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The furniture we'll keep when we move - Page 3

post #31 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt
I really like Barcelona Chairs. I like Eames lounges and Egg chairs better. All three are really at the point where they are "period" designs. The best looking modern furniture that I have seen in a traditional environment have been various Ron Arad one-off pieces. I was at a Palazzo outside of Torino this summer and it was filled with Ron Arad furniture. It looked amazing, but there was nowhere that was comfortable to sit.

I've often found egg chairs to be gimmicky, and unless well done, slightly on the Ikea side. Mies van der Rohe managed to avoid the sparcity that underlies most "modern" design. I think he distilled opulence to its simplest form, making it the most timeless of perhaps all the creations we're mentioning here. With a few idiomatic flourishes, I one could easily picture a Barcelona chair in virtually any period of time. Eames chairs are great, but like you say, you sit low, and it seems that every Frasier wannabe yuppie has them. Although, Barcelona chairs seem to occupy every upscale lobby and waiting room in existence.
post #32 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by vincent
I've often found egg chairs to be gimmicky, and unless well done, slightly on the Ikea side. Mies van der Rohe managed to avoid the sparcity that underlies most "modern" design. I think he distilled opulence to its simplest form, making it the most timeless of perhaps all the creations we're mentioning here. With a few idiomatic flourishes, I one could easily picture a Barcelona chair in virtually any period of time. Eames chairs are great, but like you say, you sit low, and it seems that every Frasier wannabe yuppie has them. Although, Barcelona chairs seem to occupy every upscale lobby and waiting room in existence.


The Egg chair that I speak of is the one manufactured by Fritz Hansen from the original design of Arne Jacobsen. It is a very difficult, expensive chair to make, and the bump offs are junk.

The Bacelona chair is easier to bump off, but the bump offs do not age as well as the real thing. Spinneybeck leather, which Knoll uses, ages very gracefully.

We used to have Eames lounge chairs in our house and they wre probably the highest sitting chair that we had. My wfe now has tehm at her office. I am very comfortable sitting low, as most of our furniture has a seat height between 10 and 14 inches.
post #33 of 66
Thread Starter 
I know the chairs by Corbusier are classic, but to sit in them, they are just not comfortable. The back height is awkward. (I like to slouch in a chair and get comfortable.)
I love the design, but could not bring myself to buy one for this reason
post #34 of 66
Just want to say thanks for the pictures and info guys, I'm at a loss when it comes to home design.
post #35 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by tiger02
Just want to say thanks for the pictures and info guys, I'm at a loss when it comes to home design.
I second this sentiment. Moreover, I'm totally lost when it comes to buying furniture at discount. Do most of you simply pay retail? Is furniture much harder, than say highend clothes, to come by at discount? Where should I be looking?
post #36 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Renault78law
I second this sentiment. Moreover, I'm totally lost when it comes to buying furniture at discount. Do most of you simply pay retail? Is furniture much harder, than say highend clothes, to come by at discount? Where should I be looking?

Yes, discounts are available. However, most good furniture is made to order.

If you see something that you like in stock, you are likely to get a pretty good discount. Orders will be discounted, but by a bit less.

Since you are in LA, you should check out the DIVA group sale. They probably have the best modern furniture selection in LA. http://www.cappellinila.com/n_springsale.html

I don't have much love for newly made traditional furniture, so I don't know anything about it. Somebody else probably will.
post #37 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by designprofessor
I know the chairs by Corbusier are classic, but to sit in them, they are just not comfortable. The back height is awkward. (I like to slouch in a chair and get comfortable.)
I love the design, but could not bring myself to buy one for this reason

I couldn't agree more. I love the look, but they're just not comfortable. As a compromise, I find myself gravitating to the modern, but comfortable Danish/Norwegian furniture designs. They're fairly simple, well-made, well thought out, and look great (at least to my eye).

Another LA place to check out is http://www.denmark50.com

I really want a Stokke Peel chair.

post #38 of 66
Wright20 is an auctionhouse for modernist furniture and other items of the 20th century:

www.wright20.com/
post #39 of 66
post #40 of 66
Is that your house?
post #41 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing
Is that your house?

No, its the Mallett auction house, showroom.

My penchant is more French (or should I say wife's), than all of Europe (though the above is wonderfull too), this is my flat:







post #42 of 66
Mallett has beautiful things; last time they had a Georgian secretary desk. Either way, your flat is quite lovely. It reminds me of Madeleine Castaing's tastes, which was spectacularly chic. Her antiques shop facade-- opened in the middle of WWII as a sort of elegant protest-- was painted entirely black with monochromatic awnings that only had her initials as decoration. There's a famous Soutine portrait of Castaing in her signature wig held on with chinstrap.
post #43 of 66
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bouji

I like it, but I'm tempted to throw a Donald Judd sculpture right in the middle of it
post #44 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by designprofessor
I like it, but I'm tempted to throw a Donald Judd sculpture right in the middle of it
I'd hang a Francis Bacon.
post #45 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing
Mallett has beautiful things; last time they had a Georgian secretary desk.

Either way, your flat is quite lovely. It reminds me of Madeleine Castaing's tastes, which was spectacularly chic. Her antiques shop facade-- opened in the middle of WWII as a sort of elegant protest-- was painted entirely black with monochromatic awnings that only had her initials as decoration. There's a famous Soutine portrait of Castaing in her signature wig held on with chinstrap.

Why thank you. However, most of the credit goes to my wife, although I too had a hand in decorating it.
Madeleine Castaing was a key influence for my wife, if you notice there is some original Chaïm Soutine in my flat.
I believe the painting you are referring to is Chaïm Soutine La Femme qui lit, 1941, which I am somewhat found of. Though, my tastes are a little more austere than my wife's. For me Egon Schiele and Gustav Klimt any day, but how often can a man get his way with interior decor, also I'd go for some much more masculine furniture too, if I had my way, Early English and Welsh Oak, or if I wanted to reduce arguments with my wife, Queen Ann, though anything short of Boudoir is not really going to keep the misses happy.
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