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Dell computer service, a sad story - Page 5

post #61 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by willpower View Post
Building your own is probably the best way to go if you're on a budget, but if you haven't put one together before it can be a bit daunting. Subsequently not very difficult at all after you've assembled one. Performing service on it is a matter of replacing the defective component.

Yep, I just built a Core i7 system myself. It's not that hard, and there are plenty of "how to" guides on the internet.

The hardest part is usually choosing which parts to buy, and making sure they are all compatible!

Maximum PC 2009 Dream Machine Builds
post #62 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by rnoldh View Post

But if it's a design defect ( like a known motherboard issue ) or overheating from poor design, how is that a user problem?
Same parts are in HP are in DELL are in Sony are in you name it
You really don't have DELL made hardware in your DELL computer
post #63 of 123
A few months ago the power cable for my Dell laptop broke. I went to their homepage so I could order a replacement only to be met by a multitude of options. I tried finding a number to call but soon realized that I was unable to communicate with Dell due to the fact that my support license was void. There was simply no way to ask them a simple question about a product I was willing to purchase
post #64 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by constant struggle View Post
Same parts are in HP are in DELL are in Sony are in you name it
You really don't have DELL made hardware in your DELL computer

Err... I don't know about now, but Dell used to manufacture (or have manufactured for them) several components which only worked on Dells, such as RAM.
post #65 of 123
^^ True, but I believe in 2008 or so Dell started dropping the @#$@# proprietary motherboards and power supplies.

Dell kicks proprietary parts

I had a 1997 era Dell Dimension 8100 P4 and I was very cheezed when I found out I could not upgrade the mobo. The mobo featured only PCI (no AGP or PCI-e) slots so I could no longer upgrade the videocards. Glad I started building my own systems.
post #66 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ace Rimmer View Post
^^ True, but I believe in 2008 or so Dell started dropping the @#$@# proprietary motherboards and power supplies. Dell kicks proprietary parts I had a 1997 era Dell Dimension 8100 P4 and I was very cheezed when I found out I could not upgrade the mobo. The mobo featured only PCI (no AGP or PCI-e) slots so I could no longer upgrade the videocards. Glad I started building my own systems.
1997 P4? Something is not right there. You're probably thinking beginning of the millennium. Back when I was 14 I built an AMD Athlon 1.4ghz T-Bird with a GeForce2 GTS to power Counter Strike. I've been building ever since. It's by far the best way to get good value for money when you start venturing into higher end components.
post #67 of 123
This really is one of the benefits with Apple. If you live in close to a store, you can setup an appointment, walk in, and have an actual person take a look at your computer.
post #68 of 123
My experience with Dell goes back pretty far. The issues I had with the first computer were handled very smoothly. Then I had some issues with another computer a few years later and went through hell. Absolute hell. Swore I would get no more Dells. Then I read that they had ironed out their problems. So I tried again. Had some issues with this machine, but the service was vastly better. I have not had any problems with this machine for a year at least, so maybe Dell sucks again, but it seemed to me that they had overcome whatever problems they were having.

I am on my fourth Dell and would get another.
post #69 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by rnoldh View Post
I didn't do my due diligence.
Due diligence is a great idea in picking computers, investments, wives, cars, etc.


Whew, there's hope for me yet!
post #70 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ajaxv2 View Post
Whew, there's hope for me yet!

No hope,whatever you will do,you will not succeed.
post #71 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by rnoldh View Post
I had bought what I thought was a decent computer. A DEll XPS M1330 ( loaded to the hilt ). Now it turns out there are "issues", especially motherboard problems.
I've had a few Dell laptops. 13" Inspiron from several years ago served me well and left a good impression of Dell in my mind after coming from a buggy Compaq. Never had a problem and I'd still be using it if it didn't get stolen. My M1330 had the motherboard replaced a few months ago by an on site tech. Screen started to go and it was the graphics card. The AC adapter died and was replaced by mail. The battery held charge for 1.5 hours new and that was replaced by mail as well. The plastic trim around the lid broke off, another piece near the hinge fell off and is loose. It also bogs down if I don't restart every day. My Macbook is pretty solid. Only complaint is the sharp edges.
post #72 of 123
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by constant struggle View Post
Same parts are in HP are in DELL are in Sony are in you name it
You really don't have DELL made hardware in your DELL computer

So, what does this have to do with the problem being a hardware issue or a user problem? If every single computer maker used the exact same parts and there was an inherent motherboard issue, then it would be a hardware design issue and have nothing to do with the user. To me a user caused problem would be too much bloatware, not scanning for viruses or malware, or improper shutdowns. Things like that. Do you not agree?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
My experience with Dell goes back pretty far. The issues I had with the first computer were handled very smoothly. Then I had some issues with another computer a few years later and went through hell. Absolute hell. Swore I would get no more Dells. Then I read that they had ironed out their problems. So I tried again. Had some issues with this machine, but the service was vastly better. I have not had any problems with this machine for a year at least, so maybe Dell sucks again, but it seemed to me that they had overcome whatever problems they were having.

I am on my fourth Dell and would get another.

Michael, please do not buy another Dell. You will regret it.

