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Good Suggestion for a First Handgun - Page 2

post #16 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Huntsman
<Laughs> Actually, MA is a tough state, but I'm pretty sure you can posess a transferrable CIII MP-5, provided Federal and State laws and licensing procedures are followed. Also you need like $20k. Of course, IANAL, Huntsman
for home defense, you say? imo nothing protects more (of course furniture damage could be a bitch) than a semiautomatic shotgun... Benelli 'Nova' tactical shotgun with Aimpoint red-dot sight and extended magazine
post #17 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by acidicboy
for home defense, you say? imo nothing protects more (of course furniture damage could be a bitch) than a semiautomatic shotgun...


Benelli 'Nova' tactical shotgun with Aimpoint red-dot sight and extended magazine

Then again, shotguns aren't very good for lose quarters defense. Too much leverage.
post #18 of 76
Might as well go all out at that point - Rhodesian firepower !
http://world.guns.ru/shotgun/SH09-E.HTM
post #19 of 76
ahem!!!!

as much as I love you all - lets have a little reality check.

in the history of mankind, nobody has ever bought too little gun for their first firearm.

save the revolving shotguns (as cool as they may be) for after you feel comfortable with something a little easier to use.
post #20 of 76
I don't think they're serious, globe. Anyway, I think J's suggestion of a 22/45 is a good one. Might consider a P22 for largely the same reasons. If money's an issue, you may be better served by only getting one gun and learning on that, in which case a solid polymer 9x19mm might be the way to go (Sig P2009, maybe). I've never touched a gun, so my practical advice here is, well, limited.
post #21 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by globetrotter
ahem!!!!

as much as I love you all - lets have a little reality check.

in the history of mankind, nobody has ever bought too little gun for their first firearm.

save the revolving shotguns (as cool as they may be) for after you feel comfortable with something a little easier to use.

I second this, as I think Augusto86 was asking a serious question. Let's aim him in the right direction!
post #22 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by globetrotter
ahem!!!! as much as I love you all - lets have a little reality check. in the history of mankind, nobody has ever bought too little gun for their first firearm. save the revolving shotguns (as cool as they may be) for after you feel comfortable with something a little easier to use.
I kid, I kid! I doubt anyone has ever seen one of those in the flesh anyway You know where I stand an all this stuff anyhow, Zach. You know it may be a good idea to go to a local shooting/gun club, see if you can look at what people are using/recommend (never been to one but I think they would be able to ). I assume they would be able to point you in the right direction and see what the aforementioned firearms look like. Well, minus the Rhodesian special above of course
post #23 of 76
I'd recommend purchasing a .22 first to simply learn the basics of shooting, cleaning, and how the gun works. Revolvers are really simple, but semi-autos are also nice. If you like shooting the .22, and I was in your position, I'd probably get one of these as a next step: Taurus PT92 9mm semi-auto. Nice solid gun.
post #24 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by skalogre
I doubt anyone has ever seen one of those in the flesh anyway
I wouldn't be too sure...
Quote:
Originally Posted by globetrotter
in the history of mankind, nobody has ever bought too little gun for their first firearm.
This is very true (well, perhaps pardoning the 2.7mm Colibri!!), and a corollary can be developed. The biggest mistake people make in choosing which first firearm to buy is getting too much gun. Further, see if you have an indoor rifle/pistol range in your area. They typically will have a variety of rentals to try, so you can get a feel of things, and will provide critical instuctions to first timers. Because many of these questions are far too subjective -- there's lots of props here for the polymer-frame guns, the Glocks and Sigs, which is deserved, but they have an entirely different feel from a solid-frame auto like the Taurus VM posted, or its progenitor, the Beretta 92, and this needs to be experienced. I still say .22, though. Regards, Huntsman Edited for clarity
post #25 of 76
I don't suggest the Glock as a first gun. IME it's pretty inconsistent accuracy-wise from the first shot to the last in a magazine (as the gun empties out and gets a pound lighter, all from the grip) and it can be somewhat discouraging for that. Also, being lightweight it flips around a lot on an inexperienced shooter and could lead to a flinching habit, and they can jam if your grip isn't great, etc.
post #26 of 76
I agree with everyone who suggested a .22 to start. If fact, if you get it in a revolver all the better. Once you've learned the fundamentals of good shooting and have the four rules of firearms safety drilled into your brain and become second nature, then start looking at other handguns. Most ranges will have instructional classes and guns you can rent at the range. Take advantage of those services.
post #27 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by j
I don't suggest the Glock as a first gun. IME it's pretty inconsistent accuracy-wise from the first shot to the last in a magazine (as the gun empties out and gets a pound lighter, all from the grip) and it can be somewhat discouraging for that. Also, being lightweight it flips around a lot on an inexperienced shooter and could lead to a flinching habit, and they can jam if your grip isn't great, etc.

I didn't have much of a choice, as it was the weapon issued to me. I had never fired a gun prior to being trained on the Glock. Subsequently, I used the Sig and have also fired a Beretta 92. All of my handgun experience is on 9mm, so I have nothing else by which I can compare. (I never claimed to be a well-rounded shooter!)

That said, I also have also used a Remington 870. That thing kicked!
post #28 of 76
I'd go with a .22 as well, but autoloader instead of a revolver. For me, an autoloader always had a better weight balance then a revolver, which made it "point" easier.
post #29 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mute
I agree with everyone who suggested a .22 to start. If fact, if you get it in a revolver all the better. Once you've learned the fundamentals of good shooting and have the four rules of firearms safety drilled into your brain and become second nature, then start looking at other handguns. Most ranges will have instructional classes and guns you can rent at the range. Take advantage of those services.

I agree with this recommendation. A revolver is about as idiot-proof as a gun can get, and a good choice for beginners. A friend of mine works part-time at a gun store (so he can get discounts) and told me a few months back that the Ruger Single Six model was flying off the shelves. People love em.

Personally, I learned on an SP101 with .38 spec., so really...you can start with anything. I probably should have started a bit easier though.
post #30 of 76
My first gun was a S&W .357, but I'd say a .38 revolver is a great first gun. You can keep it loaded for home protection without worrying about the clip spring getting un-springy from being kept loaded. The trigger has a harder pull so you're less likely to accidentally set it off, assuming you forgot to set the safety on a semi-auto. For practical home-defense purposes, you can't beat a good stainless revolver, and it's much easier to clean.

But if it's for range shooting, it's always fun to have a few guns to shoot with and I would agree a semi-auto will be a more fun gun to shoot. I would say go with one of the best right off the bat and get a Sig Sauer 9 or .40, if your intent is target shooting.
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