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MEGA PEACOAT THREAD - 61 threads merged - all Peacoat questions HERE - Page 286

post #4276 of 5734
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunky View Post

i believe the sterlingwear navigator is 100% wool only in black....even though i love my 1949(i think) coat =P

Yes, the Navigator is 100% wool. Unfortunately it is 24 oz. wool and not the 32 oz. found in the vintage models.

If you post a picture of your tag, I can tell you the approximate year. Or, if you haven't already done so, read the article linked to in my signature line below. Sounds as if you may have already read it.
post #4277 of 5734
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peacoat View Post


Joonian is right; it should cover the butt, and not much more than that. You will find that some designers make their pea coats shorter, or longer, depending on their whim of the moment. But those aren't really pea coats--they are peacoat inspired fashion garments.
Peacoats are designed for men who have started to fill out, who have put on some weight from their adolescent years and who have developed some muscle. They aren't designed for someone who is 5'11" and 145 lbs. with no body fat and little muscle.
For my height, I am perfectly proportioned, In other words the peacoat model is based on someone with my measurements, so it is easy for me to find a peacoat that fits well. To give an example of fit, my chest measures 42". A size 42 vintage Navy peacoat is a good fit for me and allows room for a sweater underneath. It isn't a tight fit, but it is a practical fit. If I don't need a sweater on a particular day--say the temps are in the low 40s--I can wear a size 40 peacoat. There is no room for a sweater, but the fit is slim. Still comfortable but slim. The size 40 fits closer to the body and is warmer without a sweater than the 42.
I mention the stated tag size of the pea coats, but the most important number is the actual measured pit to pit size. Most, or perhaps all, of my size 42 pea coats measure right at 22.25". My size 40 peacoat measures 21.25". These are the standard measurements in those sizes for vintage (pre 1980) Navy pea coats. While perhaps 90% of the coats have the same p2p for these tag sizes, some are a bit larger. That is why I stress the importance of first measuring the circumference of one's chest and then getting an accurate p2p measurement from the seller. While usually an accurate guide, the stated tag size can be different from the actual size of the peacoat. Doesn't happen often, but it does happen.
So, if one wants a slim fit with a 42" chest, the size 40 peacoat would be the one to look for (in the vintage models). For a chest of 40" the size 38 would be the way to go. Assuming, of course, that the p2p is 20.25". For the smaller sizes, the p2p measurements are not what I would expect to see. I have three size 34 pea coats, each with a p2p of 19". We would expect these coats to have a tag size of 36, and to fit like a small size 36. I have also received numerous measurements from others with size 34 pea coats. Most of these also have a p2p of 19", although I have seen a few of a little over 18". So, when we get down into the smaller sizes, I'm not sure about an accurate guide to fit.
The WWII peacoats (8 buttons showing) will fit a little tighter than the vintage models (post war 1945--1946 to 1979), and the current issue (1980 through current) will be a little larger, in general, than the vintage models. For a slim fit in a WWII model, probably not a good idea to buy a peacoat a size smaller than one's measured chest size.
For sleeve length, I like the peacoat to strike at least an inch below the wrist joint. If it is longer than 1/2 way from the wrist to the web of the thumb, it is a bit too long.
These chest sizing guides are based on the US Navy pea coats only. I have no idea how makers of the fashion garments size their coats, but I imagine the p2p guide would still be valid. The body length and the sleeve length should be applicable to the fashion garments as well. The key is getting the seller to give an accurate p2p measurement. Also, in my opinion if one still has the body of an adolescent--no body fat and little muscle mass--It would be better to pursue a fashion peacoat, rather than the Navy peacoat.

 

What do you recommend if you're on the skinnier side, like 5'8" 150 and want a slimmer fit. I have a Sterlingwear peacoat from 1 year ago, should I get it tailored or try another brand that is slimmer in its dimensions?

post #4278 of 5734
If it only requires a little taken up, I would have it altered and see how it fits. If it is too big in the arms as well as in the torso, that would be a major overhaul. Might be simpler to just gain about 10 to 15 pounds.

