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Thick and heavy Tweed roll call - Page 5

post #61 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by RSS View Post
What the hell does this mean?

You live in the Bay Area.

You tell us.


- B
post #62 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Ay329 View Post
Perhaps I'm NOW ready to join the Fedora Lounge with my original picture on this thread as my avatar

You're a good sport, M.


- B
post #63 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post
You live in the Bay Area.

You tell us.
I haven't a clue what it means ... perhaps you can tell me.

I live in Berkeley ... I am surrounded by women who like to hunt and fish. In fact, my neighbor, Mary Kay, uses my Purdey more than I do.
post #64 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by RSS View Post
I haven't a clue what it means ... perhaps you can tell me.

I live in Berkeley ... I am surrounded by women who like to hunt and fish. In fact, my neighbor, Mary Kay, uses my Purdey more than I do.

As you know, English trousers are not lined. A&S made pained faces when I once suggested lining tweed.
post #65 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by RSS View Post
I live in Berkeley ... I am surrounded by women who like to hunt and fish. In fact, my neighbor, Mary Kay, uses my Purdey more than I do.

To fish?

Alas, my Fabbri is only used on clays. Sometimes, in anger.


- B
post #66 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by Will View Post
As you know, English trousers are not lined. A&S made pained faces when I once suggested lining tweed.

How about lining a heavy tweed with a lighter faux tweed?

Those would be some sturdy office pants.


- B
post #67 of 128
Tweed is so much fun. I love this thread.
post #68 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by Will View Post
As you know, English trousers are not lined. A&S made pained faces when I once suggested lining tweed.
Yes, I remember the pained faces ... following many of my requests ... and sometimes after only the first word or two.

Edit: But still ... I don't quite comprehend the ghey reference. Ghey seems to be a term exclusive to the Internet. Will someone PM me and explain this term and it's use.
post #69 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post
To fish?
Yes, in a barrel.
post #70 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Ay329 View Post
Mafoofan and FNB, thanks for the comments Seeking a slender build on my massive and well fed frame is always the challenge for my tailor...but it is one of the reasons I do bespoke This was my first and possibly last ever experiment with overlap. I specifically asked for more open quarters, but my tailor opposed and fought it noting that it would look bad. So I went along. Traditionally I prefer a more open quarter design. FNB: I'll give you a double dose of Michael Alden's cloth marvels. Here is a better photo shot with an 8 megapixel camer of the Eden in Paris (top grey flannel with blue windowpane) and the Brown Tweed...
What I was saying has nothing to do with your build. The jacket isnt aesthetically pleasing. When a jacket is quirky, it had better be a "good" quirky. If your tailor wouldnt mke open quarters, then that's not good. Is his identity a secret? I think that with inherently different or country cloths, often a standard cut is the best policy. In any case, I think he might want to fix it because you look like you're wrapped in a Persian carpet. I can design better cloths myself and do. And, I supplement this with the many fine choices existent from real cloth merchants. Thus, I have no interest in this cloth club stuff.
post #71 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by Film Noir Buff View Post
What I was saying has nothing to do with your build. The jacket isnt aesthetically pleasing. When a jacket is quirky, it had better be a "good" quirky. If your tailor wouldnt mke open quarters, then that's not good. Is his identity a secret? I think that with inherently different or country cloths, often a standard cut is the best policy. In any case, I think he might want to fix it because you look like you're wrapped in a Persian carpet.

I can design better cloths myself and do. And, I supplement this with the many fine choices existent from real cloth merchants. Thus, I have no interest in this cloth club stuff.

I have to say that I agree with this. Michael Ay329 jacket is not a good look. The top part of the jacket looks a little big. Additionally, I am not a fan of the cloth. But if you like it then that's what counts.
post #72 of 128
Reading this thread, I wish I made my jacket in tweed instead.
Never again from a Bangkok tailor.