I don't know Michael Dell, but I damn sure know people in Austin that know him. Tomorrow, I'll compose an Email to him and the top operating executives I can identify in Round Rock, Tx. I'll post a copy here. AAMOF, I was just in Austin and Round Rock, and the buzz was that Dell was laying off. It's no wonder and it's very apparent they are rapidly losing market share.

Here's today's tale.

Yesterday I was told an on-site tech would be dispatched today. I got a call about 9:00 AM today and a tech guy said he would be out to my home between 4-7 ( the old window procedure, killing 3 hours of my day ). I said fine and made arrangements.

I asked if he was a Dell employee and he said no, he was an employee of a third party contractor doing Dell's warranty work in my area.

I came home about 3:45. At 6:00PM I called Dell to see what what going on. Of course they wasted some of my time and finally gave me a ph. # for a company located in Massachusetts. I called them and they said I had to give the tech till 7:00, since the window was 4-7. They gave me the name and cell # of the tech. I called him and got an open ring, no answer and no voice mail.

Finally, he called me and apologized and said he was running late. That he was about 10 minutes late and would get to my home by 7:15 at the latest. I waited another 45 minutes and he finally showed.

Remember, he was not a Dell employee, but worked for a 3rd party contractor. He was amazingly good. He was a Muslim gentleman and was impressed with my knowledge of the Koran and some Hadiths ( though that has nothing to do with computers specifically ). And he was also an Aggie ( which means he went to Texas A & M ). I think he was from Pakistan.

Anyway he put in a new motherboard. He isn't supposed to comment on manufacturers products of course but we were friends after 3 or 4 hours. He said that his company worked on 4 products as a contractor doing repairs. They were Apple, HP, IBM-Lenovo and Dell. He had 30 years experience and really impressed me with his knowledge of hardware and engineering.

He told me that the motherboard issue was a known issue with the XPS M1330 and he showed me exactly what it was. The Nvidia video card is placed on the board in a way that it doesn't receive sufficient cooling, and it invariably overheats. It was definitely a design error from day 1. Whether Dell made the motherboard or not I do not know. But what we agreed on was that it was a very cheap product ( the motherboard ) that didn't belong in a $2,000 list price computer. He even pointed out that the A/C adaptor was defective ( this is another known issue ) but Dell would hardly ever admit it. He went over and above and called Dell service ( as a tech on a special line ) and is getting them to send me a new adaptor. They should have done this anyway but of course unless someone gets lucky like me and encounters an honest person like this tech, Dell will screw them!

Finally, he pointed out something about "cold solders " on the motherboard where the battery mates with the motherboard to charge. He pointed out that these had gone bad and said that is why my battery that been at about 85% effectiveness had suddenly died. He even tried to get me a replacement battery from Dell but they refused and said that batteries are only warrantied for a year. I've had the computer 13 months!

Think about it. The Dell people know of this issue with the motherboard ruining batteries if he knew about it. And it's obvious that the motherboard ruined the battery but Dell holds to the script and F..cks people. It really is reprehensible. This tech had 30 years in the business and he remembers when Dell started in Austin with Michael Dell at the helm and they had vision and drive. He said they were very good back then. How things have changed.

We were friendly by now and I asked him to rate the computers he works on. He said that without a doubt Apple was superior by far ( of course you have to like Apple and be willing to pay a premium price ), IBM-Lenovo was second, HP was 3rd, and far, far behind was Dell. He deals internally with the service departments of all 4 makers and he said Dell is notorious for being uniformly awful. That is now. Sadly years ago he said they were fine ( when Michael Dell cared!).

Interestingly enough we talked more about computers. He said that Toshiba makes a quality product and that for a cost benefit purchase, Acer is wonderful. He stayed 3 hours and truly went over and above. He even flashed my BIOS and made some other improvements which he most certainly did not have to do.

So to make an endless story brief, I'll just say:

Dell is a Piece of Shit!

Their service is notably awful!

Please don't buy this garbage!
post #73 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by rnoldh View Post
So, what does this have to do with the problem being a hardware issue or a user problem? If every single computer maker used the exact same parts and there was an inherent motherboard issue, then it would be a hardware design issue and have nothing to do with the user. To me a user caused problem would be too much bloatware, not scanning for viruses or malware, or improper shutdowns. Things like that. Do you not agree?



Agreed.
post #74 of 123
I am not in the market for a new computer, but out of curiosity I checked the Lenovo site. The machines seem rather weak -- as in underpowered -- and they lack the range of customization and upgrade options that Dell offers.
post #75 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by whiteslashasian View Post
1997 P4? Something is not right there. You're probably thinking beginning of the millennium.

Back when I was 14 I built an AMD Athlon 1.4ghz T-Bird with a GeForce2 GTS to power Counter Strike. I've been building ever since. It's by far the best way to get good value for money when you start venturing into higher end components.


Yeah I might be a bit off. I remember graduating from school and buying (another) Dell, to replace my 486DX4/100 laptop. Maybe it was closer to 2000-1 or so, but that Dell lasted me until I got sick of the slow GeForce 2 series card and built my first system in 2005.
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