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Transparent Moderation Log & Site Topics - Part I - Page 626  

post #9376 of 9842
Quote:
Originally Posted by hossoso View Post
I wouldn't push it, he is a good friend of j's in real life. They're really cute together.

ya, they snuggle when it's cold....
post #9377 of 9842
Quote:
Originally Posted by hossoso View Post
I wouldn't push it, he is a good friend of j's in real life. They're really cute together.

I heard that sometimes j French braids TS' hair.

K
post #9378 of 9842
Quote:
Originally Posted by VKK3450 View Post
I heard that sometimes j French braids TS' hair.

K
ya, but any time Slim tries to touch J's hair, he gets hit with a pillow.
post #9379 of 9842
Quote:
Originally Posted by VKK3450 View Post
I heard that sometimes j French braids TS' hair.

K

Obviously, but that's only because j drinks and TS abstains.
post #9380 of 9842
HWS is real, he is not a sock puppet and he is legitimately a foreigner. He is also funny if you don't read his threaks like you read The Economist.
post #9381 of 9842
How do you know so much about Hot Walrus Sack?
post #9382 of 9842
Where can I find the Relationship Break Up thread? I can't seem to find it....
post #9383 of 9842
Quote:
Originally Posted by edmorel View Post
HWS is real, he is not a sock puppet and he is legitimately a foreigner. He is also funny if you don't read his threaks like you read The Economist.

I was thinking about this when I was running and concluded that he's most likely foreign. A few things came to mind:

He always says 'lip the pussy', which makes no sense in any other language because licking is always assumed to come from the tongue and not the lips. The only single word I can think of that involves both the lips and the act of licking (via the tongue) are the reflexive verbs that translate as 'to lick one's lips'. Unless hws were a poster with a lot of linguistics training to adequately hide a morphological mistake as phonetic (why go through all the trouble?), he is most likely a legitimate foreigner confusing 'lip' and 'lick' with each other because of their similar connection to the human face as well as the the plosive consonants on the end of each word being phonetically similar (unvoiced plosives only separated by a small difference in the location of the articulators -- coincidentally, the lips and tongue). A foreigner trying to learn these words most likely originally would hear them in speech and try to phonetically transcribe them (confusing the K in 'lick' with the P in 'lip'), whereas someone who isn't exposed to the words in speech would almost always get the phrasing correct since 'lick' translates quite literally across all Indo-European languages due to a common etymological root (leigh-*).

Less complicated than the above is the translation of his prepositions. When I asked if he lived in Switzerland (the country where he'd most likely hear German, French, and Italian which he commonly uses words and phrasing from in his English), he said 'I live close of Alps'. He's using the preposition 'a' which generally means 'to' unless it's referring to a location of origin in which case it best translates as 'of'. It's unlikely that somebody simply messing around with an online translator could replicate this common mistake unless he were specifically trying to make the mistake in the first place, which would presuppose knowledge of the intricacies of translation (meaning he had already learned both and was well-versed in them as well as their idiomatic differences -- unlikely).

What really threw me off was how he used 'Flugzeug' instead of 'airplane', which made no sense to me at all. The words are recent lexical entries and have no common phonetic or morphological root. They don't even come close to translating by cognative relationship, so why would he mistake one for the other? But this doesn't mean he's a sock puppet messing around with online translators, it simply means he is using translators. Given the two aforementioned examples (of which I'm sure there's more), this mistake can be indicative of nothing more than a mistake in itself; the phonological evidence in my first example seems to indicate that he's exposed to at least three foreign languages in his everyday life (which is why I guessed he was Swiss).
post #9384 of 9842
Quote:
Originally Posted by why View Post
I was thinking about this when I was running and concluded that he's most likely foreign. A few things came to mind:

He always says 'lip the pussy', which makes no sense in any other language because licking is always assumed to come from the tongue and not the lips. The only single word I can think of that involves both the lips and the act of licking (via the tongue) are the reflexive verbs that translate as 'to lick one's lips'. Unless hws were a poster with a lot of linguistics training to adequately hide a morphological mistake as phonetic (why go through all the trouble?), he is most likely a legitimate foreigner confusing 'lip' and 'lick' with each other because of their similar connection to the human face as well as the the plosive consonants on the end of each word being phonetically similar (unvoiced plosives only separated by a small difference in the location of the articulators -- coincidentally, the lips and tongue). A foreigner trying to learn these words most likely originally would hear them in speech and try to phonetically transcribe them (confusing the K in 'lick' with the P in 'lip'), whereas someone who isn't exposed to the words in speech would almost always get the phrasing correct since 'lick' translates quite literally across all Indo-European languages due to a common etymological root (leigh-*).

Less complicated than the above is the translation of his prepositions. When I asked if he lived in Switzerland (the country where he'd most likely hear German, French, and Italian which he commonly uses words and phrasing from in his English), he said 'I live close of Alps'. He's using the preposition 'a' which generally means 'to' unless it's referring to a location of origin in which case it best translates as 'of'. It's unlikely that somebody simply messing around with an online translator could replicate this common mistake unless he were specifically trying to make the mistake in the first place, which would presuppose knowledge of the intricacies of translation (meaning he had already learned both and was well-versed in them -- unlikely).