Question: What weight should I look for when making a jacket warm for spring and autumn and can be worn with a sweater in the winter?
post #73 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jerome View Post
Just wanted to ask if anyone still wears this sort of heavy thorn-proof etc. tweed that is so nicely unfit for any modern office, so impractical in modern society? Today it snowed/rained here (maybe had about 3-1°C, I'd say) and I wore only a shirt, a cashmere scarf and a heavy tweed jacket (+ trousers&shoes-gloves etc of course) and was quite comfortable when quickly hied myself to the bank and the local grocery store. It was some really ghastly weather today and I spent the rest of the day in deep solitary contemplation, reading and dedicating myself to my various studies, at home..

Share your tweed stories and adventures here if you'd be so kind!

What Ho! Sounds wonderful like an edition of The Chap.

Of course you natural layered outfit coped perfectly with the elements - just like our friend Mallory who conquered (?) Everest in similar clobber/kit purchased from a colonial outfitter of the day on the Strand.

The experts who have examined his clobber pronounced it perfect rather than all the synthetic modern crap that will not allow a chap's pores to breathe naturally.

Tally ho!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Ay329 View Post
I asked my tailor to make me a single breasted plain vest. No lapels. In the past I've made about 3 other double breasted vests and liked them...but they always require extra fittings

So my tailor didn't listen and made me a DB vest. Since I'm tall with a long torso...its usually 7 buttons and make the vest top opening really high to ensure it looks good

Enough cloth was left over to make a 2nd vest...just as I wanted, SB with no lapels, so I now have 2 vests and 2 trousers on this suit. I put the 8 meters to good work

The DB vest is actually a Notch lapel.


Now about that new mortgage squire...

Quote:
Originally Posted by vwdolly View Post
I have to say that i sell vast amounts of Harris tweed jackets, twist tweeds & thornproof suits etc . So it is as popular as ever i would say

In Oz it used to be huge as well but now they bring nothing even in the thrift shops. I have bought Harris, Donegal and vintage Harris for nothing...a great pity but a sign of the de-Anglicizing of Aussie society. The WASP stuff no longer is what is was...
Quote:
Originally Posted by I. Gentantithesis View Post
Original 24 oz. Seafield's Glenurquhart Estate tweed (1840) woven by Johnstons of Elgin.


Number 2 on the left is awesome.
post #74 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Ay329 View Post
Sorry to hijack this thread...but the below pics are more reflective of the type of vest that I like coupled with the type of open quarters that I can get my tailor to make. Cloth is a Dormeuil Royal 12 oz cloth.





Whnay, I didn't like the DB vest (I asked the tailor for a SB non-laple vest but instread he surprised me with a DB Notch lapel vest. My tailor is getting up there in years and goes off on tangents like the vest. Oh well, with the extra fabric I had left over, I made a single breasted non lapeled vest just like the pictures above. I am considering taking the tweed jacket back to see if more open quarters can be integrated.

Perhaps I'm NOW ready to join the Fedora Lounge with my original picture on this thread as my avatar

Is there something wrong with the top button area?
post #75 of 128
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by meister
What Ho! Sounds wonderful like an edition of The Chap. Of course you natural layered outfit coped perfectly with the elements - just like our friend Mallory who conquered (?) Everest in similar clobber/kit purchased from a colonial outfitter of the day on the Strand. The experts who have examined his clobber pronounced it perfect rather than all the synthetic modern crap that will not allow a chap's pores to breathe naturally. Tally ho!
Funny, I seem to be a mirror for your prejudice. That happens at times on the net: some guy who neither knows anything about you nor tries to will respond excitedly by the trigger of certain specific words respectively to a certain diction in a post and thereby will read whole imaginary worlds into some innocent little anecdote from your daily life. p.s. I don’t even know what The Chap isInterestingly enough, in my case I have to confess that I even do this multi-layered approach to language quite intentionally, at times: in my posts I use a variety of levels of speech, degrees of politeness and argots (even though English isn’t even my mother-tongue) because it is not only my job but also my passion to play around with language and see how people react to it.
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