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Classical and Jazz Music Suggestions? - Page 2

post #16 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing
Nicolo Paganini's Caprices played by Rabin.

Good call.

koji
post #17 of 68
For classical, I'd start with a broad survey of stuff, and then narrow down on your favorite period or style or ensemble. Here's a very abbreviated, very personal list, slanted towards things that are very popular and in decent sound, so it will leave many things out:

Baroque: Bach: Brandenburg concerti (La Stravaganza), various piano pieces (Goldberg Variations, Well-Tempered Clavier, etc. Glenn Gould is my favorite), Mass in B minor (Gardiner). Vivaldi: Four Seasons: overplayed, but essential for you to know. I like Biondi's earlier recording, but either one of his is fine.

Classical: Mozart: various opera overtures (Marriage of Figaro, Magic Flute, Escape from the Seraglio). No favorites, but Gardiner or Marriner are safe choices. His piano concerti (try No. 21 whose middle movement you will surely recognize) and piano sonatas are also fun (avoid Gould unless you're into freak shows). Haydn: cello concerti. I like Wispelwey on Channel Classics. I'm not a big fan of this period, so maybe someone can suggest more stuff.

Romantic: Beethoven: all his symphonies, but I'd start with 5. 9's last movement is very recognizable. Everyone has their favorite. Try Gardiner or Zinman for more progressive readings, or Karajan 1963 for a more conventional approach. All his piano concerti, but I'm partial to 1, 2, and 4. I like Gould's 1 and 2, especially for the crazy cadenza he made for 1. Vogt/Rattle offer a modern recording of that cadenza. His piano sonatas are also very fine. There are lots of good recordings out there. The Naxos recordings aren't too bad, and are really cheap. I also like Gardiner's Missa Solemnis.

Brahms is another important Romantic. I really like his Intermezzi, which are these very personal, introspective piano pieces he wrote. Radu Lupu is a good start here. I'm not a big fan of his symphonic output, so someone else will have to help you out here.

In the same time period, but straddling the Romantic/Classical period a bit is Mendelssohn. I'd start with his Octet and his incidental music to A Midsummer Night's Dream, and maybe his Italian Symphony (no. 4). There are many multi-CD sets with pair all of these together. Kubelik's is one my favorites, but Mackerras is also very good.

I'll leave Chopin to the pianophiles. Very important, very beautiful music, but I can never keep their numbers and names straight.

Mahler is another important composer, but it may be too much for people new to classical music, because his works are all mostly very long. But they have this huge, epic, movie-like scope where he tries to bring every aspect of life into his music. It's big, melodramatic, and has to be played all out to make any sense. I'd start with his various songs like the Wayfarer Songs or the Ruckert Lieder. I like the Telarc recordings with Lopez-Cobos and Schmidt. Thomas Hampson is always a safe choice for lieder. If you want to start with his symphonies, I'd recommend 1 or 4, then maybe 2, 5, 3, 8, 9, 6, and 7, but some people find different ways into the music, and they are all worth hearing many times. Michael Tilson Thomas and the San Francisco Symphony are almost always safe choices, as is Bernstein, but Mahler fans argue over things like this, as both MTT and Bernstein represent the Dionysian branch of Mahler interpretation, and some people prefer the Apollonian side of stuff (Bertini, Horenstein, etc.).

Tchaikovsky writes very dramatic, sometimes overwrought, music. I like all his ballet music and symphonies. MTT and the SFSO have a DVD where they break down the performance of the 4th symphony that would be a great thing for someone new to classical music, along with an actual (very fine) performance of the symphony itself.

Some of the 20th century people you should know include Stravinsky (Rite of Spring, Petrushka, Firebird, his violin concerto, Agon, Symphony in C are some of his interesting stuff), Prokoviev (symphony no. 5, piano sonatas like no. 7, his ballet music like Romeo and Juliet as well as his violin concerti).

If you want to hear where movie music came from, start with Mahler and Tchaikovsky, and then go to Korngold. His violin concerto is like a little prototype for today's movie music.

There are lots of people I haven't mentioned, like Ravel, Debussy, Shostakovich, but this post is pretty darn long already. Try some of the suggestions out, let us know what you like, and we can narrow it down.

--Andre
post #18 of 68
I'd also recommend the Brandenburg concertos, and any of Bach's work really. Maybe you'll just appreciate it in a sort of mathematical/architectural way, or maybe it will change your conception of what art can be.

