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Are Felons Allowed to Practice Law? - Page 3

post #31 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by rnoldh View Post
She was able to make more money as a BigWhore
She could've been BigWhore at BigLaw. Partner track in 5 yrs, tops.
Quote:
Originally Posted by lpresq View Post
Dark, you are an attorney?
Yes.
post #32 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkNWorn View Post
This Stanford Law grad might have a bit of trouble getting admitted, but probably not the least because she used to be a call girl.



[I wonder why she turned down BigLaw?!? ]

It's too bad she couldn't stick with the Ask Jeeves guy. Maybe she's a sex addict or something. Would be fun to have around the office.
post #33 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benzito View Post
Three relevant (and real) cases:

1. Peer of mine in law school was formerly imprisoned for either being a drug dealer or merely a money launderer for a drug dealer. Served two years or so and paid a huge fine, got a CPA license, cleaned up his shit and passed the bar. They denied him twice, but he ultimately got his ticket after several employers and other professionals vouched for him turning his life around.

2. There is a current attorney in my jurisdiction who was caught jerking it in a mall parking lot while (allegedly) following around young women. Got a public reprimand (in the bar journal, no less), but still in practice.

3. NYT reported a fella who passed the recent bar, but was denied admission b/c he owed too much in student loans. WTF??? How is he supposed to pay back the money without a lawyer job?

#3 is messed up if it happened. Good thing there are 50 states. Somewhere is a state willing to grant a law license.
post #34 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by baseball_guy View Post
#3 is messed up if it happened. Good thing there are 50 states. Somewhere is a state willing to grant a law license.

He was denied, not only because he owed too much money in student loans, but because he had a history of missing payments, defaulting, debts going into collection, etc.
post #35 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by crazyquik View Post
He was denied, not only because he owed too much money in student loans, but because he had a history of missing payments, defaulting, debts going into collection, etc.

Still wrong IMHO to deny a person a job because they've had problems repaying loans.
post #36 of 50
Yeah, he "missed payments" because he had a serious accident and head injury or something like that. I might give the guy a pass and deferral for that. Either way, now he wants to get a job to pay the creditors back and they'd rather he work at McDonald's? Yeah, that makes sense.
post #37 of 50
(jpier's a felon?)
post #38 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by edmorel View Post
If criminals couldn't practice law, we'd have no lawyers.

(awaiting odoreater F.U.!!!!!)


This^^
post #39 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by crazyquik View Post
He was denied, not only because he owed too much money in student loans, but because he had a history of missing payments, defaulting, debts going into collection, etc.

Back when I still lived in the Chicago area there was a cable channel that would run a list of Doctors & Lawyers and other high profile types that were behind and or defaulting on their student loans.

It was pretty surprising how many people were on the list.
post #40 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by edmorel View Post
If criminals couldn't practice law, we'd have no lawyers.

(awaiting odoreater F.U.!!!!!)

Must to be criminal for think similar of criminal!
post #41 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by hws View Post
Must to be criminal for think similar of criminal!

post #42 of 50
Before my bar admission, I had to provide a report showing my driving record. I had an unpaid speeding ticket from a different state from over a decade earlier. It was requested that I clean that up. When I interviewed with a member of my state bar, which was required as part of my character and fitness evaluation, she told me a story about not allowing an applicant admission, because he had too many unpaid tickets.
post #43 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by zbromer View Post
Before my bar admission, I had to provide a report showing my driving record. I had an unpaid speeding ticket from a different state from over a decade earlier. It was requested that I clean that up. When I interviewed with a member of my state bar, which was required as part of my character and fitness evaluation, she told me a story about not allowing an applicant admission, because he had too many unpaid tickets.

Unpaid parking tickets? What does any of this have to do with the ability to practice law?
post #44 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by baseball_guy View Post
Unpaid parking tickets? What does any of this have to do with the ability to practice law?

It shows a general disregard or disdain for the law. Has nothing to do with ability. It's about character and fitness.
post #45 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by crazyquik View Post
It shows a general disregard or disdain for the law. Has nothing to do with ability. It's about character and fitness.
It appears then that it's all downhill from admission onwards, no?
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