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Suggested winter clothing for grad school in Boston? - Page 3

post #31 of 66
I don't think leather is as practical as something made from synthetic materials. Once they get wet (invariably, if you are outside a lot), they tend to dry up and crack (road salt contributes quite a bit to this). I have a pair from Arc'Teryx that has worked very well for several seasons. They're not at all cumbersome, unlike others on the market. I bought mine for about $25 from STP. I think they retail for about $40. Oh, about the balaclava, I own one too. Never once wore it. I feel like a criminal every time I put it on. It looks quite silly in Boston, actually.
post #32 of 66
Thread Starter 
Btw, to clarify, you guys (who've lived in Boston) seem to be saying that the winter boots are not necessary and Neos will do, but you may as well keep a pair handy in case you need to walk around the city in winter? And anything with Goretex below $100 is cheap enough for the purpose?
post #33 of 66
Try not to go bananas before you get there. See what the locals wear first, then dress yourself accordingly. You already have a local guide in LA Guy, take advantage of that. Last, but not least, find a nice woman to keep you warm and motivated.[/quote]


yeah, stick with the locals and definitely try to find a signifigant other before hibernation season..otherwise your grades are going to be waay too good for a doctorate student
post #34 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by josepidal
Btw, to clarify, you guys (who've lived in Boston) seem to be saying that the winter boots are not necessary and Neos will do, but you may as well keep a pair handy in case you need to walk around the city in winter? And anything with Goretex below $100 is cheap enough for the purpose?

Winter boots are definitely not necessary.

As far as gloves, you'll probably be fine with a $20 glove from Filenes, unless you're going skiing.
post #35 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by nomovement
...definitely try to find a signifigant other before hibernation season...
Very important information in a cold climate. Easily underestimated. (Or is that misunderestimated?)
post #36 of 66
I will give my argument for owning a pair of Sorel or Sorel-like boots:

Not only are they warm, they come a good 8" up your leg so you don't have to worry about deep snow, and most importantly, since so much salt is used in the NE in the winter, they will last you a couple winters, get caoted with all that crap and you can not worry about them because they don't cost that much.

Here's a pair at REI that only costs $100.

And my argument for the expedition-weight (or just heavy-weight) long underwear top is that it keeps you from having to wear too many layers.

Carry your shoes and change when you get to the office/class.

Do not go overboard Jose. I lived in NH two years and one was "the worst we had in 25 years" as many told me. The next was mild. But that bad winter was bad.


bob
post #37 of 66
Jose,
When you arrive, be sure to stop by and see our collections. If we do not have what you are looking for, the least I can do is be you guide to survival in New England. You'll have many opportunities to choose from.

Best Regards,

Gary
post #38 of 66
I would advise you wait before buying expedition-like underwear. If however you find you need long johns (but decide so only after experiencing the weather in MA for yourself), I would advise you buy something made by Icebreaker. This is a New Zealand company specialized in making different weights of merino wool underwear, which is much more comfortable than the synthetic junk Helly Hansen, Lowe Alpine or Patagonia make. Also, it doesn't start to smell and it it is very nice to the touch. It is a tad more expensive, but definitely worth it. (Appr. 60 Euros for long sleeve t-shirts and long johns in the 200g weight.) It should be available in better outdoor shops in the States. When I am in the Alps I wear their Skin 200 underwear and I like it a lot. At night I wear Haglofs polyamid underwear, because I have to let the Icebreaker stuff dry.
post #39 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdawson808
I will give my argument for owning a pair of Sorel or Sorel-like boots:

Not only are they warm, they come a good 8" up your leg so you don't have to worry about deep snow, and most importantly, since so much salt is used in the NE in the winter, they will last you a couple winters, get caoted with all that crap and you can not worry about them because they don't cost that much.

Here's a pair at REI that only costs $100.

In my experience the amount of times that it snows per year with any amount of accumulation can be counted on one hand. There will likely be a couple big blizzards per year and that's about it. You might not want to be wearing very nice shoes for that but anything with rubber soles should be fine.

Quote:
And my argument for the expedition-weight (or just heavy-weight) long underwear top is that it keeps you from having to wear too many layers.

Carry your shoes and change when you get to the office/class.

Do not go overboard Jose. I lived in NH two years and one was "the worst we had in 25 years" as many told me. The next was mild. But that bad winter was bad.


bob

Layers are good IMO. Try wintering in MSP or northern WI if you think a NH winter is bad...
post #40 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by drizzt3117
Try wintering in MSP or northern WI if you think a NH winter is bad...

I see your Northern WI and raise you a Northern Alberta.
post #41 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy
I see your Northern WI and raise you a Northern Alberta.

How do you define Northern Alberta? Edmonton? Grande Praire or Fort McMurray?
post #42 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by von Rothbart
How do you define Northern Alberta? Edmonton? Grande Praire or Fort McMurray?

North of Edmonton. I always think of Edmonton as the "final stop".

Now, for a depressing winter, I've heard bad things about Nunavut (sp? Can never spell that correctly). I never have, and don't really want to ever be forced to. Ughhhh... Except for the Northern Lights, I guess, which would be cool that far North. Still not worth it.
post #43 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy
North of Edmonton. I always think of Edmonton as the "final stop".

Now, for a depressing winter, I've heard bad things about Nunavut (sp? Can never spell that correctly). I never have, and don't really want to ever be forced to. Ughhhh... Except for the Northern Lights, I guess, which would be cool that far North. Still not worth it.

Heh when I lived in Vienna I met a girl from Edmonton. She was wearing a skirt and tanktop when it was like 50 degrees out and she thought it was 'balmy'
post #44 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by nomovement
...definitely try to find a signifigant other before hibernation season.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rdawson808
I will give my argument for owning a pair of Sorel or Sorel-like boots:

Not only are they warm, they come a good 8" up your leg so you don't have to worry about deep snow, and most importantly, since so much salt is used in the NE in the winter, they will last you a couple winters, get caoted with all that crap and you can not worry about them because they don't cost that much.

Here's a pair at REI that only costs $100.

And my argument for the expedition-weight (or just heavy-weight) long underwear top is that it keeps you from having to wear too many layers.

Carry your shoes and change when you get to the office/class.

Do not go overboard Jose. I lived in NH two years and one was "the worst we had in 25 years" as many told me. The next was mild. But that bad winter was bad.

bob

The only argument needed to counter any reason for wearing these is contained in the prior post by nomovement, which I heartily endorse. It's like musical chairs, once the snow hits the ground and the mercury dips below freezing, those who alone will be alone until the spring.

post #45 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by drizzt3117
Heh when I lived in Vienna I met a girl from Edmonton. She was wearing a skirt and tanktop when it was like 50 degrees out and she thought it was 'balmy'

Yep. Edmonton gets pretty cold in the winter. imho, 50-60 degrees is nearly perfect weather. You can wear a sweater or a sweatshirt, and a light jacket over that for fashion if you like, but you don't have to. It's cool enough that you can run a few blocks without breaking a sweat, but warm enough so that you can sit outside with a hot drink and not feel too cold. I like that.

As for Boston, you don't really need boots at all. It really doesn't snow very much here. Nearly nothing on the ground, even mid-winter. I broke mine out maybe twice last winter. Other than that, I wore sneakers (Chuck Taylors, $38) that were cheap and meant to be banged up, jus like in summer. Just wear thicker socks. And layering is key. I really like layering, so I actually look forward to Boston Octobers and Novembers (October is a near perfect month here.)
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