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If your wardrobe is too large, you end up looking worse.

post #1 of 491
Thread Starter 
Other things being equal, that is. Discuss.
post #2 of 491
i agree to disagreee....... i dont know what guys here consider a fairly large wardrobe.... i was reading on esquires best dressed man, and the guy had something like 30 something plus suits....
post #3 of 491
My wardrobe size is quite large and that allows space for my clothes to breathe instead of being cramped in a small space, leaving them crumpled and wrinkled.

So a larger wardrobe makes one look his best, not to mention a neater storage.
post #4 of 491
Your wardrobe can never be too big.

post #5 of 491
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by upnorth View Post
My wardrobe size is quite large and that allows space for my clothes to breathe instead of being cramped in a small space, leaving them crumpled and wrinkled.

So a larger wardrobe makes one look his best, not to mention a neater storage.

By 'size of wardrobe' I meant the number of garments, not the physical extension of the place where they are stored. Or I'm not getting the joke.
post #6 of 491
Quote:
Originally Posted by upnorth View Post

So a larger wardrobe makes one look his best, not to mention a neater storage.

Other meaning of wardrobe.
post #7 of 491
Thread Starter 
Take, for instance, Voxsartoria. He is obviously very well dressed, but don't his clothes always look too neat, not lived in, etc?
post #8 of 491
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post #9 of 491
Quote:
Originally Posted by radicaldog View Post
Take, for instance, Voxsartoria. He is obviously very well dressed, but don't his clothes always look too neat, not lived in, etc?

He definitely suffers from too large a wardrobe. If the clothes were packed-in tighter, they'd look less neat, more lived-in, all to his (and our, since we have to look at his photos) benefit.
post #10 of 491
Quote:
Originally Posted by radicaldog View Post
Take, for instance, Voxsartoria. He is obviously very well dressed, but don't his clothes always look too neat, not lived in, etc?

post #11 of 491
Some people's personality / makeup can't handle too many of anything. Ever gone to a friends house and seen like 8 cd's in a 50 cd rack? And when you ask they say that wouldnt know what to listen to if they had more? Same thing happens in a restaurant with too large a menu, for some people its overwhelming, but for me its like time slowed down watching them.

I like a big selection but thats me because I can manage it. But for many, choice is not always a good thing.
post #12 of 491
Quote:
Originally Posted by radicaldog View Post
By 'size of wardrobe' I meant the number of garments, not the physical extension of the place where they are stored. Or I'm not getting the joke.

Sorry, I was just being radical, dawg.
post #13 of 491
Quote:
Originally Posted by radicaldog View Post
Take, for instance, Voxsartoria. He is obviously very well dressed, but don't his clothes always look too neat, not lived in, etc?

Maybe I just don't dress well, period...

Good topic, though.

Perhaps it is the photography? It could be a all the mannequin poses, which don't really do well at showing what you refer to a "lived in" look.



Just to make this more challenging for you, here is random collage of non-mannequin shots...all featuring components used in mannequin poses. Does your thesis seem strong if you look at the clothes when one is actually living in them?












Probably a bit of meticulousness seeps through above. Is it as much as you think, though?

I still like the mannequin poses because it makes it easy to focus on the clothes. The better and more creative the photography...or the more candid...the more influential the art of the photograph and the impressions of the moment captured by the shot. The latter two are related to style, but they relate style only tangentially (or not at all) to the clothes as objects.

Moreover, all the very best photographs that we all love of well dressed men are overwhelmingly commanded by professional photographs of celebrities, movies stars, and the famous, sometimes candid, but often in studio settings. Even then, what we remember is a tiny subset of photographs taken...many of which were bound to have been unfortunate (think Britney Spears fat pics.)

Another benefit of the mannequin poses? They make for far easier and far quicker photographs.

- B
post #14 of 491
I've been trying to pare down my wardrobe. My issue with it being too large is that I feel the need to always wear everything I own. I wind up with some rather poor combinations, because I'm forcing myself to make use of particular items. I feel much more comfortable with a small selection of high quality items which I can mix and match pretty easily without too much thought or effort. I think PG and Foo have mastered this very well, although with perhaps a bit too much compulsiveness. Nonetheless, I like what they've achieved and have been pushing myself in that direction.
post #15 of 491
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bartolo View Post
He definitely suffers from too large a wardrobe. If the clothes were packed-in tighter, they'd look less neat, more lived-in, all to his (and our, since we have to look at his photos) benefit.

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