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What do you do if your tailor tells you you're fat? - Page 6

post #76 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by globetrotter View Post
sometimes you need to rap a guy on the nose for him to pay attention.



ok, I didn't want to pile on about the weight loss, but then I noticed that you are getting married.

after I got married, I put on something in the niehgborhood of 150 pounds over 10 years. now I am loosing them. it is a slow and painful process. be very careful - it will be very easy to stay in, sit on the couch and have some ice cream. it will creep up on you.

control it now or you will be sorry. good luck

one of the greatest hobbies i have. so sad.
post #77 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by sho'nuff View Post
one of the greatest hobbies i have. so sad.
I love how the dog avatar keeps getting smaller/more zoomed in.
post #78 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by j View Post
I love how the dog avatar keeps getting smaller/more zoomed in.

are you sure? it was always like that i think. it is not your imagination?
post #79 of 140
Traditionally, you post a leaving StyleForvm thread.

- B
post #80 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post
Traditionally, you post a leaving StyleForvm thread. - B
I don't think blacklplatano would appreciate this snark.
post #81 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Moo View Post
But does a tailor need to tell you this? Did mjHession ask the tailor if he was fat? You're paying them to make you look as good as you can at your current weight, and after they've finished they call you fat? This is acceptable in your book?

A tailor needs to be able to frankly advise a client with respect to his physique in order to discuss his best possible options. Every tailor I've worked with has mentioned that I'm short while explaining his ideas to me. I've never been offended. In fact, I'd be very worried otherwise.

There is a strong notion on the forum that a good tailor should obey his client's every whim and preference. In truth, a good tailor is like any other good professional: he must be free to apply his expertise, which may mean telling you things you don't want to hear.
post #82 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post
A tailor needs to be able to frankly advise a client with respect to his physique in order to discuss his best possible options. Every tailor I've worked with has mentioned that I'm short while explaining his ideas to me. I've never been offended. In fact, I'd be very worried otherwise. There is a strong notion on the forum that a good tailor should obey his client's every whim and preference. In truth, a good tailor is like any other good professional: he must be free to apply his expertise, which may mean telling you things you don't want to hear.
Matt, honestly, it's like your tailor saying "hey Matt, you're really fucking short" after he's done with you and has measured/pinned/fitted you. You're on your way out and he says "hey Matt, you're still short! Your clothing, the expensive ass shit you just bought? Yeah, that would look better if you were 6'2". Have a good one, bud!" Sure, saying "you could stand to lose a few pounds" while getting measured or showing you how a jacket can look if you lost some weight - while being measured, when it's appropriate to mention such things - is fine. But as you're leaving, as a parting word? This is OK?
post #83 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Moo View Post
Matt, honestly, it's like your tailor saying "hey Matt, you're really fucking short" after he's done with you and has measured/pinned/fitted you. You're on your way out and he says "hey Matt, you're still short! Your clothing, the expensive ass shit you just bought? Yeah, that would look better if you were 6'2". Have a good one, bud!"

Sure, saying "you could stand to lose a few pounds" while getting measured or showing you how a jacket can look if you lost some weight - while being measured, when it's appropriate to mention such things - is fine. But as you're leaving, as a parting word? This is OK?

The OP said that the tailor's daughter commented on his weight while he was in the store, further commenting as he was leaving. There is no indication that the comments were mean spirited. Moreover, they are relevant to what the OP was asking the tailor to do (make him a suit). When I was getting fit at Oxxford years ago, they advised me to slow down my orders and not get anything too slim because I am bound to gain weight and change body shape over the years. If a 24-year-old is significantly overweight, it makes perfect sense for a tailor to suggest he lose weight first. After all, it would be much easier just to take his money and deliver a product that won't last or look as good.
post #84 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by mjHession View Post
Update:

I called the tailor today, and spoke with him directly, He was at first very short with me, and told me to call back when his daughter came in. I think it is the norm for him to pass off smaller ordeals to her. After thinking for a bit I called back and told him that I was displeased that he wouldn't even hear my question and told him I was just going to come in and pick up my coat (it is a morning coat for my wedding needed to be let out and inch turns out there is no material to let out) and I said I would just pick up and get my other two coats while I was their if you don't want to work with me I'll jsut take my business elsewhere.

