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Home Made Sausage, Cured, and Smoked Meats - Page 41

post #601 of 1013
Thread Starter 
Great stuff, yerf!
post #602 of 1013
Quote:
Originally Posted by CDFS View Post
Apparently andouille /= andouillette. Not a fan of the latter, but yours look tasty.

Yeah, this is the cajun style sausage. I probably would not be a fan of andouillette either, but I've never had it.


CDFS and Pio, I'll pass on your compliments to the people that really did the work .
post #603 of 1013
Home-made cappicola and duck prosciutto:

Meat plate:

Cappicola:

Duck proscuitto - fat melting at room temp:
post #604 of 1013
Worthwhile?

https://opensky.com/ruhlman/offer/hu...n=e_ruhlman18b

If you can't see the link:

Quote:
Hudson Valley Foie Gras Au Torchon

The Details

A foie gras aficionado's dream, Au Torchon is a traditional ancient preparation. Fresh foie gras is seasoned with salt and pepper and marinated in Sauternes wine. Once the flavors are infused, the foie gras, tightly wrapped in a towel, is delicately poached in duck consommé. It is one of the most unadulterated foie gras preparations possible. Sliced into perfect rounds, the torchon is perfectly served with brioche or crusty French bread accompanied by Mostarda de Cremona.

Approx 1 lb. each

Retails for $108, discounted to $82, free shipping
post #605 of 1013
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KJT View Post
Worthwhile?

https://opensky.com/ruhlman/offer/hu...n=e_ruhlman18b

If you can't see the link:

I might order this weekend. If I do, I'll let you know!
post #606 of 1013
Quote:
Originally Posted by KJT View Post
Worthwhile?

https://opensky.com/ruhlman/offer/hu...n=e_ruhlman18b

If you can't see the link:
Just make one. It's not particularly difficult.
post #607 of 1013
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post
Just make one. It's not particularly difficult.

I didn't really have a frame of reference for how much foie it would take to make the torchon and what it would cost retail. Looks like Hudson Valley sells a 1.5lb foie for $71. http://www.hudsonvalleyfoiegras.com/foiegrasmarket.html Guess it's not really worth it to buy the premade torchon.
post #608 of 1013
Quote:
Originally Posted by KJT View Post
I didn't really have a frame of reference for how much foie it would take to make the torchon and what it would cost retail. Looks like Hudson Valley sells a 1.5lb foie for $71. http://www.hudsonvalleyfoiegras.com/foiegrasmarket.html Guess it's not really worth it to buy the premade torchon.
You need one liver. You also need to make sure you have a good recipe. The best one I know sits in your fridge for a month after cooking, but it is amazing.
post #609 of 1013
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post
You need one liver. You also need to make sure you have a good recipe. The best one I know sits in your fridge for a month after cooking, but it is amazing.



Btw, decided to make pizza and top it with slices of steak vs. the salad I thought of. I will take a pic.
post #610 of 1013
post #611 of 1013
I made a chicken leg rillete (for lack of duck leg) and a chicken liver mousse for last nights dinner.

Both excellent, but duck leg would have been better.

No pics, but think 'grey'.
post #612 of 1013
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post


Btw, decided to make pizza and top it with slices of steak vs. the salad I thought of. I will take a pic.
I keep telling you. Good confit needs to age. Foie gras is the same way. It mellows and the texture improves.
post #613 of 1013
Bought a duck leg to try sous vide confit - how is this for a method? From a site matt gave me http://www.douglasbaldwin.com/sous-v...se_Leg_Confit: Turkey, Duck or Goose Leg Confit * Duck, Goose or Turkey Legs * Rendered Duck or Goose Fat (or Lard) * Salt and Pepper Place legs in a 5–10% brine (50–100 grams salt per 1 liter) for three to six hours. The brine may be flavored with sprigs of thyme, bay leaves, garlic, and orange/ lemon slices. After brining, rinse legs and pat dry with paper towels. Season with Kosher/sea salt and coarse ground pepper. Individually vacuum seal the legs with 2–4 tablespoons of rendered fat. Place the vacuum sealed legs in a 176°F (80°C) water bath for 8 to 12 hours. Since some of the liquid in the bag will change phase (to gas), the bag will puff and may float to the surface. To prevent uneven cooking, the bags should be held under water using a wire rack or some other restraint. [After cooking, the legs may be rapidly cooled in ice water (see Table 1.1) and frozen or refrigerated at below 39°F (4°C) indefinitely.] To serve, (reheat and) sear until skin is crispy. May also be served without skin and torn into pieces.
post #614 of 1013
Quote:
Originally Posted by KJT View Post
Bought a duck leg to try sous vide confit - how is this for a method? From a site matt gave me http://www.douglasbaldwin.com/sous-v...se_Leg_Confit: Turkey, Duck or Goose Leg Confit * Duck, Goose or Turkey Legs * Rendered Duck or Goose Fat (or Lard) * Salt and Pepper Place legs in a 5–10% brine (50–100 grams salt per 1 liter) for three to six hours. The brine may be flavored with sprigs of thyme, bay leaves, garlic, and orange/ lemon slices. After brining, rinse legs and pat dry with paper towels. Season with Kosher/sea salt and coarse ground pepper. Individually vacuum seal the legs with 2–4 tablespoons of rendered fat. Place the vacuum sealed legs in a 176°F (80°C) water bath for 8 to 12 hours. Since some of the liquid in the bag will change phase (to gas), the bag will puff and may float to the surface. To prevent uneven cooking, the bags should be held under water using a wire rack or some other restraint. [After cooking, the legs may be rapidly cooled in ice water (see Table 1.1) and frozen or refrigerated at below 39°F (4°C) indefinitely.] To serve, (reheat and) sear until skin is crispy. May also be served without skin and torn into pieces.
That is basically how I do it, though I don't brine. Rather, I salt heavily, add thyme, pepper and garlic and let sit overnight, then rinse before putting in a bag. It still won't be as good as a traditional confit aged a few months after cooking, but it is good.
post #615 of 1013
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post
That is basically how I do it, though I don't brine. Rather, I salt heavily, add thyme, pepper and garlic and let sit overnight, then rinse before putting in a bag. It still won't be as good as a traditional confit aged a few months after cooking, but it is good.

This how I do it and I use 176F also.

Unlike Matt, who is perfectly correct here and I'm in error, I eat them right away. To crisp the skin I have found a 424 degree toaster over the best way to do this. It seems to crisp the skin quickly and doesn't get a chance to hit the meat into further cooking.

I've not tried a torch on the skin yet as I think the skin needs to dry a bit to crisp. Thoughts?
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