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Definitive guide to wool that won't shine - Page 3

post #31 of 60
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dopey View Post
This. Also, certain weaves, especially gabardine and serge, lend themselves to picking up shine more easily than other weaves.

What exactly is serge anyhow? I thought serge was basically the same thing as gabardine: heavy twill.
post #32 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Louche View Post
What exactly is serge anyhow? I thought serge was basically the same thing as gabardine: heavy twill.
I believe serge is the same thing as plain twill (2 up, 2 down). The cloth looks the same on either side, except for the direction of the twill lines. Gabardine is a warp-faced twill (like denim). The warp threads cover more of the front of the cloth, and the weft threads cover more of the back. Denim for jeans normally has blue warp threads and white weft threads, which is why the inside of the cloth is so much lighter than the outside. The same can be done with gabardine, though it is often made in a single color.
post #33 of 60
Thread Starter 
^


Thanks for explaining - very interesting...
post #34 of 60
Thread Starter 
Alright, fellas—time to bring this up again. I have continued to pay attention to this problem, and have noticed that many of my suits—which are almost all made of some sort of Holland & Sherry worsted, usually in a 100s – 120s quality—have developed a shiny seat after 3x/month wear in 4 – 5 years. I don't know if that's considered normal, but it's irritating, and it seems that previous posters in this thread have not had this problem—assuming the wool of my suits meets the forum standard of "good" if not the best.

I do not believe that I'm putting undue wear on these—such as wearing my coat at my desk or sliding about on leather seats—and I keep dry-cleaning to about 2 – 3x/year, which seems reasonable.


MY POINT: I'M DOING EVERYTHING RIGHT, SO WHY DOES THIS KEEP HAPPENING? WHAT SPECIFIC WOOLS CAN I LOOK FOR THAT WILL NOT SHINE?
Edited by The Louche - 12/30/13 at 6:40pm
post #35 of 60

I don't have any helpful information unfortunately, but would also love to hear the answer to your questions as well as I would like to know for when I get a new suit. 

post #36 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Louche View Post

Alright, fellas—time to bring this up again. I have continued to pay attention to this problem, and have noticed that many of my suits—which are almost all made of some sort of Holland & Sherry worsted, usually in a 100s – 120s quality—have developed a shiny seat after 3x/month wear in 4 – 5 years. I don't know if that's considered normal, but it's irritating, and it seems that previous posters in this thread have not had this problem—assuming the wool of my suits meets the forum standard of "good" if not the best.

I do not believe that I'm putting undue wear on these—such as wearing my coat at my desk or sliding about on leather seats—and I keep dry-cleaning to about 2 – 3x/year, which seems reasonable.


MY POINT: I'M DOING EVERYTHING RIGHT, SO WHY DOES THIS KEEP HAPPENING? WHAT SPECIFIC WOOLS CAN I LOOK FOR THAT WILL NOT SHINE?

Is your dry cleaner "good"?

Do you sweat a lot? Do you drag your ass on the ground when it itches? biggrin.gif

Obviously, since you say it is localized, it is not caused just by the dry cleaner, but maybe the cleaner screws it up such that it is then more susceptible to wearing in a shine.

The only problems I've had with shine have been on a pair of pants and a suit which I took to an organic cleaners after my (good) dry cleaner closed. Both came back shiny all over. And 4 great dress shirts tore in the elbow on the immediate next wear. Considered throwing a rock through the window.
post #37 of 60
Thread Starter 
Yes, I use a few different cleaners, but I would consider each of them good -- if not perhaps the best. I certainly know enough to not inadvertently use a truly poor cleaners.

As I have thought more about this since my last post, I have come to consider that what I'm experiencing may truly be normal, and that my assessment is a bit of an over-reaction: the seats of the trousers in question ire indeed more shiny than when they were new, but not shiny in the way that can be seen from a distance -- they are merely shiny upon close inspection, and when held under a light that provides glare.

Anybody else assess this "half-assed" shine (pun intended) as a fact of life?
post #38 of 60
^

a.k.a. "anyone else's suits look shiny under lights that make suits look shiny?"
post #39 of 60
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NeedForTweed123 View Post

I don't have any helpful information unfortunately, but would also love to hear the answer to your questions as well as I would like to know for when I get a new suit. 

Tweed won't shine -- of that I'm almost sure.
post #40 of 60

Does woolen flannel shine?

post #41 of 60
Thread Starter 
No -- flannel will not shine, but it will go thread-bear. Personally, the appearance of thread-bear material is far less of an issue than that of shiny material.
post #42 of 60
I'm gonna disagree and say flannel can pick up a shine. If elbows are subjected to rubbing and dirt and stuff, for instance.
post #43 of 60
Thread Starter 
I think flannel might eventually pick-up a shine, but this would presumably be after the nap had already worn off to the point that you were left with thread-bear wool, resembling something closer to worsted in the first place ... this would indeed take a very long time.
post #44 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Louche View Post

I think flannel might eventually pick-up a shine, but this would presumably be after the nap had already worn off to the point that you were left with thread-bear wool, resembling something closer to worsted in the first place ... this would indeed take a very long time.

Any idea of a general time span for flannels? Or even worsteds? I'm not very hard on my clothes, but with the way everyone talks about wool shine and the longevity of wool, it makes me hesitate to drop serious money on trousers/jackets/suits (even though I will because you shouldn't skimp on quality for these types of things) because it sounds like I'll be paying a very large sum of money for something that will last a very short time.

post #45 of 60
Thread Starter 
I started this thread because most of my worsteds start to shine -- usually on the seat -- in about 4 years. This is with approx. 3x/month wear.

From what many have said -- such as "your worsted suit should last a very, very long time" -- this is an unacceptably short life span (yes, I consider wool that has gone shiny to be worn-out). I'm baffled by people that claim to get 20 years out of a suit -- I simply don't see how that's possible unless you only wear it once every few months or less, and that's simply not possible with business suits unless you have dozens of them.
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