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Are Felons Allowed to Practice Law? - Page 2

post #16 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teger View Post
this is a bizarre question, but how about non fraud related felonies that do not result in jail time? things like a DUI?

A DUI usually doesn't get you disbarred. If it did, there'd be a heck of a lot less practicing attorneys in this country because, as a profession, we have one of the highest rates (if not the highest) of alcoholics.
post #17 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkNWorn View Post
A DUI usually doesn't get you disbarred. If it did, there'd be a heck of a lot less practicing attorneys in this country because, as a profession, we have one of the highest rates (if not the highest) of alcoholics.

I have seen this claimed elsewhere. If you have beat out film editors, that is impressive / horrifying.
post #18 of 50
Can felons practice law? Sure, until they get caught.

I'm sure somebody beat me to this one.
post #19 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkNWorn View Post
A DUI usually doesn't get you disbarred. If it did, there'd be a heck of a lot less practicing attorneys in this country because, as a profession, we have one of the highest rates (if not the highest) of alcoholics.

Nurses. Oh man, between booze and drugs? Think about that.
post #20 of 50
Three relevant (and real) cases:

1. Peer of mine in law school was formerly imprisoned for either being a drug dealer or merely a money launderer for a drug dealer. Served two years or so and paid a huge fine, got a CPA license, cleaned up his shit and passed the bar. They denied him twice, but he ultimately got his ticket after several employers and other professionals vouched for him turning his life around.

2. There is a current attorney in my jurisdiction who was caught jerking it in a mall parking lot while (allegedly) following around young women. Got a public reprimand (in the bar journal, no less), but still in practice.

3. NYT reported a fella who passed the recent bar, but was denied admission b/c he owed too much in student loans. WTF??? How is he supposed to pay back the money without a lawyer job?
post #21 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benzito View Post
Three relevant (and real) cases:
3. NYT reported a fella who passed the recent bar, but was denied admission b/c he owed too much in student loans. WTF??? How is he supposed to pay back the money without a lawyer job?

I think the story was a little more complicated than that. He had something like $450,000 in student loan debt dating from the mid 1980s and made no effort whatsoever to pay it back at any point. Not saying it's right for them to deny him admission for that, but it's more than just some average kid with some student loan debt.
post #22 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bird's One View View Post
I have seen this claimed elsewhere. If you have beat out film editors, that is impressive / horrifying.

Or cooks.
post #23 of 50
You can certainly be an ex-addict and still become a lawyer and then a Judge, at least here in Texas.

Judge Kevin Fine has done this in Houston , Texas.

I know him from 12 step programs ( he's a big advocate of the programs in drug court and wouldn't mind me mentioning this).

I'm not sure of his criminal record but it's a matter of public record and can be found on Google.

Here's another link to part of his story.
post #24 of 50
[quote=jpeirpont;2512238]
Quote:
Originally Posted by theincumbent View Post
Depends on the State, and is usually not a matter of having the conviction "cleared."

The admission to the Bar of a state is governed by that particular Board of Bar Examiners with each
state having certain requirements for Character and Fitness. The easy answer to your question is "maybe," depending upon the severity of the conviction.

A common conviction in law school that did not prevent bar admission (in most cases) was DUI.

Thinking of taking the jump; going to law school?[/QUOTE]

No, just curious. I was reading a discussion where someone said some couldn;t become a lawyer if they were ever convicted of a felony and I wonder "why not" if they record was cleared.
In some jurisdictions, a conviction for a felony deemed a crime of moral turpitude can be grounds for summary disbarment. I would imagine that if the felony were expunged (which is often very difficult to accomplish) it probably would eliminate the conviction as a basis for automatic disbarment. However . . .
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post
Wasn't there a white supremist, with a clean criminal record, banned from taking the bar in Ohio a few years ago?

In most jurisdictions I know of, one can be disbarred for conduct demonstrating unfitness regardless of whether there is a corresponding criminal conviction. (I assume that was what happened in the case Pio mentions.) Thus, I would imagine that even if the conviction were expunged, the underlying conduct, if proven by whatever standard of evidence is generally applied in disbarment proceedings under the law of the relevant state, could still serve as grounds for disbarment regardless of the expungement.
In other words, I think that in many jurisdictions getting a conviction expunged would improve one's chances of being able to practice, but certainly would not guarantee it.
post #25 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post
Wasn't there a white supremist, with a clean criminal record, banned from taking the bar in Ohio a few years ago?

yeah
post #26 of 50
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by yerfdog View Post
yeah

That just seems wrong to me.
post #27 of 50
This Stanford Law grad might have a bit of trouble getting admitted, but probably not the least because she used to be a call girl.



[I wonder why she turned down BigLaw?!? ]
post #28 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by theincumbent View Post
Depends on the State, and is usually not a matter of having the conviction "cleared."

The admission to the Bar of a state is governed by that particular Board of Bar Examiners with each
state having certain requirements for Character and Fitness. The easy answer to your question is "maybe," depending upon the severity of the conviction.

A common conviction in law school that did not prevent bar admission (in most cases) was DUI.

Thinking of taking the jump; going to law school?

Isn't DUI a misdemeanor?
post #29 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkNWorn View Post
This Stanford Law grad might have a bit of trouble getting admitted, but probably not the least because she used to be a call girl.



[I wonder why she turned down BigLaw?!? ]

She was able to make more money as a BigWhore
post #30 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkNWorn View Post
A DUI usually doesn't get you disbarred. If it did, there'd be a heck of a lot less practicing attorneys in this country because, as a profession, we have one of the highest rates (if not the highest) of alcoholics.

Dark, you are an attorney?
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