As I'm not familiar with the designer pea coats, I can't give any advice about which brand might be a good fit. If you could get someone to give you a p2p on a coat in your size that you are interested in, you could use the guide in my earlier post to get a good idea of what size would fit you best.
post #4279 of 5734
Quote:
What do you recommend if you're on the skinnier side, like 5'8" 150 and want a slimmer fit

I think the Dior ones are great for slim people. They arnt too obviously 'fashion forward' as well. I posted a pic of mine but its over a day and NO moderator has approved it angry.gif

post #4280 of 5734
Hey guys,

Here is my 34R in the Anchor series.. Doesn't say which model.

I"m about 5'9 and a bit and weigh 147lbs.

Pic 1 in a T shirt



Pic 2 in a sweater



It's a bit tight around my pit area when I raise my arms in the sweater. IN the shirt it's ok.

Thoughts? Does it look tight? too short? small? The shoulders fit fine.

PS excuse the dirty mirror
post #4281 of 5734
I tried on a London Fog peacoat today. The coat looked decent, I liked the color, but I noticed it had no vents in the back. Should a peacoat have a vent, and how would it look if I were to sit down, but still had the coat buttoned (like if I were on a bus)?
post #4282 of 5734
check this out....replica of pre ww2 coat:

http://www.buzzricksons.com/us-navy-pea-coat-p-45.html
post #4283 of 5734

Any thoughts on where I should get this tailored?

 

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post #4284 of 5734
Here's my '50s peacoat (I think, based on Peacoat's dating guide) that I picked up in London this week. Loving the fit so far, but it's actually less warm than I expected. However, it is very wind and water resistant.

I have decided to make some repairs to it. I'll get new buttonholes stitched and patch up the hole in the lining. And give it a nice dryclean.

PA271401.jpg
PA271402.jpg
PA271405.jpg
post #4285 of 5734
Quote:
Originally Posted by joonian View Post

Here's my '50s peacoat (I think, based on Peacoat's dating guide) that I picked up in London this week. Loving the fit so far, but it's actually less warm than I expected. However, it is very wind and water resistant.

Yes, one of the design deficiencies of a peacoat is that they can be a bit drafty unless fitted close to the body, or worn with a sweater (jumper) to take up the extra space between the inside of the coat and the body of the wearer. If you fill in that extra space, I think you will find it is appreciably warmer.

In looking at your tag, I think it may be earlier than the 50s, maybe as early as 1945?
post #4286 of 5734
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Huh? View Post

I tried on a London Fog peacoat today. The coat looked decent, I liked the color, but I noticed it had no vents in the back. Should a peacoat have a vent, and how would it look if I were to sit down, but still had the coat buttoned (like if I were on a bus)?

Peacoats work better with a vent. It is a practical addition for the reason you stated. When you sit down while wearing your peacoat, you should unbutton the bottom button to take the strain off of the button. The thread will last longer that way.
post #4287 of 5734

700

 

 

Bill Reid Peacoat in London....

post #4288 of 5734
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peacoat View Post

In looking at your tag, I think it may be earlier than the 50s, maybe as early as 1945?

Wow, what leads you to say that? I wear it with chunky knits and it fills out nicely. But my '80s Schott A-2 flight jacket is still warmer than the peacoat. Now, that's a nice piece but I would like to upgrade to a 'proper' flight jacket if possible. Hard to sell the Schott though, not many takers.
post #4289 of 5734
Joonian: At the very top of your tag, it used to say "MANUFACTURED BY" but that portion has been either folded over the top of the pocket, or has been removed. Otherwise, it is identical to a 1945 tag. Go back to my article and take a close look at the 1945 tag (post war) that I use as an example.

I have several A-2 and A-2 type jackets. None of them is anywhere close to being warm. They do alright if worn with a sweater, but I think of them as jackets to be worn in the upper 40s and 50s (8C to 15C).
post #4290 of 5734
I just looked at the tag again, and you are absolutely right! The tag has been folded and resewn, for some reason. The top part does say 'manufactured by' and there is an anchor to the right of the legend. I can't see if there is an anchor on the left. This is brilliant, thanks! I really should put some restoration work into this piece then. It's a keeper.

Re: A-2 jacket... I got mine from a vintage store in Tokyo. It comes with a fleece lining and it's super warm, for some reason. I know most flight jackets aren't that warm, but this one seems to do the job really well. Still, I'd like to go after a repro or a TOJ commission.
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