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The furniture we'll keep when we move - Page 4

post #46 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by designprofessor
I like it, but I'm tempted to throw a Donald Judd sculpture right in the middle of it

You must visit Sketch restaurant next time you are in London.
post #47 of 66
Thread Starter 
Very nice place!
post #48 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by designprofessor
Very nice place!
To what are you referring?
post #49 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bouji
Why thank you. However, most of the credit goes to my wife, although I too had a hand in decorating it.
Madeleine Castaing was a key influence for my wife, if you notice there is some original Chaïm Soutine in my flat.
I believe the painting you are referring to is Chaïm Soutine La Femme qui lit, 1941, which I am somewhat found of. Though, my tastes are a little more austere than my wife's. For me Egon Schiele and Gustav Klimt any day, but how often can a man get his way with interior decor, also I'd go for some much more masculine furniture too, if I had my way, Early English and Welsh Oak, or if I wanted to reduce arguments with my wife, Queen Ann, though anything short of Boudoir is not really going to keep the misses happy.
Ah, but most of the famed interior decorators were male, from David Hicks to Mark Hampton to Emile-Jacques Ruhlmann.

Since you speak about Schiele and Klimt, are you fond of Art Nouveau? Budapest has some magnificent examples.

Louis XIV is both French and rather masculine-heavy in its gravitas. It's really the Louis XV style that tends to be more "feminine," thanks to Madame de Pompadour.
post #50 of 66
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bouji
To what are you referring?

The four pictures of your flat.
post #51 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing
Ah, but most of the famed interior decorators were male, from David Hicks to Mark Hampton to Emile-Jacques Ruhlmann.

Since you speak about Schiele and Klimt, are you fond of Art Nouveau? Budapest has some magnificent examples.

Louis XIV is both French and rather masculine-heavy in its gravitas. It's really the Louis XV style that tends to be more "feminine," thanks to Madame de Pompadour.

Indeed, I however, only peruse art, and interior design with acquaintances, by day I'm a banker.

Though I cannot say that Art Nouveau is a penchant of mine, at times it can be rather pleasing. I'm also partial to Art Deco, though it is over rated.

Impressionism has to be my real penchant, my wife Rocco.

Louis furniture is nice, but too much of something that is hard to live with, but nice to look at; rather like my wife!
post #52 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by designprofessor
The four pictures of your flat.
Thank you.
post #53 of 66
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing
Ah, but most of the famed interior decorators were male, from David Hicks to Mark Hampton to Emile-Jacques Ruhlmann.

Since you speak about Schiele and Klimt, are you fond of Art Nouveau? Budapest has some magnificent examples.

Louis XIV is both French and rather masculine-heavy in its gravitas. It's really the Louis XV style that tends to be more "feminine," thanks to Madame de Pompadour.

Saw the Ruhlmann exhibit in New York. Great work.
I admire the designers that worked on all aspects of the job from furniture to interior. Complete vision.
post #54 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bouji
Why thank you. However, most of the credit goes to my wife, although I too had a hand in decorating it.
Madeleine Castaing was a key influence for my wife, if you notice there is some original Chaïm Soutine in my flat.
I believe the painting you are referring to is Chaïm Soutine La Femme qui lit, 1941, which I am somewhat found of. Though, my tastes are a little more austere than my wife's. For me Egon Schiele and Gustav Klimt any day, but how often can a man get his way with interior decor, also I'd go for some much more masculine furniture too, if I had my way, Early English and Welsh Oak, or if I wanted to reduce arguments with my wife, Queen Ann, though anything short of Boudoir is not really going to keep the misses happy.

Ah, another fan of the Viennese Jugendstil painters. Off topic, would you happen to know which Schiele self-portrait was turned in to the logo for the MUMOK? I've been looking for a print of it but not having any luck.

For me, I have an eclectic mix of furniture. Some of it is disposable, like the Ikea table and chairs in my kitchen. Some is "designer" but utilitarian, meaning I'll keep it as long as it serves its function as well as or better than anything else I could buy. I count my home desks (both George Nelson's ur-Action Desks for Herman Miller, with white tops) and task chairs (a Teknion Contessa and Humanscale Freedom Chair) in that category. Other stuff I'll probably keep forever, like my Biedermeier-era dresser and wardrobe.
post #55 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by alflauren
I couldn't agree more. I love the look, but they're just not comfortable. As a compromise, I find myself gravitating to the modern, but comfortable Danish/Norwegian furniture designs.
Ahhh...in that case, I have to plug some friends of mine (I did once before, but I think it was lost in the great crash: http://www.norwaysays.com/main.html They started out doing furniture and interior design, but right now, they're branching out in all sorts of industrial design; doing porcelain, bicycles, mp3 players, etc.
post #56 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucky Strike
Ahhh...in that case, I have to plug some friends of mine (I did once before, but I think it was lost in the great crash:

http://www.norwaysays.com/main.html

They started out doing furniture and interior design, but right now, they're branching out in all sorts of industrial design; doing porcelain, bicycles, mp3 players, etc.


I looked at tehir Aalto desk before I settled on a similar design by Barber Osgerby.

It is terrific for them to get products manufactured by Offect and David Design. Being associated with Claesson, Koivisto and Rune can only do good things for their future.
post #57 of 66
Here's a favorite interior of mine:

Andre Breton's apartment at 42, Rue Fontaine.



post #58 of 66
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing
Here's a favorite interior of mine:

Andre Breton's apartment at 42, Rue Fontaine.




Great pictures. I went through Frida Kahlo's blue house outside Mexico City, these photos remind me of that as far as the collections of artifacts. On a side note, I really love the suits and style of the artists of this era. Great styles. I managed to see alot of Bretons personal collection in a show at the Pompidou, but it was quite a long time ago.
post #59 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bouji View Post
...Though, my tastes are a little more austere than my wife's. For me Egon Schiele and Gustav Klimt any day....

Oh man, I would kill for a high-quality Schiele print. I was in Vienna this summer and was fortunate enough to catch a Schiele retrospective at the MUMOK if I remember correctly.

There's a Bay Area artist whom I enjoy whose work is slightly evocative of Schiele's work, her figures have a similar decrepit form, but she does lacquered black and red inks on wood. It's an interesting mix of nods to woodcuts mixed with Schiele and other influences.
post #60 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by designprofessor View Post
I know the chairs by Corbusier are classic, but to sit in them, they are just not comfortable. The back height is awkward. (I like to slouch in a chair and get comfortable.)
I love the design, but could not bring myself to buy one for this reason

Le Corbusier didn't design for comfort. Have you heard what he intended to do with Le Marais?
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