than the thin one. (or Who wasn't?)
The service at AMHC is good. They do whatever you ask for and don't charge extra cost.
Like stitching along the seams on shoulders, dart, sleeves and outer pant seams. (some tailors ask for 1,500 extra for those stitching)
However, if you don't ask, they won't do it.
They also use real horn buttons.

Christian, may be you should try Gordon next time.
Quote:
Originally Posted by gumbolo View Post

Just as a follow-up after wearing both suits for a couple of times:

The AMHC suit has definitely a stronger canvassing. I assume this refers to everyone's comment that they have a more British cut than many other HK tailors. The YWY suit is less canvassed and generally much softer. I had also asked for a flat shoulder which is typically more Italian style. I also used a Loro Piana cloth, whereas the AMHC one is made up of one of their British house cloths.

When wearing the AMHC suit it feels like wearing a strong hard uniform, where the YWY suit is indeed giving me some soft Italian feeling.

Again, both are formidable and well worth their money. I think I will do the following: soft/summer/more casual with YWY, formal/Winter/strong canvassing with AMHC


Anyone out there who would like to comment?
Quote:
Originally Posted by erdavis View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by gumbolo View Post

Again, both are formidable and well worth their money. I think I will do the following: soft/summer/more casual with YWY, formal/Winter/strong canvassing with AMHC


Anyone out there who would like to comment?

I agree with this for sure. I just had suit finished for me by AMHC. I am very happy with it.

The only thing is I wish I knew where I could buy good suit fabrics, not to save money, but to go beyond what the tailor shop has in their selection.

-eric
Quote:
Originally Posted by gumbolo View Post

I think three days might be a bit too tight to have more than one fitting. I myself travel to HK once every six weeks, so I could wait until they were ready. If you are an "easy" case they might be able to make a "second" fitting only and then send it over by mail. Probably that's best. but check with them, their phone-number is mentioned in my first thread.

I needed several months to have the suits ready. Went their once, waited two months, went for two fittings, waited another month, had another fitting, then wore them and still i will have to make a few more adjustments. However, once they have it it's kind of convenient. As mentioned the brown sports jacket was almost perfect already during the first fitting.



Regarding the CMT: AMHC is a wool merchant according to their business card. i think they should have pretty much everything you want. they usually only recommend their house-cloth, but they do have all the major names, LP, Zegna, H&S, Scabal, etc. They also say that those brands are more expensive, but that's BS. Just ask them kindly and they will get out the cloth for you. Try to speak to Peter, the salesman, the other chaps are not used to handling customers and are really a bit weird/rude.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slewfoot View Post

I'd be happy if some of my shirts lasted 3 years. I often consider my dress shirts somewhat disposable which is why it's tough for me to pay any more than around $75 or so. Peter Lee fits that perfectly. Too often a few drops of oil or red wine get on a shirt and then it's ruined except for under a sweater wear. One thing I plan to do more often is if I see a fabric I really like at Peter Lee's get 2-3 shirts made in the same material with different collars. This way once one goes I still have another. Plus, I always find myself reaching for the same kind of styles anyway.
Quote:
Originally Posted by gumbolo View Post

Let me compile my price-info so far:

A Man Hing Cheong:
- plain, Egyptian cotton, white, 850 HKD (ok, but could be better)
- plain two-ply, twill, 950 HKD (very nice feeling)
- Sea-island, I believe Stuart Mason, 1.100 HKD, average for three shirts
- Sea-island, Alumo, 1.500 HKD
The craftmanship is extremely nice and definitely comparable to any kind of brand-manufacturer.

David's shirts:
- Stuart Mason, 1.200 HKD + another 200 HKD for the 4mm buttons.
- I didn't ask for Alumo
Very decent craftmanship, nice feeling of collar/cuffs. Basically, nothing to complain about. The funny thing was that he could turn around the shirt in 2 days, which none of the others would do at the time.

Y William Yu:
- plain, Egyptian cotton, 750 HKD
- Stuart Mason 850, sometimes even 950 for the higher yarn-counts.
- I didn't ask for Alumo
The quality is pretty much ok, but you see/feel/realize a difference in the making. Difficult to explain and I was trying to take pictures, but it doesn't come out. E.g. the cuffs/collars are soft, but feel somehow inferior to the AMHC/David's ones; also they didn't want to provide the 4mm buttons, neither could they make the craw-foot at the bottom of the sidelines. Still, very decent value for money.

This site is interesting, as it compares the shirt cloth prices: https://www.greenandjacks.com/selectionboutique.php


Just a word on Ascot Chang: I haven't used them, but I would never spend that money on a shirt in such an environment as Hong Kong. I would really like to try them out, but I can't see any further benefit in craftmanship than what I have seen so far. I mean the whole point of HK tailoring is value-for-money versus buying "the real thing", i.e. Savile Row, right? And if you go to Savile Row, then the price is actually not that different than AC, I believe it can even be cheaper.


And just for the sake of spreading the word, more nice URLs regarding bespoke shirts: http://www.englishcut.com/archives/000159.html
http://www.colesshirts.com/default.asp/p=17
Quote:
Originally Posted by porcupine85 View Post

I've also tried the shirts by Ascot Chang and WW Chan. Quality-wise, WW Chan is comparable to AC but it's at a slightly more affordable price point. That said, AC is more "proactive" in their ordering process and asks you for specifications (button thickness, shape of gussets, split yoke) and what-nots. WW Chan, on the other hand, doesn't offer them unless asked. As far as buttons go, AC charges extra for thick MOP buttons while WW Chan doesn't.

Edited by XFactor - 10/3/13 at 4:24am
post #97 of 97

Y. William Yu is connected with the Hong Kong store, but it is now run as a separate business.  Peter Yu left Hong Kong and opened a store in Shanghai a few years ago, and that is also separate.  After Peter left, Andy took over the Mody Road store, which I gather has moved since my last visit to HK.

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