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Questions about "The Godfather" - Page 3

post #31 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClassyGuy1 View Post
Well, shit, this sucks. I actually thought I had someone on my side there for a second. So, I guess I stand corrected. I guess it's true what they say about this site....the "Style Forum Veterans" all stick together and usually give the cold shoulder to anyone on here that's new, because "newbies" aren't as fashion-savvy and they don't know anything about style, so "as far as we're concerned, they're not exactly welcome in our clique".

hahahahahahahahahahahahahahhahahahahahahahahahahahah





post #32 of 58
"When they come at you, they come at what you love most"
post #33 of 58
1) Sonny is killed because he is the one maintaining a war that none of the other four families wants, and that is costing them all a ton of money. They know that the war goes on only because the Don is out of comission and Sonny is running the family. They also know that Hagen and the capos oppose the war and would stop it if they could. So they get Sonny out of the way.

2) Luca is killed because Solozzo and the Tataglias (and Barzini) know at that point that they are going to kill the Don (or try) and once they do that, they fear that Luca will come after them, hard. Luca is the Corleones' most powerful weapon. They want him out of the way to make it harder for the Corleones to retaliate, and less likely.
post #34 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slopho View Post
You're not moving on to Godfather II until you pass Godfather I



Don't tell him about the oranges...!
post #35 of 58
BTW, RIP Johnny Fontaine
post #36 of 58
Great thread. Please post more questions and answers.

Here is one: I remember that the Vatican plotline in Godfather III is supposed to be based on something truthy. What was it?
Also, who thinks the gnocchi-making scene was vaguely hot?
post #37 of 58
The GIII plot is based on two historical events which may or may not have been connected.

The pope who succeeded Paul VI in 1978 lasted one month before he died. He was something of a reformer, which caused a number of people to assert that he had been poisoned by the Cardinals, who did not want him to change anything. The conspiracy theories grew after no autopsy was performed and doctors ruled that he had simply died of a heart attack.

The movie, however, implies that the pope was poisoned (no evidence of that) and also that the pope was a real crusading reformer, when in fact the real JP I was really not doing anything all that radical, though he had made noises about getting the Vatican's account books in order.

The second thread comes from a real scandal in the early '80s. The head of a corrupt Italian bank was found hanging from a bridge in London in 1982. People were tried for the murder years later, but acquitted. His bank was partially owned by the Vatican, and he had been the Vatican's main financier.

Calvi (the banker) was a crook and an embezzler, but connections to the death of JPI are very tenuous.

However, much as I tend to dismiss nearly all conspiracy theories, in Italy they are more likely to be true, and there may well be something to this one.
post #38 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by dopey View Post
Also, who thinks the gnocchi-making scene was vaguely hot?

do sicilians make gnocchi?
post #39 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by globetrotter View Post
do sicilians make gnocchi?

do sicilians hire george hamilton as their counsel?
post #40 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by somatoform View Post
And at the behest of common sense, I'm going to ask how the hell they got a horse's chopped off head into a bed without the director realizing it?

They killed Luca brasi because they didnt buy his story about being dissatisfied with the Corleone family. One more soldier out of the way.

I always thought Sonny was killed because he was predictable. They knew they could get him to go charging off without thinking and without protection.

Ive always wondered about the horse head. The way I explain it to myself so that there continues to be no flaws in one of my favorite movies is that the movie guy was a heavy drinker and was just pretty much passed out in bed.


I have a question.

Did Fredo know or suspect he was being taken out in the boat to be executed?
post #41 of 58
^ in the novel, they also portrayed Woltz as a pedophile who beds child actresses and/or his stars' daughters. the dvd's outtakes has a scene hinting at this too. I might be wrong, but I believe the night before he found the horse head Hagen saw a popular child actress being brought by her mother to Woltz' house. And judging by the fact that the novel and the movie picks up some real stories, I sure hope this wasn't done in "old Hollywood". also, if I may add: the premise of Vincent Mancini's existence is f'd up. in the novel, Lucy Mancini was getting fucked by a very very well-hung Sonny Corleone, but she was shipped out to Vegas to look over Fredo and eventually married a plastic surgeon. And yes, I'd like to believe Fredo knows. Whaddyathink would happen when you're stuck inside a boat with Al Neri? His expression when Connie called Anthony, and when he went through fishing ("let's go, Al") hints that he knows his fate. He could've just called off the whole thing altogether.
post #42 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by acidicboy View Post

And yes, I'd like to believe Fredo knows. Whaddyathink would happen when you're stuck inside a boat with Al Neri? His expression when Connie called Anthony, and when he went through fishing ("let's go, Al") hints that he knows his fate. He could've just called off the whole thing altogether.

+1
post #43 of 58
"I am Enzo... de baker. I stay. For your fadah. For your fadah"
post #44 of 58
Sorry to revive a three year old thread, but watching GF1 this evening. My GF is cracking up since I know almost every line before they say it. (>50 viewings)

In any event, one thing that never made sense to me. In the wedding scene, Tom Hagen states that no Sicilian can refuse a request on his daughters wedding day. My question is this - why didnt Solozzo ask the Don for his political protection on his daughters wedding day instead of a few weeks/months after? tounge.gif
post #45 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewYorkBuck View Post

Sorry to revive a three year old thread, but watching GF1 this evening. My GF is cracking up since I know almost every line before they say it. (>50 viewings)
In any event, one thing that never made sense to me. In the wedding scene, Tom Hagen states that no Sicilian can refuse a request on his daughters wedding day. My question is this - why didnt Solozzo ask the Don for his political protection on his daughters wedding day instead of a few weeks/months after? tounge.gif

Maybe he wasn't invited to the wedding.
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