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Interview attire for academic position in a UK classics department - Page 2

post #16 of 32
Yep, dress the part.

post #17 of 32
I'm pretty sure university lecturers still wear suits... We did have one mad old git who wore a tracksuit (and he also dressed as Gandalf at Christmas) but most wore suits.
post #18 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prince of Paisley View Post
Yep, dress the part.


Is that the Gene Genie in your av?
post #19 of 32
My training was in the classics, and I can tell you, everybody is no different.
post #20 of 32
Option 1 or 2. I'd avoid the DB. Go with whatever you'll be more comfortable with. And for the record, none of the Classics fellows at Balliol were tweedy types last time I checked.
post #21 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ich_Dien View Post
My training was in the classics, and I can tell you, everybody is no different.

Quote:
Originally Posted by literasyme View Post
Option 1 or 2. I'd avoid the DB. Go with whatever you'll be more comfortable with. And for the record, none of the Classics fellows at Balliol were tweedy types last time I checked.

The only two words that one needs to know are "Jan" and "Libourel."

Cruiser, delenda est.


- B
post #22 of 32
I remember classics teacher from high school. He was only thirty something but he spoke, acted and dressed like he was sixty something. You should wear a lot of tweed.
post #23 of 32
I never see such a flurry of bad advice on SF as when someone posts a question about an academic job interview. Please do not dress, as someone said, like the "comic book version" of a college professor and especially not the SF version.

It's a professional interview. The department doesn't matter. The field doesn't matter. What the average professor wears on a daily basis really doesn't matter. For the on-campus portion of the process, just wear a suit. Navy or charcoal. Simple and boring. At the end of the day, clothes alone will not get nor cost you a job, but it's best to take them out of the equation.
post #24 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by pendragon View Post
For classics, I think a toga would be appropriate.
+1 (you beat me)
post #25 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by greyinla View Post
It's a professional interview. The department doesn't matter. The field doesn't matter. What the average professor wears on a daily basis really doesn't matter. For the on-campus portion of the process, just wear a suit. Navy or charcoal. Simple and boring. At the end of the day, clothes alone will not get nor cost you a job, but it's best to take them out of the equation.
Well said.
post #26 of 32
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the responses. The advice about 'dressing your profession' is good, except that there isn't an academic 'uniform' any more. In my (brief) career so far I've seen a number of interviews in philosophy departments in the US and UK, and in a social sciences dept in the UK. Most male candidates wore suits, almost invariably of dismal quality and fit. One philosopher once wore a leather sportscoat, black office pants (haha), a shirt of sorts, and no tie. Another one wore a black suit, white shirt, and black tie. But philosophers are probably almost on a par with scientist as far as shabbiness goes. Anyway, I was just wondering if anyone had witnessed a job interview in a UK classics dept.
post #27 of 32
Not specifically classics but I've worked in FE and HE in the UK for a number of years. For the interview I'd play it safe and go with a suit, you won't come over as over-dressed and avoid any risk of being under-dressed.
post #28 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by radicaldog View Post
I don't have time to get new clothes. And unfortunately some of my seasonal clothes are now at the tailor's (in Italy) for alterations and/or finishing touches. The realistic and superstition-approved options are:

- Navy 2B worsted suit, fairly slim cut, Zegna cloth.
- Camel-coloured 3B tweed coat (solid-coloured Robert Noble cloth, mid-weight) and mid-grey flannels.
- DB 4x2 cachemere blazer with black horn buttons, and the same flannels.
- Brown RTW 3B corduroy suit -- I'd actually avoid this one, come to think of it.

Go with your first choice, the navy suit. You are trying to convey a sense of professionalism and respect for those you are about to meet who represent the institution. Generally, a suit is perceived to be the expected level of dress for such meetings. Whether that perception is reasonable or correct is another matter entirely.
post #29 of 32
Go dressed as yourself but don't descend into costume or undue eccentricity.

You don't know who you are going to meet or be introduced to, despite who your interviewer is scheduled to be so caution remains appropriate. You can do the 'mad professor' look after you have taken up the appointment.
post #30 of 32
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GBR View Post
Go dressed as yourself but don't descend into costume or undue eccentricity.

You don't know who you are going to meet or be introduced to, despite who your interviewer is scheduled to be so caution remains appropriate. You can do the 'mad professor' look after you have taken up the appointment.

Well, my daily dress consists of tweed coats, denim jeans, linen coats/suits, corduroy trousers/suits, sometimes flannel, etc; OCBDs or other soft-collared shirts; desert boots or the occasional 'proper' shoe; knit or wool or printed paisley ties sometimes. You get the idea. Obviously I'm going to be more formal for the interview. A suit is certainly appropriate, but I was wondering whether there could be some other combination that could give me a tiny edge of sorts. As you can see I'm just being anxious and I'm using this forum for venting purposes -- apols.

Btw, I do know who is on the panel: four professors (mostly historians), two males and two females.
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