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Vass distributorships, globalization, protectionism, etc... - Page 5

post #61 of 240
Quote:
Vass cares because it is trying to penetrate the US market, which requires that merchants and importers/distributors make some return on their investment (of time and money). If it allows its European retailers to undercut the US merchants, then Vass may find it has no retail presence in the US, which is certain to dramatically limit the number of shoes it can sell here. Business is a multi-year enterprise, so considering all sales to be 'equal' is inappropriate

sounds about right
post #62 of 240
Quote:
Originally Posted by tiger02
Curious--how does LVMH get around this to enforce its "no sales" policy?

At least for their Louis Vuitton baubles, don't they own all of their retail outlets?
post #63 of 240
I offer a novel solution: fly to Budapest, and Mr. Vass should put you up in his spare bedroom if you buy two pairs.
post #64 of 240
Quote:
Originally Posted by tiger02
Curious--how does LVMH get around this to enforce its "no sales" policy?

What "no sales" policy? LVMH products are discounted left, right, and center (TAG, Kenzo, Pinks, and Fendi, are a few that spring to mind). The only way to manage this is to own all the stores then you can enforce your price policies. This is a horribly expensive route and is usually as much about marketing and brand perception as it is about sales.
post #65 of 240
I think it refers only to Louis Vuitton handbags and the like which according to that Business Week article a couple of years ago are only sold in LV stores.
post #66 of 240
Berluti, too. Only the very high end labels don't go on sale.
post #67 of 240
Duplicate of post on AAAC:

Why hasn't anyone excoriated the blabbermouth who mentioned the German store in the first place?

50% of manufacturers in Vass' place would do as they did, 50% wouldn't. The principle of it all can be debated until the end of time.

I know Andrew Harris and Gabor Halmor personally. The LAST word I would use to describe either of them is greedy.
post #68 of 240
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve B.
Duplicate of post on AAAC:

Why hasn't anyone excoriated the blabbermouth who mentioned the German store in the first place?


Come on now, Aportnoy was simply sharing a find with the rest of this forum, which is what makes this a great place in the first place. Are you suggesting we should all shut up and not share deals with our brethren?
post #69 of 240
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve B.
Duplicate of post on AAAC:

Why hasn't anyone excoriated the blabbermouth who mentioned the German store in the first place?


Are you serious??!! WTF??!! Why do we want to excoriate someone who shared information with us on where to get good deals? Isn't this forum all about? While you are at it, why don't you shut down all "sales alert" posts.
post #70 of 240
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve B.
Duplicate of post on AAAC:

Why hasn't anyone excoriated the blabbermouth who mentioned the German store in the first place?

50% of manufacturers in Vass' place would do as they did, 50% wouldn't. The principle of it all can be debated until the end of time.

I know Andrew Harris and Gabor Halmor personally. The LAST word I would use to describe either of them is greedy.


post #71 of 240
It was a great service to the forum, at least to those who had a chance to take advantage of the low prices. However, I don't see the point in crying over this issue. If you don't agree with the business practices involved, don't buy the shoes. I find it laughable that this can in anyway be compared to a monopoly. Do you seriously believe that somehow because of what happened in this case, every luxury shoe maker in the world will suddenly start selling all of their shoes at ridiculous prices without fear of pricing themselves out of the market altogether? As shoefan has already stated, nothing prevents you from hopping a plane to Germany or finding a friend there to buy the shoes and sending them to you. I also don't see anything underhanded about some businessmen protecting their business interest. Again if you don't agree with it. Show it with your business or lack thereof.
post #72 of 240
Vass is a different situation because they are a small company, and both of its US principals read the Forum and post fairly regularly.

How do you think they'd react?

How would another company in a similar situation react?

Half of them would say, oh well, and look the other way.

Say, Robert Graham, before he got to the size he is now.

Or Robert Talbott, who still is very territorial about which specialty stores are allowed to buy its product, and does not sell merchandise online.

Or Zegna while it was growin to the huge size it is today, which made retailers purchase a large amount of goods to carry the line, and would drop any store that broke a sale outside of well established parameters set up by the company.

Half would act to protect their distribution channel, which is what Vass did...

Yes, you are free to make your own choice as consumers, and you may disagree with Gabor and Andrew's decision. But to call them greedy and compare their actions to Hungary in 1956 is a personal attack.

Especially since Vass has repeatedly offered sample sales and promotions here. It's not like they've ruled with an iron fist.
post #73 of 240
Thread Starter 
Wow. And I really thoguht that selling shoes at a higher price was the same as brutally invading a country and repressing its people for wanting to be free. Color me stupid. Thanks for the history lesson big guy!

Oh, by the way...this might help:

Main Entry: iro·ny
Pronunciation: 'I-r&-nE also 'I(-&)r-nE
Function: noun
Inflected Form(s): plural -nies
Etymology: Latin ironia, from Greek eirOnia, from eirOn dissembler
1 : a pretense of ignorance and of willingness to learn from another assumed in order to make the other's false conceptions conspicuous by adroit questioning -- called also Socratic irony
2 a : the use of words to express something other than and especially the opposite of the literal meaning b : a usually humorous or sardonic literary style or form characterized by irony c : an ironic expression or utterance
3 a (1) : incongruity between the actual result of a sequence of events and the normal or expected result (2) : an event or result marked by such incongruity b : incongruity between a situation developed in a drama and the accompanying words or actions that is understood by the audience but not by the characters in the play -- called also dramatic irony, tragic irony
post #74 of 240
Quote:
Wow. And I really thoguht that selling shoes at a higher price was the same as brutally invading a country and repressing its people for wanting to be free. Color me stupid. Thanks for the history lesson big guy!

Walk me though it. I guess I'm just too slow-witted to comprehend...
post #75 of 240
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve B.
Why hasn't anyone excoriated the blabbermouth who mentioned the German store in the first place?

Err... what?

Are you using an online translation tool or something? this comment makes zero sense...

This is what this forum is all about (sharing information, developping a community...) - you're a moderator, you should probably know that
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