What really threw me off was how he used 'Flugzeug' instead of 'airplane', which made no sense to me at all. The words are recent lexical entries and have no common phonetic or morphological root. They don't even come close to translating, so why would he mistake one for the other? But this doesn't mean he's a sock puppet messing around with online translators, it simply means he is using online translators. Given the two aforementioned examples (of which I'm sure there's more), this mistake can be indicative of nothing more than a mistake in itself; the phonological evidence in my first example seems to indicate that he's exposed to at least three foreign languages in his everyday life (which is why I guessed he was Swiss).

I was just about to post this exact same thing!
post #9385 of 9842
Quote:
Originally Posted by why View Post
I was thinking about this when I was running and concluded that he's most likely foreign. A few things came to mind: He always says 'lip the pussy', which makes no sense in any other language because licking is always assumed to come from the tongue and not the lips. The only single word I can think of that involves both the lips and the act of licking (via the tongue) are the reflexive verbs that translate as 'to lick one's lips'. Unless hws were a poster with a lot of linguistics training to adequately hide a morphological mistake as phonetic (why go through all the trouble?), he is most likely a legitimate foreigner confusing 'lip' and 'lick' with each other because of their similar connection to the human face as well as the the plosive consonants on the end of each word being phonetically similar (unvoiced plosives only separated by a small difference in the location of the articulators -- coincidentally, the lips and tongue). A foreigner trying to learn these words most likely originally would hear them in speech and try to phonetically transcribe them (confusing the K in 'lick' with the P in 'lip'), whereas someone who isn't exposed to the words in speech would almost always get the phrasing correct since 'lick' translates quite literally across all Indo-European languages due to a common etymological root (leigh-*). Less complicated than the above is the translation of his prepositions. When I asked if he lived in Switzerland (the country where he'd most likely hear German, French, and Italian which he commonly uses words and phrasing from in his English), he said 'I live close of Alps'. He's using the preposition 'a' which generally means 'to' unless it's referring to a location of origin in which case it best translates as 'of'. It's unlikely that somebody simply messing around with an online translator could replicate this common mistake unless he were specifically trying to make the mistake in the first place, which would presuppose knowledge of the intricacies of translation (meaning he had already learned both and was well-versed in them as well as their idiomatic differences -- unlikely). What really threw me off was how he used 'Flugzeug' instead of 'airplane', which made no sense to me at all. The words are recent lexical entries and have no common phonetic or morphological root. They don't even come close to translating by cognative relationship, so why would he mistake one for the other? But this doesn't mean he's a sock puppet messing around with online translators, it simply means he is using translators. Given the two aforementioned examples (of which I'm sure there's more), this mistake can be indicative of nothing more than a mistake in itself; the phonological evidence in my first example seems to indicate that he's exposed to at least three foreign languages in his everyday life (which is why I guessed he was Swiss).
Poetry, obscure linguistic and discourse analysis, fine French cuisine.... SWOON! Anyway, I'm sticking to my story that he's a Romanian Gypsy with a satellite internet hookup in his caravan.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teacher View Post
After calling out Vaclav, I've given up pointing these things. Doesn't really seem to do any good.
I know. Us SLA folk are such wet blankets.
post #9386 of 9842
Quote:
Originally Posted by rach2jlc View Post
Poetry, obscure linguistic and discourse analysis, fine French cuisine.... SWOON!
Don't mind me, I am just taking notes in prevision of our future dinner date at the Eiffel Tower.
post #9387 of 9842
I guess what got lost among all my words was that hws is commonly exposed to separate spoken languages in his everyday life, which indicates he either lives in an isogloss most likely near Switzerland or he's a janitor at a university linguistics department. Well, at least that's what I'd bet on.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rach2jlc View Post
Poetry, obscure linguistic and discourse analysis, fine French cuisine.... SWOON!

I'm sure a linguistics professor is laughing at my elementary analysis while he's busy recreating mood and aspect in some ancient Semitic language or something.
post #9388 of 9842
Yeah, dude can barely speak english!

Quote:
Originally Posted by hws View Post
The WEF seems to be a collection of self-important people, like Bilderbergers. I do remember what Bono said a few years ago. It is somewhat ironic that intellectually pretentious organizations use people like Bono and Angelina Jolie to promote their agendas.

Quote:
Originally Posted by hws View Post
Golden Bale is not advertised to be a Super wool. Or at least I have never seen a "Super" Golden Bale fabric. 80s is the highest micron wool I have seen called a Super. Most wool-based fabrics I have seen not labeled Super, including "summer" and "winter" wool+mohair fabrics, are described as Super 90s, sometimes Super 100s, on export declaration forms. But the labels the weavers provide tailors for these same fabrics, which some sew into finished garments, make no mention of the word Super, just "wool and mohair," and variations of this.
post #9389 of 9842
hws = why
post #9390 of 9842
In August 2009 he goes between his trademark broken English and a much more fluent English.

I have stuff to do but I'll return to ponder more...as a professor once told me 'Careful with this stuff. It will make you crazy'.
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Styleforum › Forums › General › General Chat › Transparent Moderation Log & Site Topics - Part I