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Home Made Sausage, Cured, and Smoked Meats - Page 47

post #691 of 1023
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwilkinson View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

fistbump.gif

Indeed, have done some other things too but didn't take pics. I just found a spot in our club that I'm trying to section off from any kind of traffic so I can make some dried chorizo. Ruhlman claims it only takes 18-20 days at the right temp and humidity.

And to be entirely honest, I'm more than a little surprised at how easy this has been. It's like you follow the guidelines about temp and ratios and whatnot, but other than that you can do whatever the fuck you want to.

Exactly. And the results are so far above anything you can buy except at the best homemade type butcher shops...even those things at stores like Whole Foods come no where near close (they tend to grind way to fine, IMO, and often don't use enough fat.)
post #692 of 1023
I will be buying a high quality smoker this summer.
post #693 of 1023
Dear Sausage Stuffers of the Internet:

help me with InstaCure. I need help determining volume. I'm going to buy a pound of instacure (BTW, what's the diff between #1 and #2??), and am wondering how much that is in volume. I'm assuming a pound is probably somewhere in the range of a pint to a quart, but was curious by those who own the stuff.

Thanks bros.

Your God,
Kwilk.
post #694 of 1023
Thread Starter 
Cure #1 vs. #2

#1 is sodium nitrite. It is for use in smoking or slow cooking. It's half life is fairly short.

#2 is sodium nitrate. Sodium nitrate has a longer half life, but more importantly, decays into sodium nitrite. See #1 above. Therefore this is used for prolonged curing of salumi, etc.

One teaspoon of #1 per 5 pounds of fresh meat. A pound will last you a long, long time.
post #695 of 1023
You da man as always
post #696 of 1023
Thread Starter 
fistbump.gif
post #697 of 1023
Quote:
Originally Posted by Khayembii Communique View Post

My friend is a butcher and has a blog about butchery stuff and he just posted an intro to French sausage making. Check it out!

Nice blog.
post #698 of 1023
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

Cure #1 vs. #2
#1 is sodium nitrite. It is for use in smoking or slow cooking. It's half life is fairly short.
#2 is sodium nitrate. Sodium nitrate has a longer half life, but more importantly, decays into sodium nitrite. See #1 above. Therefore this is used for prolonged curing of salumi, etc.
One teaspoon of #1 per 5 pounds of fresh meat. A pound will last you a long, long time.

So, would you recommend the half pound? I don't plan on doing this kinda thing every week.

And when you say "decays into" do you mean that in a year, I will have a half pound of sodium nitrite, or do you mean that with the enzymes in meat it will break down?
post #699 of 1023
Just ordered 1/2 pound of #1 and a book to supplement Charcuterie. Also, in the next week or two will be turning a mini-fridge into a sausage curing and fermentation chamber. icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif
post #700 of 1023
Thread Starter 
Looking forward to seeing pics of the curing chamber. As to the question about cure #2...wonder the same thing myself. Don't think it's the meat activating it so I wonder if it becomes less efficacious over time.
post #701 of 1023
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwilkinson View Post

Just ordered 1/2 pound of #1 and a book to supplement Charcuterie. Also, in the next week or two will be turning a mini-fridge into a sausage curing and fermentation chamber. icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif

Let me guess, with one of these? http://www.amazon.com/Johnson-Controls-A19AAT-2C-Temperature-Controller/dp/B0002EAL58/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1330398530&sr=8-1

Works really well actually. I control the humidy in mine with a pan of wet salt. Keeps it roughly at 60%. Pour a bunch of kosher salt into the little foil breadpan or something and add water until it has the consistency of slushy snow. I bought this to monitor it until i found the right mix http://www.amazon.com/Quality-Importers-HygroSet-Hygrometer-Humidors/dp/B000H6CZQE/ref=sr_1_2?s=home-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1330398646&sr=1-2 and this to calibrate it. http://www.amazon.com/Quality-Importers-HUMI-CALIBRATE-One-Step-Calibration/dp/B000A3UBLA/ref=pd_sim_hg_1

edit: I see that maybe you'll be doing fresh sausage and not salumi. This set-up is more for curing over longer periods.
post #702 of 1023
Yep, that's exactly the set up.

I used the Temp PID system when I built my thermal circulator, so I figured the same concept would work here. Texted my Dad, all excited about my discovery and asking if I could buy the old mini fridge, and then he told me that it's a temp/humidity system that's used all the time by homebrewers. I felt stupid.

And no, this will be for dry-cured sausages. First will be a batch of Spanish chorizo. I'm still doing the fresh sausage thing weekly, but obviously do not need the set up for that.
post #703 of 1023
What to do with a ~7lb shoulder boys?

I made a batch of these yesterday:
IMAG0108.jpg

and some rillettes with a mix of back fat and duck fat.
post #704 of 1023
just salt and pepper that shoulder, rest at room temperature for an hour or two, and roast at a low temperature for a long time

fuuu rillettes sound so good. put up pics of that bad boy
post #705 of 1023
Make chorizo, like i'm doing! Pics to come in a few weeks. Unless, of course, the bactoferm doesnt work and my fermented pork kills me.
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