If I could only listen to music by one artist for the rest of my life, it would have to be Bach. Swear to God man, it'll make you a neo-Platonist.
post #19 of 68
Since you're at university now, try to find the listening list for a music survey course. Usually with the textbooks are packaged a CD set that ranges from medieval music to contemporary classical and jazz. Listen by Tomlinson and Kernan would be my recommendation for a general inway into Western music. Music: An Appreciation by Kernian is another common starter but I think the former is better written and has a better music set.
post #20 of 68
Thread Starter 
Andre,

All I can say is wow! That list will keep me busy for a while.

whoopee,

I'll look into that on the School of the Arts' website at my university.


------------------------------------------------------------------

Man, I've been so busy these past few weeks with what seems like a million exams and senior projects. Listening to some of these suggestions sure mellows me out and keeps me sane while working!
post #21 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andre Yew
For classical, I'd start with a broad survey of stuff, and then narrow down on your favorite period or style or ensemble. Here's a very abbreviated, very personal list, slanted towards things that are very popular and in decent sound, so it will leave many things out:

Baroque: Bach: Brandenburg concerti (La Stravaganza), various piano pieces (Goldberg Variations, Well-Tempered Clavier, etc. Glenn Gould is my favorite), Mass in B minor (Gardiner). Vivaldi: Four Seasons: overplayed, but essential for you to know. I like Biondi's earlier recording, but either one of his is fine.

Classical: Mozart: various opera overtures (Marriage of Figaro, Magic Flute, Escape from the Seraglio). No favorites, but Gardiner or Marriner are safe choices. His piano concerti (try No. 21 whose middle movement you will surely recognize) and piano sonatas are also fun (avoid Gould unless you're into freak shows). Haydn: cello concerti. I like Wispelwey on Channel Classics. I'm not a big fan of this period, so maybe someone can suggest more stuff.

Romantic: Beethoven: all his symphonies, but I'd start with 5. 9's last movement is very recognizable. Everyone has their favorite. Try Gardiner or Zinman for more progressive readings, or Karajan 1963 for a more conventional approach. All his piano concerti, but I'm partial to 1, 2, and 4. I like Gould's 1 and 2, especially for the crazy cadenza he made for 1. Vogt/Rattle offer a modern recording of that cadenza. His piano sonatas are also very fine. There are lots of good recordings out there. The Naxos recordings aren't too bad, and are really cheap. I also like Gardiner's Missa Solemnis.

Brahms is another important Romantic. I really like his Intermezzi, which are these very personal, introspective piano pieces he wrote. Radu Lupu is a good start here. I'm not a big fan of his symphonic output, so someone else will have to help you out here.

In the same time period, but straddling the Romantic/Classical period a bit is Mendelssohn. I'd start with his Octet and his incidental music to A Midsummer Night's Dream, and maybe his Italian Symphony (no. 4). There are many multi-CD sets with pair all of these together. Kubelik's is one my favorites, but Mackerras is also very good.

I'll leave Chopin to the pianophiles. Very important, very beautiful music, but I can never keep their numbers and names straight.

Mahler is another important composer, but it may be too much for people new to classical music, because his works are all mostly very long. But they have this huge, epic, movie-like scope where he tries to bring every aspect of life into his music. It's big, melodramatic, and has to be played all out to make any sense. I'd start with his various songs like the Wayfarer Songs or the Ruckert Lieder. I like the Telarc recordings with Lopez-Cobos and Schmidt. Thomas Hampson is always a safe choice for lieder. If you want to start with his symphonies, I'd recommend 1 or 4, then maybe 2, 5, 3, 8, 9, 6, and 7, but some people find different ways into the music, and they are all worth hearing many times. Michael Tilson Thomas and the San Francisco Symphony are almost always safe choices, as is Bernstein, but Mahler fans argue over things like this, as both MTT and Bernstein represent the Dionysian branch of Mahler interpretation, and some people prefer the Apollonian side of stuff (Bertini, Horenstein, etc.).

Tchaikovsky writes very dramatic, sometimes overwrought, music. I like all his ballet music and symphonies. MTT and the SFSO have a DVD where they break down the performance of the 4th symphony that would be a great thing for someone new to classical music, along with an actual (very fine) performance of the symphony itself.