When I got there it was like I was in a whole different shop. The daughter approached me, I told her I was there to pick up my coat, she said i think dad wants to talk to you. He had me try on each jacket, spoke in detail to me about what adjustments could be made for each one, and what was probably worth doing and what was not. Then he had me try on the morning coat, gave me a few suggestions, 1 putting in a bigger lining and stretching the wool, 2 leaving the coat unbuttoned as that would probably look okay, 3 getting a piece of cloth from the manufacturer and adding a seam to the back or one to each side, I called the manufacturer and they have left over cloth from these coats, they are going to send me some free I just have t pay for shipping and he is going to make it fit right. Also the women remeasured the sleeves on the two coats i was leaving there and spent much greater time and effort in getting them right, asking me what I thought each time, and making slight adjustments a few times till they were right spot on.

Very satisfied now. Not sure if I hit a bad day, or what but I am super satisfied now.

Note: I am working on loosing weight, but since I already have a future wife it's not the biggest concern of mine. Slow and steady. Again maybe the AT will knock off a few inches, we'll see next summer.
I am starting to think you look for reasons to get offended about your weight and make it into a cause célèbre. Sure I think I know it is your problem but you sound like you also want to make it other people's problem as well.

I have no idea why they changed their attitude, if they really did, but I could see it just as much as they do not want to be accused of discrimination from so overly sensitive clod as any other reason.
post #85 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post
The OP said that the tailor's daughter commented on his weight while he was in the store, further commenting as he was leaving. There is no indication that the comments were mean spirited. Moreover, they are relevant to what the OP was asking the tailor to do (make him a suit). When I was getting fit at Oxxford years ago, they advised me to slow down my orders and not get anything too slim because I am bound to gain weight and change body shape over the years. If a 24-year-old is significantly overweight, it makes perfect sense for a tailor to suggest he lose weight first. After all, it would be much easier just to take his money and deliver a product that won't last or look as good.
^^^^ True dat
post #86 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post
The OP said that the tailor's daughter commented on his weight while he was in the store, further commenting as he was leaving. There is no indication that the comments were mean spirited. Moreover, they are relevant to what the OP was asking the tailor to do (make him a suit). When I was getting fit at Oxxford years ago, they advised me to slow down my orders and not get anything too slim because I am bound to gain weight and change body shape over the years. If a 24-year-old is significantly overweight, it makes perfect sense for a tailor to suggest he lose weight first. After all, it would be much easier just to take his money and deliver a product that won't last or look as good.

I think the OP took most offense that she mentioned it again as he was leaving. Like I said, mentioning it during the fitting is fine and appropriate and useful.
post #87 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Moo View Post
I think the OP took most offense that she mentioned it again as he was leaving. Like I said, mentioning it during the fitting is fine and appropriate and useful.

Consider it parting advice. I lost weight before visiting Ambrosi in Naples last year, so they had to take in my trousers. As I was leaving, Salvatore suggested I eat more pasta. Somehow, I was not offended.

Bottom line: if you're not psychologically ready to face your physical faults, you probably shouldn't go to a custom tailor.
post #88 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post
Consider it parting advice. I lost weight before visiting Ambrosi in Naples last year, so they had to take in my trousers. As I was leaving, Salvatore suggested I eat more pasta. Somehow, I was not offended.

Bottom line: if you're not psychologically ready to face your physical faults, you probably shouldn't go to a custom tailor.
Has a tailor ever corrected your posture?
post #89 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post
Consider it parting advice. I lost weight before visiting Ambrosi in Naples last year, so they had to take in my trousers. As I was leaving, Salvatore suggested I eat more pasta. Somehow, I was not offended.

Bottom line: if you're not psychologically ready to face your physical faults, you probably shouldn't go to a custom tailor.

+1
post #90 of 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ahab View Post
Has a tailor ever corrected your posture?

No, I just stand really straight. Maybe it's a function of being short and tryig to eek out every last inch possible.
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