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A&S - Page 66

post #976 of 1570
Maybe on his way to the bank?
post #977 of 1570
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdl203 View Post
Maybe on his way to the bank?

Certainly, my check cleared.
post #978 of 1570
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
Evidence that A&S does know how to pitch/hang a sleeve properly:
[...]
They just don't love me.

No, it's not that they don't love you, its just that you're just not putting your arms where you're supposed to. Hitchcock knows better.
A&S has the one true sleeve pitch.
People who work the front are contractually obligated to adjust their natural arm position to match the coat's. This may require wearing a cast overnight for a period of 10-12 months.
Remember when Karl had a rash on his arm several years ago? From the cast.
post #979 of 1570
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
Evidence that A&S does know how to pitch/hang a sleeve properly:


Need to see side and back view before agreeing.

- M
post #980 of 1570
Quote:
Originally Posted by mmkn View Post
Need to see side and back view before agreeing.

- M

post #981 of 1570
I am a bit confused and disappointed regarding the reaction of A&S.
My assumptions are:

1. They don't know how to fix the coat's problems (as described earlier in this thread).

2. They (might) know it but think it's too expensive to alter it.

3. A combination of both. In this case you're better off moving on to another tailor.


The "no more cloth" (if it's true, then) is hardly an excuse for not cutting a new (and hopefully better) coat.
I'm sure that there must be somewhere in the UK a tweed that looks, feels and wears similar to this one.

Right now I think they're loosing more money than a new cut coat would have cost.
post #982 of 1570
Quote:
Originally Posted by tailorgod View Post
The "no more cloth" (if it's true, then) is hardly an excuse for not cutting a new (and hopefully better) coat.
I'm sure that there must be somewhere in the UK a tweed that looks, feels and wears similar to this one.


I thought that Manton was the one who brought the cloth? I'm not sure he'd want it to be entirely recut with a similar looking cloth.
post #983 of 1570
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdl203 View Post


I thought that Manton was the one who brought the cloth? I'm not sure he'd want it to be entirely recut with a similar looking cloth.

No, I didn't bring the cloth. I was informed that what I ordered turned out to be the last piece. This was sort of confirmed when I shared the # with another SFer who was told by his tailor (different firm) that it had run out and they couldn't get any more.
post #984 of 1570
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
No, I didn't bring the cloth. I was informed that what I ordered turned out to be the last piece. This was sort of confirmed when I shared the # with another SFer who was told by his tailor (different firm) that it had run out and they couldn't get any more.

I stand corrected. So do you think it would be an appropriate response to recut a new coat entirely from another similar cloth? Or would that be over the top?
post #985 of 1570
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdl203 View Post
I stand corrected. So do you think it would be an appropriate response to recut a new coat entirely from another similar cloth? Or would that be over the top?

I'm not Manton, but I would expect them to if that was the only viable solution. They f*cked up the sleeves, no question about it. If they can't fix their own error with available cloth, they should eat the cost of doing the jacket over in a different cloth. To me, a tailor's ability and willingness to vouch for technical errors is the core of his value as a tailor.
post #986 of 1570
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdl203 View Post
I stand corrected. So do you think it would be an appropriate response to recut a new coat entirely from another similar cloth? Or would that be over the top?

I would be shocked if any tailor offered to do that.

Honestly, I would be happy if they just corrected the sleeves even if it threw off the pattern a little. And also if they let out the waist a touch. If they raised the fronts a hair to address the balance problem, I would be ecstatic.

And I would order more.

As it is, in the relationship's present dispensation, I can't see ordering more.
post #987 of 1570
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post
I'm not Manton, but I would expect them to if that was the only viable solution. They f*cked up the sleeves, no question about it. If they can't fix their own error with available cloth, they should eat the cost of doing the jacket over in a different cloth. To me, a tailor's ability and willingness to vouch for technical errors is the core of his value as a tailor.

So in summary, you expect and demand absolute perfection from the first commission ? You don't believe in any learning/improvement curve at all where the pattern and fit gets improved along the orders?
post #988 of 1570
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdl203 View Post
So in summary, you expect and demand absolute perfection from the first commission ? You don't believe in any learning/improvement curve at all where the pattern and fit gets improved along the orders?

Not absolute perfection, as there is always room for better or worse even within the realm of basically correct. These sleeves are plainly wrong. Unless they made it clear to Manton that due to the limited availability of the cloth, he might have to stomach more errors on their part, it's ultimately their responsibility to get it right.

Put it this way, everyone's free to run their business as they please so long as they aren't defrauding anyone, but I wouldn't go back to a tailor like that a second time. The unwillingness to correct a basic error--to even admit it's there--would bode very poorly for the future.
post #989 of 1570
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdl203 View Post
So in summary, you expect and demand absolute perfection from the first commission ?

Wanting the sleeve pitch to be right is hardly demanding 'absolute perfection'.
post #990 of 1570
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sanguis Mortuum View Post
Wanting the sleeve pitch to be right is hardly demanding 'absolute perfection'.

Exactly. It's a matter of basic competence.
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