Some of the 20th century people you should know include Stravinsky (Rite of Spring, Petrushka, Firebird, his violin concerto, Agon, Symphony in C are some of his interesting stuff), Prokoviev (symphony no. 5, piano sonatas like no. 7, his ballet music like Romeo and Juliet as well as his violin concerti).

If you want to hear where movie music came from, start with Mahler and Tchaikovsky, and then go to Korngold. His violin concerto is like a little prototype for today's movie music.

There are lots of people I haven't mentioned, like Ravel, Debussy, Shostakovich, but this post is pretty darn long already. Try some of the suggestions out, let us know what you like, and we can narrow it down.

--Andre


Glad to see two other John Eliot Gardiner fans here.

As for the Brahms symphonies, there is a wealth of choices.

I would take Bruno Walter/Columbia SO in 1
Furtwanger on EMI for 2 and 3
Walter/CSO for 4 (or Kleiber)

Good 1s and 4s are common, but no one comes close to the 3 of Furtwangler.

The above are all mid-or low-price CDs.
post #22 of 68
Somewhat "classical" I just downloaded DJ Spooky that has Satie re mixed, its awesome.
On a side note from Jazz / Classical, you ever try Delta Blues? It's pretty spare but some of the old bottleneck guitar stuff is great! I'll throw names your way if your interested.
post #23 of 68
Personally: Beethoven: 3rd Symphony, 5th Piano Concerto, all the Piano Sonatas, although the late ones are harder to understand (musically). Mendelssohn: Violin Concerto and Octet. Wagner: Avoid until you are classically mature. There is a completely different type of appreciation when you understand his music from a classical-music point of view than from a non-classical music point of view. (Sorry, it’s hard to put into the right words) Best advice I think I can give is to take it easy. No rush; there are WAY TOO many pieces of music out there to dive into quickly. It has taken me 10 years of seriously listening to music to realize I haven’t really heard that much. For 20th century composers: Copland: Appalachian Spring Gershwin: Rhapsody in Blue Jon.
post #24 of 68
Let's see if I can learn how to use this digital camera to show you all a little jazz, on black gold no less:


post #25 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by imageWIS
Personally:

Beethoven:

3rd Symphony, 5th Piano Concerto, all the Piano Sonatas, although the late ones are harder to understand (musically).

Mendelssohn:

Violin Concerto and Octet.

Wagner:

Avoid until you are classically mature. There is a completely different type of appreciation when you understand his music from a classical-music point of view than from a non-classical music point of view. (Sorry, it's hard to put into the right words)

Best advice I think I can give is to take it easy. No rush; there are WAY TOO many pieces of music out there to dive into quickly. It has taken me 10 years of seriously listening to music to realize I haven't really heard that much.

For 20th century composers:

Copland: Appalachian Spring

Gershwin: Rhapsody in Blue

Jon.


Okay Jon, here are 5 of my favorite Appalachian Spring recordings (plus a pair of my favorite shoes):

post #26 of 68
some faves from my personal collection while avoiding albums that have been mentioned already: Miles Davis - Cookin' at the Plugged Nickel (a live set with Miles' second great group...Carter, Shorter, Williams, Hancock) John Coltrane - some would say Giant Steps but i prefer Blue Train John Coltrane - A Love Supreme (hold off on the other Impulse albums though until you're thoroughly schooled in Coltrane...they're amazingly difficult listens) Sun Ra - Jazz in Silhouette (freakin' amazing) Grant Green - Solid Hank Mobley - A Slice of the Top Charles Mingus - Charles Mingus Presents Charles Mingus (this *IS* punk rock) Oliver Nelson - The Blues and the Abstract Truth Lou Rawls with Les McCann - Stormy Monday (jazz with a little bit of soul) Mora's Modern Rhythmists - Mr. Rhythmist Goes to Town (hot jazz from the 20s/30s played by a modern day band) oh shoot...Mr. Checks post made me remember: Sonny Rollins - Saxophone Colossus my only classical recommendation: Steve Reich - Music for 18 Musicians (you'll either find it in the classical or experimental section) enjoy. sounds like you're on a fun ride. -Jeff
post #27 of 68
Shameless plug, but if you click on the link in my sig, you'll be able to download many free piano recordings from a variety of composers.

koji
post #28 of 68
You should also check out Keith Jarrett, another jazz/classical pianist.
post #29 of 68
Coltrane Bye Bye Blackbird no lights
post #30 of 68
I like the Black Saint & the Sinner Lady.
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