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Shoe Damage... The Bad Kind - Page 2

post #16 of 30
+1 with taking it to a cobbler and letting him know what you want.
post #17 of 30
I asked about glue for sole leather awhile back:
http://www.styleforum.net/showthread.php?t=133119
post #18 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by tjc4golf View Post
Thanks to all who have responded with suggestions.

It sounds like a few people have had sucess with the crazy glue but Man of Lint warns it could dry the leather. Has anyone who has used the crazy glue experience drying? Man of Lint, is this the same type of contact cement that a cobbler would use?

Hi tjc4golf, yes the reason I advised the contact cement is because I have been down this road myself several times. First time I tried exactly this type of repair I also did the crazy glue and it soaked enough into the leather flap that the flap crumbled because of the glue.
Later experiences I used regular Contact Cement in a small tube, available in any hardware store.
I used a toothpick to apply a tiny bit of the cement in a very thin coating on both the leather flap
and also the sopt on the shoe where the flap will cover. Very little was needed. I let the cement dry and with tweezers, I re-positioned the flap back over the hole, then pressed very hard, then, using the back of a spoon I 'rolled' the spoon over the area to further smooth out the repaired area.
Then I also worked the spoon over the raised 'scratches', again, trying to smooth them. Then polished and buffed normally.
As to the example you gave on that link, there are many different brands of contact cement.
I am not a cobbler by trade, but I myself used brand X from my local hardware store.
For a repair this small I'm fairly certain that any contact cement will do.
Nice thing about contact cement is if any excess pokes out of the repair seam,
it can be rubbed off with your finger or a clean cloth, whereas crazy glue cannot be rubbed off.
With the contact cement you may even get a second or third chance if the first attempt fails.
If you have some scrap piece of leather there, try slicing a flap on it and doing a test until you build confidence to do the shoe. It's not hard to do.
post #19 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by tjc4golf View Post

I realize that they'll never be the same but am hopeful that they can be mended to the point that the damage is not readily noticeable (the location helps) and they're wearable again. I've thought about bringing them to my shoe guy but I'm not sure if he's got any tools at his disposal that I don't as this isn't a standard operation (at least as far as I'm aware) and am thinking about giving this a shot myself. Currently my plan is:
  1. Use a toothpick to apply a small amount of gorilla glue underneath the piece of leather that is flapping in the breeze. This should secure this piece to the shoe and cover up the most noticeable damage.
  2. Antique heels to a darker shade of brown with cream polish
  3. Apply wax polish to even out scuffs

Anyone had any success with similar damage? Good/bad idea doing this myself? My game plan sound good?

from my experience, i've never been able to glue it back properly. Because of that i cut out the pice and then use a very soft sand-paper to even the area, i.e soften the angles of the hole and then redye, recream an repolish.........
post #20 of 30
You've gotten a lot of pretty complicated advice in this thread.

Have you considered never turning around so that no one ever sees the back of the shoe?
post #21 of 30
My shoe guy recommends Barge contact cement for shoe repairs like this. I could see the superglue soaking through the leather, so maybe not a bad idea. It's just that contact cement is a little trickier for such a small repair.
post #22 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThinkDerm View Post
crazy glue the flap back on, allow to sit for 24 hours.

condition the scuffs with liberal lexol, wait 24 hours

gently buff the back of the shoe with a soft non-ribbed undershirt

condition the scuffs with lexol again, wait 24 hours.

gently buff the back of the shoe with a soft non-ribbed undershirt

apply appropriate shoe saphir cream to area (slightly darker than shoe) - pick this up cheap from www. francos.com - allow to sit for 24 hours.

gently buff the back of the shoe with a soft non-ribbed undershirt

then take a bit of shoe wax - slightly darker than cream, melt it down with lighter (gently) - apply using soft bristle clean USED toothbrush to area to be treated. allow to dry for 15 minutes.

aggressively buff the back of the shoe with a soft non-ribbed undershirt

do the melted shoe wax again. allow to dry for 15 minutes. spritz the back of the shoe with champagne (moet works fine for this). gently buff the back of the shoe with a soft non-ribbed undershirt.

then apply final wax - non melted to area. allow to sit for 1 hours. then buff like your life is depending on it.

shoes will look good as new if you follow these directions.

take photos along the way.

I would follow ThinkDerm's steps to the letter except for step 1. Use Barge Cement, not Crazy Glue.

Crazy Glue is acrylic based and will become stiff and hard. Barge Cement will flex with the leather.

Putting leather conditioner on the shoe will help the leather try to repair itself. Lexol is a good brand of conditioner and can be purchased any number of places, including from your cobbler (he probably has Barge Cement as well).
post #23 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by glenjay View Post
I would follow ThinkDerm's steps to the letter except for step 1. Use Barge Cement, not Crazy Glue.

Crazy Glue is acrylic based and will become stiff and hard. Barge Cement will flex with the leather.

Putting leather conditioner on the shoe will help the leather try to repair itself. Lexol is a good brand of conditioner and can be purchased any number of places, including from your cobbler (he probably has Barge Cement as well).

An addendum to the recommendation of Barge/contact cement: use it sparingly by applying as thin as possible layer to each side of what you're going to stick. The more you use, the less likely the leather is going to sit flush to the rest of the shoe and the more likely you're going to get bubbles in the glue - the vapors produced by the drying glue need to be able to escape. I'd apply the glue with a toothpick. I'd then press the flap down with something not too hard - like the side of a wooden spoon.
post #24 of 30
thanks to all those who gave my post respeck. do not leave out the champagne step tjc!
post #25 of 30
Thread Starter 
ThinkDerm, sorry for the delay in following up. As requested, here is outcome.

Methodology:
First I took them to the cobbler who glued the flap back on for me (I'm not sure but I presume he used contact cement). Then Lexol, wait, buff, Lexol, wait, buff, cream, wait, buff, wax, buff, wax buff. Or something like that... it's been awhile.

Original Damage:


After Visit to Cobbler:


After Lexol:


After Cream:


Finished Product:





Conclusion:
Clearly, they don't look as new (maybe it was my failure to use the champagne) but the damage doesn't bother me. It's easily noticeable if there's bright light and you're looking for it but otherwise it's not very noticeable. I've worn them probably five times since and don't think anyone has noticed.

All of the pictures except the second to last were taken with a flash or in direct sunlight accentuating the damage. The second to last is closer to how they look in normal lighting.
post #26 of 30
^ you did a good job with those.
post #27 of 30
Nice outcome.
post #28 of 30
I think the outcome is as well as could be expected, and the shoes look fine.
post #29 of 30
That was a great thread! Thanks for sharing.
post #30 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by vbuskirk View Post
That was a great thread! Thanks for sharing.
I think you can wax and polish some more.
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