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Home Made Sausage, Cured, and Smoked Meats - Page 3

post #31 of 1013
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post
Is that like Boudin Noir?

Yes.
post #32 of 1013
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by why View Post
Yes.

Done right, that's great stuff.
post #33 of 1013
Thread Starter 
Just cooked our first one. Sauteed on low medium, caramelizing the casing, and used an insta-read thermometer to bring it to an internal temp of 155. My god, so good. The texture is so perfect, it was so juicy, and the cilantro is so pleasant. First try = complete success.

Thanks for participating in the thread and sharing my interest in this. If anyone wants to try this, I can now help with equipment and sourcing.
post #34 of 1013
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post
If anyone wants to try this, I can now help with equipment and sourcing.
Eh? How about just boxing up a six pack of those and sending them my way? I don't have time to do the work.
post #35 of 1013
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkNWorn View Post
Eh? How about just boxing up a six pack of those and sending them my way? I don't have time to do the work.
We were just joking about the people that stand outside some stores, selling homemade tamales, as we have a recipe for chorizo and could go sell that in parking lots. I will be trying that recipe as if the texture difference is as great between store bought vs. homemade as these sausages, it will elevate chorizo to a heavenly food.
post #36 of 1013
Ok, I'm into this. I just got my first sausage maker. I'm looking for a straight forward recipe for a basic tasty sausage. Any reccs?
post #37 of 1013
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by texas_jack View Post
Ok, I'm into this. I just got my first sausage maker. I'm looking for a straight forward recipe for a basic tasty sausage. Any reccs?

First, I can't recommend Ruhlman's book, Charcuterie, enough. I'll assume you've got info on the basics, and just need a recipe. Here's his "master" recipe ratio for fresh sausage:

5# meat and fat
40 grams Kosher salt (he's big on weighing, as salt comes in so many size grains, so volume is problematic)
Seasonings
1 cup ice cold water

This is the first recipe he gives:

5# pork butt
40 gr Kosher salt
10 gr black pepper
54 gr (3 tbsp) minced garlic
1 cup chilled red wine

Use 10 ft of hog casings to stuff.
post #38 of 1013
Impressive Pio. Very nice.
post #39 of 1013
I assume the purpose of the cold is for antibacterial purposes? I have only participated in the making of sausage once, at a hog "slaughter" I suppose you'd call it. I work with some country folks, and one of them and a few of his friends all raise hogs and a few head of cattle and over the course of a few weekends in December/January, they slaughter all the hogs and break them down into meat for the year. It's an impressive event - several families, the men, women, and children together, all show up and everyone has a job. Some of the more experienced guys are cutting the big pieces like hams and ribs on a band saw, others of us were at big tables trimming skin, bones, cartilage, and fat off the smaller pieces and scraps, everything in its own bucket. Meanwhile, some of the girls are boiling the head and the other bones, and the head parts and other small scraps get swept up into corn meal for scrapple, the skin and fat are cooked on a giant burner so the fat renders out into lard, which of course gets used, and the skin turns into "cracklins" aka pork rinds. The bigger chunks of meat are mixed on a giant table and turned into sausage. All along, others are working to vacuum seal all the cuts and put them in a freezer. I left in the early afternoon, as some of the hams and bacon were headed for the smokehouse, a small wooden building about the size of a generous outhouse. The cold is taken care of because we're working in an un-climate-controlled garage in wintertime. I'll be damned if every single shred of each hog didn't get used for something. It was a great way to learn to respect the source of the meat I consume. Looks like a lot of work, Pio, but fun, and no doubt very rewarding.
post #40 of 1013
Quote:
Originally Posted by Douglas View Post
I assume the purpose of the cold is for antibacterial purposes?

It's mostly because that gives it the best texture. Keeping it cold keeps the fat from melting and smearing all over into the meat mixture. You can make the sausage without it being cold, but it wouldn't be as fine a texture, but more rustic. It's like making pie dough.
post #41 of 1013
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwilkinson View Post
It's mostly because that gives it the best texture. Keeping it cold keeps the fat from melting and smearing all over into the meat mixture. You can make the sausage without it being cold, but it wouldn't be as fine a texture, but more rustic. It's like making pie dough.

That is how it is explained and I followed the precautions strictly. I have to tell you, the texture of this sausage makes all store bought seem like garbage. It was a great revelation for me. I think my careful, gentle saute and monitoring internal temp to only 155 played a part too. Fat was not lost in the cooking and it was just the juiciest, best textured sausage I've ever had. Ruhlman waxes poetic in his book, and now I know why.
post #42 of 1013
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post
Fat was not lost in the cooking and it was just the juiciest, best textured sausage I've ever had.

Some fat should be lost -- that's the purpose of the extra fat in most sausages. Otherwise the sausage tastes like boiled meat. I'm sure this is the case of what happened with yours, so don't take that as an affront.

The only sausage I make at home regularly is livermush because I can't buy it north of the Mason Dixon line. There's a few really good butchers around here that make great sausages (except for blood and livermush). Kielbasa, smoked bratwursts, Italian, etc.
post #43 of 1013
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by why View Post
Some fat should be lost -- that's the purpose of the extra fat in most sausages. Otherwise the sausage tastes like boiled meat. I'm sure this is the case of what happened with yours, so don't take that as an affront.

The only sausage I make at home regularly is livermush because I can't buy it north of the Mason Dixon line. There's a few really good butchers around here that make great sausages (except for blood and livermush). Kielbasa, smoked bratwursts, Italian, etc.

Some fat was lost, but it was minimal compared to what often happens. Part of this was due to the careful cooking; split casing leads to a dry sausage. Again, I have to say, this whole thing has been a revelation in just how good a sausage can be.

Yes, you are lucky with the current food scene in Cleveland. Some old school places are still there, and some quality newer ones have developed.
post #44 of 1013
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwilkinson View Post
It's mostly because that gives it the best texture. Keeping it cold keeps the fat from melting and smearing all over into the meat mixture. You can make the sausage without it being cold, but it wouldn't be as fine a texture, but more rustic. It's like making pie dough.

Ah, I understand now. Makes sense. Thank you.
post #45 of 1013
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post
Yes, you are lucky with the current food scene in Cleveland. Some old school places are still there, and some quality newer ones have developed.
Outside of a few, it's not all it's cracked up to be. The old ethnic stuff is great, but the West Side Market is pretty crappy outside of a few vendors that now do most of their business through their own storefronts. There are too many imitators. It's nice to see Michael Symon not let his celebrity get to his head and keep his restaurants as they were pre-Iron Chef. I went to the Velvet Tango Room again a few weeks ago and it was so affected and crowded we just left. I'm talking most of the girls dressed up as vamps and the kitschy paintings purposely hung lopsided kind of contrivance.
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