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HBO Documentary on the Garment industry - Page 2

post #16 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by columbia92 View Post
Isn't this the way it is for just about every industry for last 50 years or so?? Manufacturing jobs move oversea to cheaper wage nation. About 80% of all the consumder goods we buy these days are made in China and there is no turning back the trend...

There are lots of instances of high skill manufacturing staying in relatively high cost labor markets.
post #17 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by v0rtex View Post
A little more honest than the "Made in Italy" ones which really mean "Assembled in China then shipped to Italy to have the tag sewn in"...

I was in Australia a few months ago checking out a local store brand that specialize in selling shirts. They were selling "Egyptian Cotton Shirts" made in Shanghai. A month later, I was in Shanghai and happened to go into the factory that actually makes the shirts. The owner told me that the fabric are from Guandong province.

Another interesting thing I noticed... propercloth.com sells a lot of fabric that looks very similiar to the fabric that's on moderntailor.com. Propercloth claims their shirts are made in USA and they buy their fabric from Japan and Italy while modern tailor operate out of Shanghai.... Could it just be excuse to charge more money for the same product in the name of made in USA?
post #18 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by columbia92 View Post
I was in Australia a few months ago checking out a local store brand that specialize in selling shirts. They were selling "Egyptian Cotton Shirts" made in Shanghai. A month later, I was in Shanghai and happened to go into the factory that actually makes the shirts. The owner told me that the fabric are from Guandong province.

Egyptian cotton is grown in Egypt but not necessarily woven there...
post #19 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sanguis Mortuum View Post
Egyptian cotton is grown in Egypt but not necessarily woven there...

And if it's going to be machine made, the origin of the fabric is more important than the location of the machine doing the sewing. Made in China of Italian yarn is better than Made in Italy of Chinese yarn.
post #20 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montrachet View Post
And if it's going to be machine made, the origin of the fabric is more important than the location of the machine doing the sewing. Made in China of Italian yarn is better than Made in Italy of Chinese yarn.

Which assumes QC means nothing. Same mistake Ford made when the shifted production of some things to Mexico years ago. QC matters.
post #21 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by columbia92 View Post
The question is.... why do we want to continue to over pay and support jobs and industry that is no longer competitive globally?? Jobs have been lost oversea for the past 50 years but the unemployeement ratio has pretty much stayed the same except during this recession. It's more important to re-educate workers and put them in use in industries where US is still competitive....

Exactly... this is the transition from the industrial to information age. What we're experiencing is simply progression of society, it's not sad/unfortunate, it's simply the fact that as time marches on changes occur. It's only a loss for those who rest on their laurels.

Skilled artisans and their products will never disappear, it helps to think of those as something seperate - a luxury vs. a consumable.
post #22 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicola View Post
Which assumes QC means nothing. Same mistake Ford made when the shifted production of some things to Mexico years ago. QC matters.
So is that Ford's responsibility or is that Mexico's? Is it impossible for a product with impeccable QC to come from Mexico?
post #23 of 24
Thanks for the link to download the show. Very interesting. I guess it makes me feel better that I buy more expensive clothes, since most of my clothes are not made in third world contries.
post #24 of 24
I enjoyed the show and it was sad although I do not blame politicians or unions society has simply evolved. My family used to own clothing factories in New York, New Jersey and Connecticut but they are all gone. Even when we made clothes in the USA we also used overseas factories for both weaving cloth and making clothes. Factories in the USA have advantages for time to market for new fashions as well as sample making of course. As well as high tech production.
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