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Prince Of Wales check / plaid

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Seems abundant confusion regarding authentic POW check fabric hereabout.

From the Sotheby's auction several years ago of Eddy8's rigs.

POW check sport suit: jacket by Scholte, stalking trousers by Forster & Sons (1923)



(source: The Houndstooth Kid http://mrlapel.blogspot.com/2008/10/duke.html)
post #2 of 14
This thread appeared in the dark of night and then, it seems, disappeared before the sun came up and people started to ask all sorts of questions about hierarchies of quality and good sources for this and that.

But let's not let it founder. I think there is abundant confusion because the branches of the glen check tree are all criss-crossed and overburdened, some fruitless and some sterile. Maybe some pruning is in order, but the confusion is understandable. For some reason I have a belief (not clearly founded) that the purist expression of the glen check is a sturdy flannel with a large scale pattern in cream and black with a dark red windowpane. Don't know why I believe this to be true; it's all lost in the fog of old crumbling posts.

Anyway, it would be much appreciated if s.one could bring some order to this confusion. I don't want a neat little package (things don't work that way), but a roadmap would be nice.
post #3 of 14


"The Prince of Wales, one of the most handsome of the District Checks, owes its name to that of the heir to the British Crown. It follows the lines of the Small Glen Urquhart in that the two and two section is stripe down and stripe across on alternate blacks. Carried out on a red-brown and white ground the four and four section of the glen is boxed in with six ends on either side of navy blue. This pattern assumed fashion importance with the succession of Edward."

- Mr. John McKay, American Fabrics magazine, 1949
post #4 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post


"The Prince of Wales, one of the most handsome of the District Checks, owes its name to that of the heir to the British Crown. It follows the lines of the Small Glen Urquhart in that the two and two section is stripe down and stripe across on alternate blacks. Carried out on a red-brown and white ground the four and four section of the glen is boxed in with six ends on either side of navy blue. This pattern assumed fashion importance with the succession of Edward."

- Mr. John McKay, American Fabrics magazine, 1949

So this is the primordial ooze? Makes a certain sense because brown is so much more country than black. Otoh, 1949 might be a little late in the game. Not that I would pick a fight with Mr. John McKay.
post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 
The check in Post 1 appears to be alternating sett (weave) boxes of 4 ends of russet brown - then the next box consists of ends of Royal blue, russet, russet, Royal blue. The alternating box motif is the same vertically and horizontally. The ground colors appear to be cream and russet. From a distance the cloth appears an Autumnal foliage collage. The estate check colouration is functional*, not a boulevardier's decorative costume.

(I've recently posted, twice, a photo of the original Glenurquhart Estate Check elsewhere on this venue. Most participants are too busy imitating hostesses of ABC-TV's "The View" to pay any attention. Seed on hard ground.)

By contrast, Mr. Sartoria's illustration, from a vintagewear web site which hosts illustrations of dubious colourations, illustrates non-alternating boxes of 7 "ends"; black, wine, wine, wine, wine, black. Apparently a cream and wine ground.

Mr. Fox's wardrobe may be of interest, the soap opera less so, new to your door for less than $8 from an Amazon Market seller http://www.amazon.com/Edward-Mrs-Sim.../dp/B000742G06

*http://www.deerstalkingscotland.co.u...ngseasons.html

Find Eddy8
post #6 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by I. Gentantithesis View Post
(I've recently posted, twice, a photo of the original Glenurquhart Estate Check elsewhere on this venue. Most participants are too busy imitating hostesses of ABC-TV's "The View" to pay any attention. Seed on hard ground.)




- B
post #7 of 14
I like the Johnston's entry (think it's fantastic, actually) and the various ways it's made up in the picture above.

But I'm not interested in the one true cloth (mostly because I don't believe in the concept). I would suggest approaching the Glen Urquhart the same way a food scholar would approach a venerable old dish. Can it be made without the rascasse? What about the addition of tomatoes? In the instant case I wonder: Does it need to be flannel? Must it have an overcheck? How large should the scale be? What are the features everybody agrees are essential (even if they can s.times be ignored)?

There are a lot of insipid versions out there and I would love to find a conceptual framework to give them the boot.
post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post


"The Prince of Wales, one of the most handsome of the District Checks, owes its name to that of the heir to the British Crown. It follows the lines of the Small Glen Urquhart in that the two and two section is stripe down and stripe across on alternate blacks. Carried out on a red-brown and white ground the four and four section of the glen is boxed in with six ends on either side of navy blue. This pattern assumed fashion importance with the succession of Edward."

- Mr. John McKay, American Fabrics magazine, 1949

Plz sticky this along with a definitive answer on why you can't add vents to a suit.

/issue.
post #9 of 14
Thought I'd add my question here. Does anyone know of a navy glen plaid in flannel?

Something like these, but in navy instead of gray:



post #10 of 14
^ Minnis 0340, picture here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/british...7624496084105/
post #11 of 14
Thanks, Roger. I should have been clearer, I wondered if there was a flannel glen plaid with blue checks on a white ground vs. black/gray checks on white.

I found this photo, not sure of the cloth but I think it's linen:
post #12 of 14
Ooo--a large scale navy/white PoW in flannel would be lovely indeed...
post #13 of 14
I remember reading somewhere that Fox Flannel - apart from making gorgeous stuff, also have relatively small minimum quantities for special runs. Perhaps you could organize your own Cloth Club-alike here?
post #14 of 14
The London Lounge is now offering a blue fabric in this pattern which Parker might be interested in.
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